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The Masoretic Text provides clues as to how to read and understand this verse. First, the Masoretes provided a system of cantillation and accent marks, which had signaled to the listener (and reader) the Hebrew hierarchy of thought for every single verse of the Hebrew Bible. For example, the following parse provides the schematic understanding of how the ...


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The Idea in Brief The Hebrew verb to pierce (כָּרָה = H3738) in Psalm 40:6 is the same triliteral root for the Hebrew verb to prepare (כָּרָה = H3739). For example, this second verb (כָּרָה = H3739) appears translated in 2 Ki 6:23 as "prepared." In other words, both verbs have the exact same triliteral root, but have different meanings. The LXX translators ...


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Disclaimer: I am not a guru on Hebrew Poetry. Parsing Psa 19:3(4) Psa 19:3(4) אֵֽין־אֹ֭מֶר וְאֵ֣ין דְּבָרִ֑ים בְּ֝לִ֗י נִשְׁמָ֥ע קוֹלָֽם׃ Psa. 19:4 אין־ Particle adverb nothing, is not אמר Noun common masculine singular speech ו Particle conjunction and אין Particle adverb ...


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The Targum Psalms provides some clues. The Targums were amplified translations of the Hebrew Scriptures into Aramaic. That is, they provide some nuance as to how the Hebrew Scriptures were understood by Jewish scholars who translated the texts from Biblical Hebrew into Aramaic. The Targum Psalms is Late Jewish Literary Aramaic, and therefore appeared as ...


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I could be wrong but I believe you are assuming that the LXX is translated from the Masoretic and thus this would seem a poor translation of the MT, However, The 72 translators of the LXX did not use the MT to translate the LXX. There is not a surviving copy of the Hebrew that the LXX was translated from and thus your question as I understand it cannot be ...



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