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I was recently struck by the Psalmist's regard for the law of God in Psalm 1, 19, 119, and Psalm 40:8, "I delight to do thy will, O my God: yea, thy law is within my heart." It occurred to me that God's laws could not possibly be what Peter referred to in the Jerusalem council when he said "Now therefore, why do you test God by putting a yoke on the neck of ...


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The "yoke" was in fact the law. To understand this we must examine the purpose, the requirements of, and the ultimate fulfillment of Mosaic Law. The Mosaic Law, given to Moses at Mt. Sinai, was a works based covenant entered into by God and His people the Children of Israel. The law was never intended for gentiles. It was given specifically to the ...


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Psalm 44 was written during the Babylonian Exile, at a time of despair for the Jews, but hope that God would rescue them. Verse 11 tells us that the Jews have been defeated and scattered among the heathens, which can only be a reference to the Exile: 44:11:Thou hast given us like sheep appointed for meat; and hast scattered us among the heathen. God ...


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Both translations are suitable! But they indicate the original Hebrew has a deeper meaning than can be conveyed in one sentence of English. The two main issues here is the meaning of the word "lack" and how to best translate that from the imperfective. The details: The first verse contains four Hebrew words, two phrases of two words each. The first says ...


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It refers to the things that shine in the night sky that are not the "lesser light" (the moon). So, the Hebrew "stars" would also include the wandering stars that we refer to as planets, as well as the distant suns that we label as stars proper. To the Hebrew, they were all "stars".



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