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10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


8

Interesting - the relevant bit of Psalm 23:4 is: גַּם כִּי־אֵלֵךְ בְּגֵיא צַלְמָוֶת gam kî-ʾēlēk bĕgêʾ ṣalmāwet As Briggs & Briggs translate, "Yea, when I walk in a gloomy ravine..." The preposition bĕ- has its basic meaning as "in" (in Brown-Driver-Briggs, and Driver did the "bĕ-" entry). The meaning "through" isn't listed, although it is by ...


6

"Born" is usually a conjugation of the verb ילד. However, in Hebrew, different words can have an overlap in meaning, and this appears to be the case with יחם. While יחם simply means "to be hot" (cp. Eze. 24:11), it may also be used idiomatically in the realm of sexuality, meaning "to be aroused." This phenomenon is not unlike that which occurs in many other ...


6

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


6

The question is really an issue of what kind of cosmology the authors of the various biblical books assume in the course of their writing. When we read the Hebrew scriptures, the few books that have anything to say on the subject never explicitly say 'the earth is flat'. But if we can determine the overall shape of the cosmos as the different writers ...


5

First off -- what an amazing psalm! I think it's important never to forget the greatness of the literature we're digging into when we (rightly!) ask our carefully focussed and technical questions. When we've arrived at our answer (if we can), our appreciation ought to be enhanced and deepened. And sorry: I meant this to be a quick one. Three questions ...


5

In Psa. 100:1, the psalmist commands, "All the earth, shout to Yahveh!" Hence, the subject is "all the earth" (כָּל הָאָרֶץ) (cp. Psa. 33:8, 66:4, 96:1, 96:9, etc.). To the same subject, "all the earth," the psalmist commands (Psa. 100:2), "Serve Yahveh with gladness!" (עִבְדוּ אֶת יַהְוֶה בְּשִׂמְחָה) and "Come in His presence with exultation!" (בֹּאוּ ...


5

In Hebrew and other Semitic languages, it is standard for a group of males and females (even if there is only one male and the rest females) to be referred to by a masculine-gendered noun or pronoun. The Hebrew word is אַחִים (achim) in Psalms 133:1, meaning "brothers," but this is not necessarily to the exclusion of females, due to the rule mentioned above. ...


5

I cannot explain why two different translators would come up with different meanings except to say they had different agendas. One agenda, I'm afraid, is the concept that sex is dirty or wrong, and the second is the Christian concept of "original sin." Neither of these is accepted in a Jewish reading of the Hebrew. With JPS translation, it is as follows: ...


5

The Septuagint, a Greek translation of the most significant Hebrew scriptures, completed by 100 BC at the latest, chose to translate 'elohim as αγγελους (that is, 'angels') in Psalm 8.5 (actually verse number 8.6 in the LXX). In the second half of the first century, the author of Hebrews cites the Septuagint translation exactly, reiterating the opinion that ...


4

Unicorn is a correct translation. Noah Webster's 1828 dictionary says that a unicorn is a rhinoceros, and a rhinoceros is a unicorn. The Latin Vulgate says "rinocerotis" in Deut 33:17 and "rinoceros" in Job 39:9. The King James says "Or Rhinocerots" in the marginal note in Isaiah 34:7. Even scientists today use the word unicorn in reference to the ...


4

Psalm 136 uses a repeating refrain, not just the noted two verses: כִּי לְעוֹלָם חַסְדּוֹ The last word, chasdo (3pm possesive, from chesed), is generally translated as "kindness" or "loving kindness". The word "grace" is a different word, chein. See, for example, Psalm 145:8: חַנּוּן וְרַחוּם יְהוָה The LORD is gracious, and full of ...


4

This is the same phrase that appears in Ex 34:6, the interaction between God and Moshe after the golden calf. In both places אֶ֖רֶךְ אַפַּ֣יִם is sometimes translated "slow to anger" (though there is no infinitive verb there) and sometimes "long-suffering". אֶ֖רֶךְ is Strong's H750, "prolong, lengthen, draw out" (etc). אַפַּ֣יִם is H639. The lexicon ...


4

When Ezekiel was written The book of Ezekiel consists of thirteen sections, each dated by the number of years since 'the exile of Jehoiachin' (597 BC), beginning in the fifth year. The total span of time for Ezekiel's recorded prophecies was about twenty-two years (c. 592-570). Features of Psalm 137 This Psalm doesn't tell us exactly when it was ...


3

As a matter of semantics, the Hebrew word עלם ('olam) means something more like the English words 'age' or 'era', in the sense of a distant time period. עלם is occasionally translated as 'everlasting' or 'eternal', with a meaning of 'age-enduring'. For example, some passages describe hills or mountains as עלם (Genesis 49.26; Deuteronomy 33.15; Habakkuk ...


