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17

Translation From the Apostolic Bible: Your first question is in regards to the translation. It seems that all three would be pretty valid translations. The original Greek for "the beginnings" here is arche: Strings G746 1. beginning, origin 2. the person or thing that commences, the first person or thing in a series, the leader 3. that by ...


13

I believe "sit" in Rev 17:1 is intended to convey the settledness of a potentate in pomp (as also seen in an earlier answer). This sitting/setting needs to be seen in the immediate context, and in relation to John's use of the Hebrew scriptures. Principles for interpretation I'll start with two general principles for interpreting the book of Revelation ...


12

"Hades" is the Greek word for the realm of the dead. In the Greek Septuagint, it replaces the Hebrew word "Sheol". There's not a lot of description of Hades within the main canon - chiefly the parable in Luke 16 - but generally it is considered the holding place for the souls of the dead until the final judgement. It is sometimes thought to be divided into ...


11

I don't think it's as simple as knowing when to take a verse literally or symbolically. I will attempt to propose a hermeneutical approach to the translation of the book of Revelation. I am going to approach the text from a Christian perspective (as this was the intended audience). I would not call these 'rules,' but rather 'principles' of interpretation ...


10

Who are the morning stars? From the text, I would say the morning stars are the sons of God that are mentioned. This passage seemed to follow a common parallel format found in the surrounding text. Look at the repetitious nature of the surrounding passages for my reasoning: 5 Who determined its measurements—surely you know! Or who stretched the line ...


10

First we must lay out two basic interpretive principles. Then I will list the meaning of the 144,000 (Revelation 7:4-8; 14:1-5) for each of the four main Christian interpretive approaches to the book of Revelation. Interpretive Principles First we must decide if the 144,000 mentioned in Revelation 7:4-8 are the same as those in 14:1-5, or if they refer to ...


10

The Bible Answers this as "No" Quoting you (all quotations are from prior to editing the "tone" of the question): Is the Urantia Book ("White Stone") foretold in The Book of Revelation 2:17 ? There is no textual evidence to link the "white stone" symbol to the Urantia Book. Such a connection is an arbitrary assertion. Of course, because we are ...


9

Questions on Revelation are extremely difficult to answer because they are so highly based on your view of Revelation, which is too hard to argue for in one post. I don't have the expertise to give a great answer to this question, but I thought I might as well give it a shot since no one else has. As someone who tends towards a partial preterist position, I ...


9

I did look into this for a paper on Revelation and First Enoch (The Canonicity of Apocalyptic Literature). Whenever it was written, Revelation aims to encourage Christians during an imperial persecution. Arguments for a Late Date (A.D. 96) As external evidence they point to the early church writers like Iraneus (Against Heresies 5.30.3), Victorinus of ...


9

I understand you may be looking for an exegesis that fits within your existing view ('that 90% of the Book of Revelations is yet to be fulfilled'). However, I will be offering a more grammatical-historical approach. The Roman Empire destroyed Jerusalem and its temple in 70 AD, an event Jews quickly began comparing to the destruction of Jerusalem and its ...


9

The existing answer already gives the essentials. This variation in reading Revelation 22:14 persists across quite a number of modern English translations. I thought it might help to have a bit of explanation, too, especially if readers have some sense of the textual landscape for the NT. Not for nothing does the introduction to the Nestle-Aland edition ...


9

A bit of history Of the earlier known prophetic texts of Israel, we find a variety of delivery styles: plain oration, song, poetry, etc. There is a fair amount of figurative speech, but the messages are more or less straightforward: God is coming to judge Judah! He will raise up Nebudchadnezzar against Tyre! He will deliver Moab to the Edomites! But during ...


8

One of my favorite sayings in hermeneutics is: The meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. As you indicated in your question, there are many "women" mentioned in the Bible, so to determine which "woman" is being referenced here, we need to look at the context. As we proceed, keep in mind that this is "a great sign in ...


8

According to the NET Translator's notes, The vast majority of witnesses have αὐτούς (autous, “them”) here, while the Textus Receptus reads ἡμᾶς (Jhmas, “us”) with insignificant support (pc gig vgcl sa Prim Bea). There is no question that the original text read αὐτούς here.... The textual problem here between the present tense βασιλεύουσιν ...


8

I know you asked for contextual evidence and I hope to get there. However, when it comes to these sorts of things, contextual (which is part of internal) evidence is really only one of the factors that goes into these sorts of things. overview of internal and external evidence The UBS (4th ed.) also has αὐτοὺς (which is unsurprising given the overlap ...


