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10

We must remember that two people with the same education and knowledge of original Biblical languages, will, and commonly do, conclude opposite conclusions while maintaining proclaimed objectivity in their exegesis. This is exactly what Protestant and Catholic scholars do concerning this verse. The reality is that everyone makes their exegetical conclusion ...


9

It would be difficult to give a 100% definitive answer unless there is some commentary by the translation committee on this (which I have not found, but may exist). The following is offered as reasonable conclusions from other evidence. Variation It is deemed by some that good writing avoids an abundance of repetition in word usage. For example, this page ...


7

It is common for verbs to be implied in the Greek but not actually appear in the text. Often the context will make little sense without it or will make it clear which verb is to be used, as is the case here. This is standard in many languages even today (especially with the verb "to be"), but not in English. Let me begin with an example in English: I ...


7

What Promise is this? There is none in these words. So write Sanday and Headlam (A critical and exegetical commentary on the Epistle to the Romans, 5th edn (ICC; T & T Clark, 1902), p. 111). They don't go on to explain much, and here James Denney (notable Scottish theologian) does a better job in the Expositor's Greek Testament (Hodder & ...


6

It should be noted that several terms in the NT have broader and narrower meanings, such as diakonos, which can refer to Christ Himself (Rom 15:8), to an ordained role ("deacon"; see Phi 1:1; 1 Tim 3:8–12) or more generally to any servant of the church, even a "minister" (e.g. in Col 1:25, Paul refers to himself as a diakonos; cf also 1 Tim 4:6: Timothy was ...


5

The Greek text for Romans 4:25 (from the NA28, emphasis mine) reads: ὃς παρεδόθη διὰ τὰ παραπτώματα ἡμῶν καὶ ἠγέρθη διὰ τὴν δικαίωσιν ἡμῶν. The preposition διὰ followed by an accusative generally has a gloss of "on account of" or "because of," but could also carry the connotation "for the sake of." It almost always carries the force of the NASB ...


4

An alternative explanation could just be rooted in practicality. The pattern had already been established by the Antiochene church in Acts 11:27-30. Agabus predicted an imminent famine and the church in Antioch. There were many famines during Claudius's reign (41-54), the most severe of which occurred in Judea around 46-47. Because of the imminent threat, ...


4

One possibility is that it came out of the meeting in Jerusalem described in Galatians 2, where Paul writes: and when James and Cephas and John, who were acknowledged pillars, recognized the grace that had been given to me, they gave to Barnabas and me the right hand of fellowship, agreeing that we should go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised. ...


4

εἰς is part of an idiom here and can also be translated as "unto." αὐτῷ ἡ δόξα εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας, ἀμήν "(To) him (be) the glory unto the ages, amen." The idiom is εἰς τοὺς αἰῶνας ("unto the ages") and means "forever." Source: My years in Koine Greek classes, and I think I also read it in Porter's Idioms of the Greek New Testament. I think Edwards does a ...


3

Short Answer: Yes, all of the verbs are aorist. In fact, they are all identical in all of the following ways: Part of Speech: Verb Tense: Aorist Mood: Indicative Voice: Active Person: 3rd Person Number: Singular Here they are, for reference: προέγνω (he foreknew) προώρισεν (he predestined) προώρισεν (he predestined #2) ἐκάλεσεν (he called) ...


3

In short, Paul sees his outreach to the Gentiles as a ministry to Israel (Romans 11:12-15). God promised Abraham that in his seed all the nations (Gentiles) of the world would be blessed (Genesis 22:18; Galatians 3:15). And Isaiah prophesied In the last days the mountain of the Lord’s temple will be established as the highest of the mountains; it ...


3

It seems to me that there could scarcely be much question about the meaning once we take into account the multiple references to the Jerusalem collection project throughout both Acts and Paul's letters (see e.g. Acts 11:27–30; 24:17; 1 Cor 16:1ff; 2 Cor 9 etc; cf Gal 2:10). In the immediate context, Paul makes a parallel between how the Gentiles have ...


2

If Paul wanted to convey the idea of "freed," then he would have used a form of the Greek verb ἐλευθερόω, which occurs twice in this immediate chapter (Rom 6:18 and Rom 6:22), where Paul in fact makes the explicit allusion of being "freed from sin." In Rom 6:7 however Paul used a different Greek verb and for specific purpose. The Greek verb is δικαιόω or ...


2

The answer lies in the understanding of the word "Kosmos", which in English is translated "world", yet has a variety of meanings in the Greek. I am not a linguist, but after searching, found this exposition by A.W. Pink: It may appear to some of our readers that the exposition we have given of John 3:16 in the chapter on "Difficulties and Objections" ...


2

hiskingdomprophecy.com/heaping-coals has a couple of interesting interpretations, one of which I had heard previously. They quote Kenneth Samuel Wuest (1893-1962): “In Bible times an oriental needed to keep his hearth fire going all the time in order to insure fire for cooking and warmth. If it went out, he had to go to a neighbour for some live coals of ...


2

In your haste you may have skipped over perhaps the most important aspect of God's promise to Abraham while he was still living with his father's family in Ur. "'And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed'" (Genesis 12:3, my emphasis). About 25 years later, God appeared again to Abram and renamed him Abraham, renewing the promise He made ...


1

The following is based on internal evidence from within the Greek New Testament. First, in the Greek New Testament the middle voice and the passive voice are conjugated exactly the same in the perfect tense (non-deponent verbs), so to suggest that the particular verb in question is "middle" or "passive" is the opinion of the one interpreting the passage. ...


1

According to the plain and normal reading of the Bible, "the world" would be blessed through Abraham (Gen 18:18 and Acts 3:25 with Gal 3:8). The nuance is that the lesser is blessed by the greater (Heb 7:7). If the nations are blessed through Abraham, the connotation is that Abraham is greater than the nations. His seed, who represents all the promises given ...


1

Hate to say it, but... a theological agenda, most likely. Most Bible versions are Protestant (and I'm a Protestant, just for the record), and Protestants tend to be nervous regarding "justification" being anything other than a "judicial" or "forensic" declaration. Part of the problem here, however, is an anachronistic understanding of the role of a judge. ...



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