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In Hebrew, the first "Lord" is Yahweh (God's name), and the second "Lord" really means Lord. So the text is "Yahweh said to my Lord." The way Peter uses the words in Acts 2:34 seems to indicate that the second Lord is the Messiah. This is also corroborated by Matthew 22:42-45.


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While reading links to add to this question, I ran across Gesenius’ explanation (§129 c.), which seems to be too much of an answer to incorporate into the question. I therefore offer it as an answer, although I have a sense that it’s up for disputing, and I’d love to see other answers incorporating more recent scholarship. Gesenius labels this lamed ...


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Gesenius lexicon for Strong's 3050 has a slightly expanded explanation. There either יַהֲַוֹה or יַהְַוֶה is allowed to be an earlier pronounciation of YHWH, and the form Yah is explained by apocope to יָהוּ and then by omission of the unaccented וּ to the final יָהּ. As a further evidence, Gesenius points that "these forms are used promiscuously" (sic) at ...


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It seems to me that there are two interconnected problems raised by the formulation of the question. I think it would help to disentangle them: "meek" v. "humble" The question of contrasting "meek" and "humble" is bound up with changing English usage. "meek" tends to be somewhat quaint in usage, and certainly not so prevalent in English usage as it once ...


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The Idea in Brief The Hebrew verb to pierce (כָּרָה = H3738) in Psalm 40:6 is the same triliteral root for the Hebrew verb to prepare (כָּרָה = H3739). For example, this second verb (כָּרָה = H3739) appears translated in 2 Ki 6:23 as "prepared." In other words, both verbs have the exact same triliteral root, but have different meanings. The LXX translators ...


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Mark S. Smith says, in 'Taking Inspiration', published in Psalms and Practice, page 262, that Psalm 2 may be viewed as a psalm of instruction [for the king of Judah]. Gerald H. Wilson goes further in 'Songs for the City' (ibid, page 236) and says that in Psalm 2, God is described as defining the proper role for the righteous ruler. Extrapolating from these ...


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The Masoretic Text provides clues as to how to read and understand this verse. First, the Masoretes provided a system of cantillation and accent marks, which had signaled to the listener (and reader) the Hebrew hierarchy of thought for every single verse of the Hebrew Bible. For example, the following parse provides the schematic understanding of how the ...


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It appears that the LXX translator (rather than the NETS translator) "saw" a different text here. Typically זד gets translated (as you would expect), with something reflecting "insolent" or nasty:1 παράνομος : Ps 86[85]:14; 119[118]:85 ὑπερήφανος : Ps 119[118]:21, 51, 69, 78, 122 θρασύς : Prov 21:24 ἄνομος : Isa 13:11 On three occasions, however, there ...


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Jewish authorities are split on this. As mentioned in his verse-by-verse lecture on this Psalm, my late rabbi, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt'l, offered both the view that: (1) this Psalm is about David himself, according to Rashi and the Redak, and the wicked nations are the Phillistines; and (2) this Psalm is a prophetic discussion where the king described is ...


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Psalm 90 is unique in that it is the only psalm that has a superscription that identifies it as having been written by Moses. Mark S. Smith says in 'Taking Inspiration', published in Psalms and Practice (edited by Stephen Breck Reid), page 245, that the scholarly consensus is that the superscriptions we see on many of the psalms are prose additions to the ...


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I could be wrong but I believe you are assuming that the LXX is translated from the Masoretic and thus this would seem a poor translation of the MT, However, The 72 translators of the LXX did not use the MT to translate the LXX. There is not a surviving copy of the Hebrew that the LXX was translated from and thus your question as I understand it cannot be ...


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I would argue that "through" as it appears in Psalm 23:4 does not include "coming out of" as its primary meaning. The theme of Psalm 23 is about trusting in G-d during adversity, but not necessarily after it. The majority of the psalm is set in the imperfect tense, which implies incomplete actions happening in the present, or actions which will occur at ...


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Short Answer No, the Bible does not teach that the earth is flat. Authorial Intent If we want to understand what the Bible teaches, we have to start by asking what the authors were trying to communicate to their original intended audiences. We can not start with our own questions and try to "see what the Bible says about it". This is something you learn ...


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The same two words: φόβος (fear) and τρόμος (trembling) are used (in different cases, as dictated by the context) in Phil. 2:12 and in the Greek version (Septuagint) of Ps. 2:11 and Ps. 55:5. So yes, it is likely that the author of Philippians is alluding to these two Psalms. Phil. 2:12: μετα φόβου καὶ τρόμου Ps. 2:11: ἐν φόβῳ καὶ (…) ἐν τρόμῳ Ps. 55:5: ...