8

(Supplementary answer) kuriakē(i) (LSJ) (from κυριακῇ ἡμέρᾳ) is an adjectival form of kurios, "lord", which could be rendered "lordly" (on analogy of "royal" = "kingly", roughly!). As the adjective "royal" indicates something belonging to the monarch ("the royal palace"), so kuriakos indicates something belonging to the "lord". Rev 1:10 uses it with day: ...


8

For an early date Among the arguments in favor for an early date (i.e. during emperor Nero) is: A temple seems to exist in Rev 11, but the temple was destroyed in AD 70. The counter argument is of course that this temple is a part of a symbolic vision and should not be mixed up with the physical temple. Revelation addresses the tension between the Jews ...


8

In Greek, Revelation 13.8 says: ου ου γεγραπται το ονομα αυτου εν τω βιβλιω της ζωης του αρνιου του εσφαγμενου απο καταβολης κοσμου With only a little correction for English syntax, this can be partly translated as: anyone whose name is not written in the scroll of the life of the lamb the slaughtered απο καταβολης κοσμου The question here is ...


8

ὁ ἦν is not Strictly a Violation of Greek Syntax You note something that is not exactly correct: In addition, we find a definite article preceding a finite verb ἦν, which is a violation of Greek syntax. Wallace states of what the article "IS" (emphasis added): At bottom, the article intrinsically has the ability to conceptualize. Or, as Rosén ...


8

It's possible to be a little more emphatic about the connection to Isaiah 63:3 which is routinely cited by commentators as an "intertext" for Revelation 19:13. This is a significant connection because, as noted in the question, this is judgment context, and the "blood" in question is that of the LORD's enemies. But (again, as noted), in Revelation the ...


8

Reading Revelation 19 with chapter 14 As a quick preface, I think the imagery from Revelation 19, of the blood-spattered robe and the winepress, needs to be read in unison with Revelation 14, where we also find the winepress image being used. Some writers are evenly split between Views 1 and 3, described below, with a few actually holding to both. Davïd ...


8

The Book of Revelation had a mixed reception among the early Church Fathers. This is exemplified by Eusebius, who (Ecclesiastical History, VII, xxv) quotes Bishop Dionysius the Great of Alexandria: Some indeed of those before our time rejected and altogether impugned the book, examining it chapter by chapter and declaring it to be unintelligible and ...


8

As a prior answer has examined where Enoch failed in canonicity, this one shall turn to the Book of Revelation to determine what factors led the church to recognize its canonicity. Though a popular genre, few apocalyptic works found their way into the New Testament canon. The most obvious exception comes to the modern world as The Revelation to John or The ...


8

According to a video found here, Shoebat claims he saw this in the Codex Vaticanus, which dates to the 4th century and is one of the two oldest complete New Testament manuscripts still surviving. There are a couple of problems with this claim. First, like all other known manuscripts from the 8th century and prior, Codex Vaticanus was written in all ...


8

Bruce Alderman has given a very good answer to the question. It emerges clearly that Shoebat’s claim about the Vatican manuscript is a blatant fraud. Of course, if he knew anything about Greek he would know that all Greek manuscripts at the time of the composition of Revelation are written in majuscules (capital letters), so there is no way that the original ...


7

There's two important things about interpreting the bible: You must be consistent, and not use a different method for different books of the Bible. (You can't interpret an entire book using one hermeneutic, and another book using an entirely different one. You must find a hermeneutic that you can apply consistently) Let the Bible interpret the Bible. ...


7

All the major witnesses support the reading ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης. This translates into English as "(out) of/ from the great tribulation." The article, in bold face, is present, so the phrase must include the definite article in the English translation. There are some exceptions to translating the Greek definite article into English (e.g., before proper ...


7

It's unlikely that John intended the phrase to refer to the "day of the Lord" as found in the prophets. While the phrase found in Revelation 1:10 isn't found elsewhere in the New Testament, the phrase "day of the Lord" is found in several places. When the phrase is used elsewhere in the New Testament, the grammar matches that found in the prophets. In 1 ...


7

Contemporary Jewish Apocalypses 2 Esdras is a Jewish apocalypse with later Christian additions. One chapter, written by the original Jewish author, has the following: In the thirtieth year after the destruction of the city, I was in Babylon — I, Salathiel, who am also called Ezra. I was troubled as I lay on my bed, and my thoughts welled up in my ...


7

The book was accepted into the canon at the Council of Carthage in 397 AD. It was, at the time when the canon was being constructed, believed to be authored by the Apostle John. Anything written by one of the disciples of Jesus tends to be held sacred. There was some opposition to its inclusion. One of the views against this was that it was one of the ...



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