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I had to outline Stephen's speech to see if he answered the question directly: Abraham was given a promise of a land. His father stood in the way. So Abraham did not receive the inheritance. Joseph was given the promise of a kingdom. His brothers stood in the way. So he did not get the kingdom he looked for (asking for his bones to be carried out of ...


7

Acts 7 takes 8 to 9 minutes to read out loud and most of it is Stephen's speech. So that's a fairly long answer to the question "Are these things so?" However, Acts 6:8-15 makes clear that this speech is essentially Stephen's defense against a charge of blasphemy. From that perspective, he wasn't give much time at all. So what are we to make of this ...


6

Stephen's long and meandering history may not appear to have a point, let alone answer the charges leveled against him. But Stephen is indeed addressing these charges: “This man never ceases to speak words against this holy place and the law, for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs ...


5

No Certain Answer to Give Disclaimer and Explanation of Citations and Notations: The evidence here is largely gleaned from Protestant source material (my tradition), and is presented in a way that argues toward Job being an ancient composition (my view); but the evidence also mentions there are numerous other views on this. A bibliography of all ...


5

To begin, we need to remember something very basic, that is nevertheless taken for granted by modern readers: the ancient world didn't have audio recording. In the specific case of Acts 2, Peter's speech is portrayed as an impromptu reaction to accusations of drunkenness. Short of believing God himself told the author of Acts exactly what Peter said, it is ...


5

Most readers notice the connection between Jude 6 and 2 Peter 2.4, but the similarities go beyond that. Second Peter has a lot more material in between some of the parallels, but the two epistles actually touch on much of the same subject matter, in the same order: Jude 1 = 2 Peter 1.2 Jude 4-5 = 2 Peter 2.1 Jude 6-10 = 2 Peter 2.4-12 Jude 12-13 = 2 Peter ...


4

Historical-grammatical method The historical-grammatical method attempts to re-discover the original meaning of a text as intended by its author. It's "historical" because it tries to place the text in historical context and it's "grammatical" because it closely analyses the grammar of the text to determine meaning. Implicitly, the method assumes the ...


3

The "finger of God" is mentioned in two passages in the Hebrew Bible. Once when the magicians of Pharaoh conceded defeat before Moses (Ex 8:19) and secondly when the two tablets were inscribed with the Ten Commandments (Ex 31:18). In the context at hand here in Matt 12:27-28 and Luke 11:19-20, where we see Jesus casting out the demons, the confrontation ...


1

First, it is a big assumption you have here. While higher criticism gives a general idea of the history of the Bible texts, it is not really able to support such assertions as to specific phrases like these. Second, not necessarily one must assume they transcribed literally what Jesus said to accept both as truthful. The truth is in the meaning, not on ...



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