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From the apparatus of the Oxford Jewish Study Bible (2nd ed): As in many psalms, the end of a prayer of an individual becomes a prayer for the community. A v[erse] beginning with the letter “pe” follows the acrostic (see also Ps. 34.23). It has been suggested that this arrangement makes the first letter “alef,” the middle letter “lamed,” and the ...


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And this psalm describes what 'the way of the righteous' consists of: studying Torah (v. 2).


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The scriptural hope has always been to live with God in the promised land in the middle east on the dry land above the abyss and below the sky ceiling: Gen 13:15 because I'm going to give you and your descendants all of the land that you see—forever! The promise was not going to be realized by all of the Jews but was conditioned on obedience: ...


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The reason that the translations are all over the map is: Some Hebrew manuscripts connect the first word of the following verse with the last word of Psalm 42:5, yielding the phrase "My ever-present help, my God" The meaning of the Hebrew of Psalm 42:11 is uncertain. The above is pointed out in the apparatus of the JPS Tanakh in the Oxford Jewish Study ...


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The Oxford Jewish Study Bible translators suggest that a better translation of the Hebrew of Psalm 1:6 is: For the LORD cherishes the way of the righteous, but the way of the wicked is doomed. If this is accurate, it would address your questions, I think.


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In 1st Corinthians 14:21, Paul quotes Isaiah 28:11 and refers to it as 'The law' This widens the concept of just what the law is. I think that the same thing happens in Romans 3:19. One thing that we can know is this; Jesus did not make a mistake when He referred to the Psalms as the law...this tells me that we are safe to expand our concept of the term....


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When is "this day" As you rightly note, Psalms 2:7 is quoted multiple times throughout the new Testament. Clearly this had special significance to the New Testament audience. One reason for this can be seen in verse 1 which reads: ἵνα τί ἐφρύαξαν ἔθνη καὶ λαοὶ ἐμελέτησαν κενά (LXX) לָמָּה רָגְשׁוּ גֹויִם וּלְאֻמִּים יֶהְגּוּ־רִֽיק׃ (MT) Why do ...


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Traditionally, all of the Tanak can be referred to as Torah. The word "Torah" is a tricky one, because it can mean different things in different contexts. In its most limited sense, "Torah" refers to the Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. But the word "torah" can also be used to refer to the entire Hebrew Bible (...


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I will try to answer from a Patristic perspective. Regarding your question, "Was 'this day' some time in eternity past; ie, 'from everlasting'? Or is it referring to a day in history?" as referred to in Psalm 2, I think the answer is yes to both. On the one hand, as Son of God, He is unoriginate. Augustine wrote in his "Discourse on Psalm 2": It is ...


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I will declare the decree: the LORD hath said unto me, Thou art my Son; this day have I begotten (יְלִדְתִּֽיךָ) thee. (Psalm 2:7 KJV) The most common meaning of the verb יָלַד is to father or to give birth. There are other uses which do not involve child birth: Joseph saw Ephraim’s children to the third generation. The children of Machir, the son of ...


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Virgin Birth? "And Jesus himself began to be about thirty years of age, being (ὢν: being) as (ὡς: as, just as) was supposed (ἐνομίζετο: was supposed) the son of Joseph, which was the son of Heli" Luke 3:23 First, I think it's important to know who Yeshua's biological father was. According to trinitarian doctrine, Joseph is not the biological ...



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