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Translation From the Apostolic Bible: Your first question is in regards to the translation. It seems that all three would be pretty valid translations. The original Greek for "the beginnings" here is arche: Strings G746 1. beginning, origin 2. the person or thing that commences, the first person or thing in a series, the leader 3. that by ...


12

"Hades" is the Greek word for the realm of the dead. In the Greek Septuagint, it replaces the Hebrew word "Sheol". There's not a lot of description of Hades within the main canon - chiefly the parable in Luke 16 - but generally it is considered the holding place for the souls of the dead until the final judgement. It is sometimes thought to be divided into ...


10

Who are the morning stars? From the text, I would say the morning stars are the sons of God that are mentioned. This passage seemed to follow a common parallel format found in the surrounding text. Look at the repetitious nature of the surrounding passages for my reasoning: 5 Who determined its measurements—surely you know! Or who stretched the line ...


10

I don't think it's as simple as knowing when to take a verse literally or symbolically. I will attempt to propose a hermeneutical approach to the translation of the book of Revelation. I am going to approach the text from a Christian perspective (as this was the intended audience). I would not call these 'rules,' but rather 'principles' of interpretation ...


10

Okay - I'll take a shot at this. [tl;dr: with @rhetorician, I believe "sit" in Rev 17:1 is intended to convey the settledness of a potentate in pomp. This sitting/setting needs to be seen in the immediate context, and in relation to John's use of the Hebrew scriptures.] Principles for interpretation This is "Biblical Hermeneutics.SE", though, so I'll ...


9

Questions on Revelation are extremely difficult to answer because they are so highly based on your view of Revelation, which is too hard to argue for in one post. I don't have the expertise to give a great answer to this question, but I thought I might as well give it a shot since no one else has. As someone who tends towards a partial preterist position, I ...


9

The existing answer already gives the essentials. This variation in reading Revelation 22:14 persists across quite a number of modern English translations. I thought it might help to have a bit of explanation, too, especially if readers have some sense of the textual landscape for the NT. Not for nothing does the introduction to the Nestle-Aland edition ...


9

A bit of history Of the earlier known prophetic texts of Israel, we find a variety of delivery styles: plain oration, song, poetry, etc. There is a fair amount of figurative speech, but the messages are more or less straightforward: God is coming to judge Judah! He will raise up Nebudchadnezzar against Tyre! He will deliver Moab to the Edomites! But during ...


8

One of my favorite sayings in hermeneutics is: The meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. As you indicated in your question, there are many "women" mentioned in the Bible, so to determine which "woman" is being referenced here, we need to look at the context. As we proceed, keep in mind that this is "a great sign in ...


8

According to the NET Translator's notes, The vast majority of witnesses have αὐτούς (autous, “them”) here, while the Textus Receptus reads ἡμᾶς (Jhmas, “us”) with insignificant support (pc gig vgcl sa Prim Bea). There is no question that the original text read αὐτούς here.... The textual problem here between the present tense βασιλεύουσιν ...


8

I know you asked for contextual evidence and I hope to get there. However, when it comes to these sorts of things, contextual (which is part of internal) evidence is really only one of the factors that goes into these sorts of things. overview of internal and external evidence The UBS (4th ed.) also has αὐτοὺς (which is unsurprising given the overlap ...


8

I did look into this for a paper on Revelation and First Enoch (The Canonicity of Apocalyptic Literature). Whenever it was written, Revelation aims to encourage Christians during an imperial persecution. Arguments for a Late Date (A.D. 96) As external evidence they point to the early church writers like Iraneus (Against Heresies 5.30.3), Victorinus of ...


8

I understand you may be looking for an exegesis that fits within your existing view ('that 90% of the Book of Revelations is yet to be fulfilled'). However, I will be offering a more grammatical-historical approach. The Roman Empire destroyed Jerusalem and its temple in 70 AD, an event Jews quickly began comparing to the destruction of Jerusalem and its ...


8

ὁ ἦν is not Strictly a Violation of Greek Syntax You note something that is not exactly correct: In addition, we find a definite article preceding a finite verb ἦν, which is a violation of Greek syntax. Wallace states of what the article "IS" (emphasis added): At bottom, the article intrinsically has the ability to conceptualize. Or, as Rosén ...


8

It's possible to be a little more emphatic about the connection to Isaiah 63:3 which is routinely cited by commentators as an "intertext" for Revelation 19:13. This is a significant connection because, as noted in the question, this is judgment context, and the "blood" in question is that of the LORD's enemies. But (again, as noted), in Revelation the ...


8

Reading Revelation 19 with chapter 14 As a quick preface, I think the imagery from Revelation 19, of the blood-spattered robe and the winepress, needs to be read in unison with Revelation 14, where we also find the winepress image being used. Some writers are evenly split between Views 1 and 3, described below, with a few actually holding to both. Davïd ...


7

ψηφίζω (Strongs G5585) - to count with pebbles, to compute, calculate, reckon; to give one's vote by casting a pebble into the urn; to decide by voting. This is the same word used in Luke 14:28 in which the builder of a tower will "count the cost" to ensure he has enough to complete it. As for its usage in this passage, J. Hampton Keathley, III, the author ...


7

I do not believe that the explanation, "God has made a new type of gold" is sufficient. Firstly, we know that John is able to identify the material as gold, and such an identification could hardly be made if the material were transparent. Secondly, while we might think of gold as the element Au with the atomic number 79, that was not the definition of gold ...


7

There's two important things about interpreting the bible: You must be consistent, and not use a different method for different books of the Bible. (You can't interpret an entire book using one hermeneutic, and another book using an entirely different one. You must find a hermeneutic that you can apply consistently) Let the Bible interpret the Bible. ...


7

All the major witnesses support the reading ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης. This translates into English as "(out) of/ from the great tribulation." The article, in bold face, is present, so the phrase must include the definite article in the English translation. There are some exceptions to translating the Greek definite article into English (e.g., before proper ...


7

For an early date Among the arguments in favor for an early date (i.e. during emperor Nero) is: A temple seems to exist in Rev 11, but the temple was destroyed in AD 70. The counter argument is of course that this temple is a part of a symbolic vision and should not be mixed up with the physical temple. Revelation addresses the tension between the Jews ...


7

The Bible Answers this as "No" Quoting you (all quotations are from prior to editing the "tone" of the question): Is the Urantia Book ("White Stone") foretold in The Book of Revelation 2:17 ? There is no textual evidence to link the "white stone" symbol to the Urantia Book. Such a connection is an arbitrary assertion. Of course, because we are ...


6

The early christians made a tradition out of meeting on "the first day of the week", which is Sunday, because Saturday is the last day of the week (you can compare this to an American calendar which start the week on a Sunday and ends it on a Saturday.) Acts 20:7: On the first day of the week we came together to break bread. Paul spoke to the people ...


6

A white stone was used to gain admission to certain events in Roman times. That would imply that those who overcome will be granted admission to the Kingdom. Source: Found a reference here. That lists its sources as David Stern's Jewish New Testament Commentary and Dr. William Smith's Dictionary of the Bible from 1872. I was also thinking about the ...


6

Here is the list of 12 tribes of Israel from Genesis, Numbers and Revelation: Genesis 29-30 Numbers 1 Revelation 7 Reuben Reuben Reuben Simeon Simeon Simeon Levi Levi Judah Judah Judah Dan Dan Naphtali Naphtali Naphtali Gad Gad ...


6

@H3br3wHamm3r81 has a good answer and I do not intend to replace, but to supplement his answer. οὗτοί εἰσιν οἱ ἐρχόμενοι ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης Lit. "These are the ones coming out of the tribulation, the great one." ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης is a prepositional phrase (preposition->article->noun->article->adjective) that modifies "the ones coming ...


6

Contemporary Jewish Apocalypses 2 Esdras is a Jewish apocalypse with later Christian additions. One chapter, written by the original Jewish author, has the following: In the thirtieth year after the destruction of the city, I was in Babylon — I, Salathiel, who am also called Ezra. I was troubled as I lay on my bed, and my thoughts welled up in my ...


6

An angel as a primeval enemy of humanity The Hebrew noun satan, along with related nouns and verbs, are semi-common in the Hebrew scriptures. These terms are used in a variety of contexts and refer to a variety of individuals. In Numbers 22.22,32, for example, it is an angel explicitly acting on God's behalf who is identified as a satan, meaning ...


6

In Greek, Revelation 13.8 says: ου ου γεγραπται το ονομα αυτου εν τω βιβλιω της ζωης του αρνιου του εσφαγμενου απο καταβολης κοσμου With only a little correction for English syntax, this can be partly translated as: anyone whose name is not written in the scroll of the life of the lamb the slaughtered απο καταβολης κοσμου The question here is ...


6

One issue is that some Greek manuscripts take the Greek phrase και εσταθην επι την αμμον της θαλασσης ("and I stood upon the sand of the sea") and number it as Rev. 12:18, whereas other make it as the beginning of Rev. 13:1. The Greek text produced by Robert I Estienne (1550) states, 12:18 και εσταθην επι την αμμον της θαλασσης 13:1 και ειδον εκ της ...



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