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An apple is a fruit,silver and gold are treasures and a word fitly spoken is a word that is a treasure.


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It's interesting to note that the Hebrew word that has been translated into "fitly" is 'owphan and is strong's number H212. It appears 36 times in the OT. Only ONCE though does it appear as the word fitly, with all the other 35 times being translated into the word wheel. Strong's Lexicon also says the word comes from an unused root meaning to revolve. It's ...


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The parallelism is clearer in the original than in the translation you quoted. A literal, wooden translation would be something like this: Apples of gold in carvings of silver - A word spoken in its circumstances Word is parallel to apples of gold, while the [appropriate] circumstances is parallel to the carvings of silver. Waltke in NICOT ...


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Much of Proverbs is presented in the form of analogy, and the challenge therein is that the strength of the message is limited by the clarity of the comparison. Let's examine the apple reference first. Fruit, and more often the specificity of the fig are used to symbolize prosperity. In the New Testament, it references prosperity of the spirit in verses ...


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The NKJV and NIV have "settings" of silver, calling to mind a piece of jewelry. The setting holds the gem in place, so it won't fall out and get lost. The apple of Gold is the wise teaching, ruling, decision. Because it was fitly spoken - delivered at the right time in a sensitive and appropriate way to one ready to receive it - it becomes set - appropriated ...


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The phrase is translated correct. Train up a child in the way he should go, And when he is old he will not depart from it. There is nothing in the text indicating a vocation by which a child is to be trained or dedicated except in the way "he should go." The Scriptures are consistent that "the way" is the way that is right before God (Psa. 119:133; ...



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