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The Targum Psalms provides some clues. The Targums were amplified translations of the Hebrew Scriptures into Aramaic. That is, they provide some nuance as to how the Hebrew Scriptures were understood by Jewish scholars who translated the texts from Biblical Hebrew into Aramaic. The Targum Psalms is Late Jewish Literary Aramaic, and therefore appeared as ...


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The fulfilment of Psalm 69:21 in John 19:28-29 Properly speaking John 19:28 and the 'I thirst' statement of John 19:28 is linked to Ps 69:3 which says: "I am weary with my crying; My throat is dry; My eyes fail while I wait for my God." it is John 19:29 that could be linked to Ps 69:21, the commentator notes: The connection of the Markan Death Story, ...


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There has been much argument as to whether the relevant word is correctly translated as 'lion' or 'pierced', because the Hebrew words (transliterated as kaari and kaaru) are almost indistinguishable. Both Christian and Jewish scholars have concluded that translating the passage with 'lion' (kaari) is meaningless and kaari is not supported by the earliest ...


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In Mark 12:35-37, Jesus has not yet declared himself to be the Messiah, in fact he never really does in this gospel. The important thing is that the audience of Mark's Gospel has already been told that Jesus is the Messiah, or Christ. So, when Jesus talks about the Messiah, the audience knows that he is talking about himself, but the scribe does not. The ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a guru on Hebrew Poetry. Parsing Psa 19:3(4) Psa 19:3(4) אֵֽין־אֹ֭מֶר וְאֵ֣ין דְּבָרִ֑ים בְּ֝לִ֗י נִשְׁמָ֥ע קוֹלָֽם׃ Psa. 19:4 אין־ Particle adverb nothing, is not אמר Noun common masculine singular speech ו Particle conjunction and אין Particle adverb ...


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The Idea in Brief The Greek term ὠδίν appears to carry the idea of confinement, which results in anguish. For example, the pregnant woman is "trapped" in pain, and thus anguish. The city inhabitants are "trapped" by their attackers, and thus anguish. Jonah is "trapped" in Sheol, and thus anguish. The use of this term in the Christian New Testament therefore ...


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There seems to be no consensus as to just when the superscripts were added to the psalms, other than that they were probably not all added at the same time, and that they were not always fixed but evolved, not being considered sacred in the way the psalm texts were. I looked up Mark S. Smith's paper, 'Taking Inspiration:Authorship, Revelation, and the Book ...


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The answer is no, because there is no real evidence that King David wrote any of the psalms attributed to him. James Luther Mays says in Psalms, page 9, that the personal identities of the authors of the Psalms are unknown. He says the quest for the origin of individual psalms leads to occasions in Israel's public exercise of religion, not to their authors. ...


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The "yoke" was in fact the law. To understand this we must examine the purpose, the requirements of, and the ultimate fulfillment of Mosaic Law. The Mosaic Law, given to Moses at Mt. Sinai, was a works based covenant entered into by God and His people the Children of Israel. The law was never intended for gentiles. It was given specifically to the ...


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Psalm 44 was written during the Babylonian Exile, at a time of despair for the Jews, but hope that God would rescue them. Verse 11 tells us that the Jews have been defeated and scattered among the heathens, which can only be a reference to the Exile: 44:11:Thou hast given us like sheep appointed for meat; and hast scattered us among the heathen. God ...


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Both translations are suitable! But they indicate the original Hebrew has a deeper meaning than can be conveyed in one sentence of English. The two main issues here is the meaning of the word "lack" and how to best translate that from the imperfective. The details: The first verse contains four Hebrew words, two phrases of two words each. The first says ...


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It refers to the things that shine in the night sky that are not the "lesser light" (the moon). So, the Hebrew "stars" would also include the wandering stars that we refer to as planets, as well as the distant suns that we label as stars proper. To the Hebrew, they were all "stars".


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The Idea in Brief The Masoretic Text does not indicate here the appearance of the consecutive waw with the Hebrew verb יָשַׁב (to dwell) but instead the consecutive waw with the Hebrew verb שׁוּב (to return). This conclusion comes from the marginalia of the Masoretic Text, which is the Massorah Parva. Discussion The Masoretic Text of the verse appears as ...


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The rod and the staff are both objects used by Shepards to tend their sheep. This is my take since it is the rod I have researched for "spare the ROD and spoil the child." It is depicted as a long staff with a claw type hook on the end. Perhaps they are one tool having different ends. The rod being used to reach out and gently tap the sheep getting away ...


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Thy rod and thy staff they comfort me. Staff is of a mental persuasion. While the rod is of a physical one. It is the Lord's way sometimes to use a gentle prodding with his children when applying correction. On the other hand, it is the Lord's way of not spoiling his children when he wants to show great love towards those he love a stout rod will do because ...



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