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This is a question about English usage. The Greek original has “en”, which can be translated as “in, on, at” depending on the context. In modern English we normally say “at” a certain time, “on” a given date, but in Early Modern English one often finds “at” where today we would say “in” or “on”. The Oxford English Dictionary, entry “at” IV 29 a, has a ...


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Short Answer: Paul was not in any way endorsing their action. On the contrary, Paul was bringing this up as evidence of their absurdity. The Corinthians were denying that the dead would be raised... but then they were turning around and getting baptized for them! His point is that they are being ridiculous. Context: The flow of the passage First, Paul ...


5

I believe Paul used the phrase "Baptism for the dead" vs 29, in the context of a spiritual war. I think it means those who "stand in the gap" for (or in the place of) fallen Christian brothers and sisters. I know that sounds a bit odd so let me explain. The Apostle Paul frequently used military terms to describe the Christian's ongoing spiritual battles ...


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Revelation 20:5-6 makes it clear that there are two resurrections: (The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were ended.) This is the first resurrection. Blessed and holy are those who share in the first resurrection. The second death has no power over them, but they will be priests of God and of Christ and will reign with him ...


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It would appear that the crucifixion would have happened on Thursday, rather than Friday. How could the next day be Sabbath? The next day was Passover, a high holy day which was treated as a Sabbath. This would have required two Sabbath day observances back to back and would make sense as to why the women were making their way to the tomb early Sunday ...



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