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διὰ It can be a fool's game to hang Greek translations on prepositions, as the range of meaning is different from English and so we don't naturally read words in their intended range. But at least we have clues in this text to help us get started on the meaning of διὰ. Fortunately this sentence uses the term twice, such that 'we were buried διὰ baptism ...


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Succinctly stated, the apostle Paul principally uses the phrase "in the flesh" (ἐν σαρκὶ) to denote humans in whom the Holy Spirit does not dwell, and for those in whom it does dwell, Christians, he denotes by the phrase "in the Spirit" (ἐν πνεύματι). For example, in Rom. 8:9, it is written, 9 But you are not in the flesh, but in the Spirit, if indeed ...


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As far as I know, Paul never really uses the term 'Christian gentile' - the point was that they were 'grafted in' and so were without distinction, and this is the larger teaching which Romans develops throughout its text: "But if some of the branches were broken off, and you, although a wild olive shoot, were grafted in among the others and now share in ...


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The literary picture within the Christian New Testament indicates that the Glory of the Father is the divine power of the Holy Spirit, by whom the Father raised Jesus Christ from the dead (Gal 1:1). For example, this phase “by the glory of the Father” (διὰ τῆς δόξης τοῦ πατρός) appears parallel in meaning to what Jesus told Mary and Martha in the following ...


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Romans 10:17: "So then faith cometh by hearing, and hearing by the Word of God" (KJV), or "So faith comes from hearing, and hearing by the word of Christ" (NASB)? James made note that faith in God was not something special: "You believe that there is one God. Good! Even the demons believe that — and shudder" (James 2:19, NIV). Salvation comes through ...


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Aramaic is a Semitic language ala Hebrew and Arabic. In fact it could be considered a dialect of Hebrew though it is different enough to be considered its own language, much like the Romantic languages that branched off of Latin: http://jewishencyclopedia.com/articles/1707-aramaic-language-among-the-jews "Abba" means "my father" which was more useful for ...



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