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12

I wrote a paper on James 2:14-26 a few years back. Here's a link. TRANSLATION 14: What (is) the benefit, my brothers and sisters, if someone claims to have faith but does not have works? That faith is not able to save them (is it)? 15: Suppose a brother or a sister is naked and lacking of daily bread, 16: and someone from you (pl.) says to them, “Go ...


9

While punctuation did not exist in the original manuscripts, there are good reasons for preferring in our translations the rendering, "Verily I say unto thee, today shalt thou be with me in paradise." Here are several arguments in support of this conclusion: In "I say unto thee today," the word "today" is rather superfluous. Quite clearly Jesus is talking ...


7

The answer to this question is twofold. Holman Bible Dictionary has an article that explains how quotations are signified in the New Testament. The most common way to identify quotations in the new testament is by wording (especially verbage) that indicates something has been said or written elsewhere or earlier. Quotations From the Scripture/Word: “as ...


6

If you read the text straight through without the division into chapters, chapter 28 seems to flow naturally from the end of 27 -- the chapter division almost seems to be in the middle of a thought. I don't know why the chapters were divided the way they were, but they are not in the original text. Chapters 29-31 read clearly as one discourse. So I don't ...


5

I think this is a clear Matthean addition: And he said to them, “Whoever divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery against her, and if she divorces her husband and marries another, she commits adultery.”—Mark 10:11-12 (ESV) “Everyone who divorces his wife and marries another commits adultery, and he who marries a woman divorced ...


4

Punctuation is more or less an educated guess1, but most modern critical texts (including Byzantine critical texts which are sympathetic to the TR) render this as a question (Ἄρτι πιστεύετε;). As a question, Jesus' words cast doubt on his disciples' faith, which the 1984 NIV translation committee may have wished to avoid. Translating this as a statement, ...


2

Zechariah 1:6 reads: אַךְ דְּבָרַי וְחֻקַּי אֲשֶׁר צִוִּיתִי אֶת-עֲבָדַי הַנְּבִיאִים הֲלוֹא הִשִּׂיגוּ אֲבֹתֵיכֶם But my words and my statutes, which I commanded my servants the prophets, did they not overtake your fathers? So far the translation is without special problems. The language of "laws overtaking" someone is used in Deuteronomy 28:15. ...


2

Zechariah was a prophet to those who had begun to return from their exile in Babylon, which was the ‘judgment that overtook their fathers’, to whom the former prophets cried out. Prophets like Isaiah, Micah and Jeremiah specifically cried out against them before the exile, but all other post exilic prophets did as well. These prophets prophesied that Israel ...


2

You might be interested in Zane Hodges' interpretation of this verse, as presented in his books The Gospel Under Siege, The Epistle of James: Proven Character Through Testing, and in The Grace New Testament Commentary. Basically, Hodges says that the objector's response goes from vv 18-19, and it is meant to be a reductio ad absurdum. Here is how he ...


1

Short Answer: Though it's difficult to say, the NIV is probably correct. It's the narrator, not Jesus, who is most likely speaking in John 3:13-21. Here's why. John appears to be establishing a chiasm between the first and second miracles at Cana. This third-person monologue (3:13-21) is paralleled with a similar monologue after the testimony of John ...


1

These verses are all about cultural context and considering that the written book of James was intended to be read aloud; it is an address. I agree quite a bit with the answer of swasheck, but my translation would differ as follows: The τις of 2:18 could refer to a straw man, but that straw man would be a close facsimile to his living contemporary Rabbis ...


1

While other people have suggested that it is the prophet himself speaking - in which case the passage shouldn't be in quotes - it seems best to me to understand the speaker to be God quoting Ephraim and Judah after he has carried through with the things prophesied at the end of chapter 5. God speaking in verse 5:14 says: For I will be like a lion to ...



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