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The word “doubt” in the Greek that is used in the Bible is δισταζω - pronounced distazo. The Greek dictionary defines it as ‘to waver, hesitate’ and the modern English dictionary gives its archaic (ancient) meanings as: to fear; be apprehensive about.to be uncertain about something; be undecided in opinion or belief. A feeling of uncertainty about the ...


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The Idea in Brief The context appears to include both: that is, life despite ("even though") death and life after death. The statement also implies the obverse: those who are alive but do not believe are dead. Discussion The passage occurs as follows in the 28th Revised Edition of Aland's Greek New Testament (2012). John 11:25 (mGNT) 25 εἶπεν αὐτῇ ὁ ...


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The Idea in Brief Jesus compared his death to Jonah, who was in the belly of the great fish for three days and three nights (Matt 12:40). Jonah had related his ordeal not only in terms of having been swallowed by the great fish but also as having been "at the roots of the mountains" (Jonah 2:6); that is, Jonah stated that "the earth with its bars was ...


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Matthew 12:38-40 is often quoted in the context of the timing of Jesus death, burial and resurrection, but seldom is the cryptic nature of Jesus’ reply to the request by his enemies for a sign, alluded to (e.g. the phrase “the heart of the earth” is not a literal phrase). Also, seldom is sufficient attention drawn to precisely who it is that Jesus is ...


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The reconciliation of the four accounts can be understood by knowing the histories of the New Testament gospels. John Dominic Crossan says in The Birth of Christianity, page 109, the theory that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were actually based on Mark's Gospel is held today by a fairly massive consensus of contemporary critical scholarship. However, ...


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It reminds me of Jesus telling the seventy in Luke 10 to "greet no-one". One could translate Mark 16:8 as "They fled, speaking to no-one". I think that could mean the women went straight to the disciples without speaking to anyone on the way. They were understandably afraid to tell people on the way because it would produce danger with the authorities to ...


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The chief thing to notice about the reference to ‘the first resurrection’ in Revelation 20, is that it is contrasted, not with a ‘second resurrection’, but with ‘the second death’ (Rev 20:6). Therefore, understanding what constitutes the ‘second death’ in this passage may throw some light on what ‘the first resurrection' actually refers to. The subjects of ...



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