Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

23

“If their approach was the same I assume they would come to the same theological conclusions” Texts that aren't dense legalese, e.g. books like the Bible which contain stories, parables, philosophies and statues, are necessarily rich with ambiguity and mystery. There is no way that a book like the Bible could unambiguously inform any ...


12

The basic difference is Jesus Christ. That may sound trite or rude, but it needn't be. A Christian hermeneutic that is faithful to itself will base its reading of the Old Testament on the way Jesus and the Apostles used the Old Testament. This hermeneutic was rather shocking even to Jesus' disciples (i.e. Christians) even at that time (and I assume Jewish ...


7

This will be a partial answer, intended primarily as a supplement to this answer, since she mentioned that she is an expert in Jewish approaches but not in Christian approaches. (I can't add anything to her answer on Jewish approaches, so I won't bother trying to cover that material!) There are a variety of Christian approaches to the TaNaKh (i.e. the ...


3

A Fundamental Flaw I believe there is a fundamental flaw in your assumption behind the question itself. Namely (emphasis added): If their approach was the same I assume they would come to the same theological conclusions ... there must be a difference in the methodology and so you ask the question (emphasis added): What are the characteristic ...


3

The key general differences between Jewish and Christian thought concerning the Hebrew Bible (Tanakh) lie not so much in their respective methodologies of interpretation (which are very similar), but the precedent and priority each gives to the respective biblical covenants (Abrahamic, Mosaic, Davidic, and New Covenants). For example, according to the New ...


2

Jewish scholars use the method of Pardes which is an acronym for Pashat, Remez, Drash, Sod. Pashat is the literal interpretation. Christians have learned much from Jewish expositors in this. Rabbinic exposition of the literal meaning is not much different than Christian. Remez looks at hints and follows their lead. For instance, Jesus's quotes of OT ...


2

Didn't see a reference to this great passage anywhere, so I thought I'd tack it on for any future readers. "Then beginning with Moses and with all the prophets, He [Jesus] explained to them [the disciples] the things concerning Himself in all the Scriptures," (NASB, Luke 24:27). Spoken after Jesus's resurrection, but before his ascension, this ...


2

At the seminary I graduated from, we were taught the rules in Dr. Hernanado's Hermeneutics class as part of the history of interpretation. In Dr. Nunnally's Jewish backgrounds to the NT class, we were drilled in them again. They both showed us places in the New Testament where the writers used the rules in their own interpretation. However, we were not ...


1

The Song of Salomon is attributed to Salomon as the author according to verse 1. It is clear to scholars if Salomon is actually speaking from experience. It is more likely that he wrote about the idea romance and the people are supposed to be archetypes. The name of the bride is "Shulamit" (7:1). It has the same hebrew root as Salomon and therefore it is ...


1

1. “Light and heavy” (קל וחומר) - "kal vachomer", i.e. a minori ad majus and vice versa. The first of Hillel’s rules was known as the rule of “light and heavy” and was simply an application of the usual argument of “from the lesser to the greater.” (cf. Gen. 44:8; Ex. 6:12; Num. 12:14 – not explicit but see BK 25a; Deut. 31:27; I Sam. 23:3; Jer. 12:5; ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible