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13

A little bit of Friday, Saturday and a little bit of Sunday could be properly describe as three days and nights in Biblical language. We think of days as 24 hour periods but they included in their common expressions a 'day' as 'any part of a day, or 'touching any part of a calendar day'. The term 'three days and three nights' was a Jewish expression that ...


8

This is a question about English usage. The Greek original has “en”, which can be translated as “in, on, at” depending on the context. In modern English we normally say “at” a certain time, “on” a given date, but in Early Modern English one often finds “at” where today we would say “in” or “on”. The Oxford English Dictionary, entry “at” IV 29 a, has a ...


6

I am not an expert on Christian scriptures and history, but discussion on other answers on this question led me to enough information to propose an answer. One approach is to count partial days, so "three days and three nights" is understood as "three days, including the nights". If we understand Jesus' death to have been on Friday (the dominant opinion to ...


6

Abstract Paul can't be read to support a non-physical resurrection, in this passage or any other, unless you take his words out of context. N. T. Wright is certainly the person to ask on the topic and he neatly summarizes the argument in an article addressing four reviews of his The Resurrection of the Son of God: [Michael] Goulder, by contrast, ...


5

Short Answer: Paul was not in any way endorsing their action. On the contrary, Paul was bringing this up as evidence of their absurdity. The Corinthians were denying that the dead would be raised... but then they were turning around and getting baptized for them! His point is that they are being ridiculous. Context: The flow of the passage First, Paul ...


5

I believe Paul used the phrase "Baptism for the dead" vs 29, in the context of a spiritual war. I think it means those who "stand in the gap" for (or in the place of) fallen Christian brothers and sisters. I know that sounds a bit odd so let me explain. The Apostle Paul frequently used military terms to describe the Christian's ongoing spiritual battles ...


4

How many resurrections are there? The immediate referent of "first resurrection" is not, "The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were ended." Instead it is those that came to life and reigned with Christ for a thousand years. This is made clear by the fact that the author restates that those who participate in the first ...


4

I think Paul is talking about the future resurrection, but with a very real sense of that future resurrection being something inevitable - giving us certainty, purpose, and hope in the present time. A few verses later we read about having been adopted as sons: 15 For you did not receive the spirit of slavery to fall back into fear, but you have received ...


4

A non-physical resurrection was unheard of in Jewish thinking. To them, a person wasn't just a body, nor was it just a soul/spirit. Just a body would have been an animal. Just a spirit would have been like an angel. A complete person in Jewish thought was a unification of spirit and body--neither an animal nor an angel. (A spiritual resurrection is ...


4

There have been various theories throughout the years as to what this refers. Martin Luther believed it was an ordinary baptism of a living person, but that it occurred over the tomb of the dead. John Calvin saw this as a normal baptism of someone when they were close to death. Another interpretation is that this is a metaphor and someone being baptized ...


4

The "first resurrection" refers to a spiritual resurrection in which the martyred saints come to life in heaven to reign with Christ during the present age. (It's possible that all the saints participate in this, but that the author's purpose is to give encouragement especially to those to whom he is writing facing a possible martyrdom.) I believe this can ...


3

Based on the comments above, I will try the, "most simple answer": The first resurrection is for believers, the second you mention in your question. This second resurrection appears to be for judgement. The first death is natural death. The second is final death after the second resurrection; this second death is apparently hell. Christians, from the ...


2

I'd say they are referring to the same event. It is common in Hebrew language and when thinking like a Hebrew to duplicate ideas. Notice how they parallel: “Truly, truly, I say to you, (A) an hour is coming, and is now here, (B) when the dead will hear the voice of the Son of God, (C) and those who hear will live. (D) For as the Father has life in ...


1

Revelation 20:5-6 makes it clear that there are two resurrections: (The rest of the dead did not come to life until the thousand years were ended.) This is the first resurrection. Blessed and holy are those who share in the first resurrection. The second death has no power over them, but they will be priests of God and of Christ and will reign with him ...


1

It would appear that the crucifixion would have happened on Thursday, rather than Friday. How could the next day be Sabbath? The next day was Passover, a high holy day which was treated as a Sabbath. This would have required two Sabbath day observances back to back and would make sense as to why the women were making their way to the tomb early Sunday ...


1

They say a picture is worth a thousand words. Here is a calendar that presents one one theory of how the events may have transpired that would have been three full days and three full nights. Note the extra day between the Sabbaths during which the women buy and prepare spices.


1

It might be helpful to read this passage in the light of Matthew 5:28-29 Acts 23:6, 24:15 and Daniel 12:1-4. There will be two and only two resurrections, "The JUST and The UNJUST." The JUST being on the LAST DAY of this Age, Jn.6:39, 40, 44, 54 and Matthew 13:39. The UNJUST 1000 years later, Revelation 20:1-6...



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