3

Consider one of the sayings I grew up with: "He who laughs last, laughs best!" More on that later. Theologians speak of anthropomorphisms, and rightly they should. God the Father does not have body parts, for one thing; He can, however, see and hear. "He who planted the ear, does He not hear? He who formed the eye, does He not see?" (Psalm ...


3

Exegesis Gesenius1 and Adam Clarke2 interpreted the phrase שִׁיר יְדִידֹת (shir yediot) in Psa. 45:1 as signifying an epithalamium.3 In this epithalamium, the psalmist writes about a bride and a bridegroom; therefore, the object of the psalmist's epithalamium changes a few times throughout the chapter. First, the psalmist writes concerning the king, i.e. ...


3

We need to explore the word אף more closely. It has two general meanings: nose, face, nostril (Genesis 2:7, Proverbs 30:33, Genesis 28:12, Samuel I 25:23, Chronicles II 7:3) and anger (Deuteronomy 29:27, Proverbs 30:33, Daniel 11:20, Zephaniah 2:2, Genesis 30:2). Why this is the case is left to your interpretation. On this point I agree with this answer - ...


3

Yes the custom of raising the right hand was a customary gesture of a person taking an oath, implying that he appeals to God as a witness to the truth of his affirmation. From man to God: But Abram said to the king of Sodom, “With raised hand I have sworn an oath to the LORD, God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth, that I will accept nothing ...


3

I realize this is based on the 'opinion' of the 'Sages' from 'Rashi's commentary, but I found it interesting and thought I would share it with you. More interesting as I was just reading this Q & A, and then 'stumbled' upon the next website as I am researching Psalm 23 for myself. from: ...


3

It seems likely that Ps 72:20, "The prayers of David the son of Jesse are ended", refers to the completion of an early collection of Davidic psalms. The evidence does not really fit together seamlessly, but still converges on this conclusion. The text reads: כָּלּוּ תְפִלּוֹת דָּוִד בֶּן־יִשָׁי kālû tĕphillôt dāwīd ben yišāy1 (1) Ps 72:20 follows a ...


3

The כִי- (-kî) 2nd fem sg suffix (which appears also in vv. 3 and 5) is explained as simply a rare (or possibly Aramaizing) form of the suffix: see Gesenius Kautzsch Cowley, §58g (for the verb) and §91e for the noun. Basically the same explanation is given in Joüon-Muraoka, at §61i (verb), and §94i (noun). See also p. 269 of Geoffrey Khan's discussion of ...


2

This verse is quoted in the Apostolic Constitutions,1 but is referenced as Ps. 145:17 in the scripture index. Although the writer is specifically speaking of the faithfulness of the words of Jesus and not the faithfulness of all his works as in v. 17. By quoting this verse, the unknown author of the Constitutions shows that the verse was known in at least ...


2

I believe that the text indicates that David wrote it in a reflectory fashion. In the annotation, the noun "טַ֭עְמוֹ" "his behavior" is the key to this. This noun is also used in 1 Samuel 21:14. The interesting thing about this noun is that it can also mean "taste", e.g. "אִם־יֶשׁ־טַ֝֗עַם בְּרִ֣יר חַלָּמֽוּת׃" "or is there any taste in the white of an ...


2

The Septuagint gives: ... en anomiais synelempsthen kai en hamartiais ekkisesen me he meter mou ... amidst lawlessness I was conceived and in erroneous expectations my mother longed with burning for me It is not very likely that David intended to blame his mother for his own fault. With more probability he admitted the shame of one who was hoped for in ...


2

Firstly, even if the reference to "right" is to the right arm as part of an oath, I'm not sure how one could conclude they raised the arm. Maybe they just held it sideways or against their body or some such. Most Hebrew commentaries (Radak, Ibn Ezra, Metsudat David) explain "right" to be metaphorical - the right being typically stronger than the left, ...


2

It seems not, but then again in some ways your impression is quite valid. The following verse shows the scene is not a group of women entering his bedroom, but "With gladness and rejoicing shall they be brought: they shall enter into the king's palace." The idea is typical of ancient Jewish weddings that commonly had attendants carrying on festive roles ...


2

The idea of "chesed" (חֶסֶד) in the Hebrew Bible not only includes the idea of lovingkindness, but also of discipline. Moses indicated that the Lord would discipline the Israelites "as a father to his son" in the following verses-- Deut 8:2-5 (NASB) 2 You shall remember all the way which the Lord your God has led you in the wilderness these forty ...



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