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6

Great question! I had never thought about that before, so I dug in a little. And as I examined the passage, I found a very significant literary device that I had never previously noticed: Set Proverbs 7 and 8 side-by-side and you will notice several remarkable similarities/parallels between the two passages. Both present a long speech by a woman. Both women ...


5

The books of the Septuagint (= LXX, here not the Septuagint "proper", which is limited to the Pentateuch, but the whole of the Jewish scriptures in Greek) were produced by different translators; the various books thus exhibit vastly different styles and approaches to the task. LXX-Proverbs is well known for being among the most "free" in making the Hebrew ...


5

With above sentences the writer (not sure if this is Agur or the son of Jakeh) is talking about the 7th and 4th item. For example: 3 things amazes him and there is even a 4th thing that amazes him even more. The book of Proverbs is completely in poetic form. It contains different variations and combinations of basic forms of parallelism, a distinguishing ...


4

Why is Wisdom personified as a woman? That's a straightforward question that admits of no simple answer. Nor is it possible to answer it from within the Hebrew Bible itself. And, it must be added, all answers to this "why?" question contain an element of speculation. This is "Biblical Hermeneutics.SE", so it is important to identify the kind of ...


3

The Hebrew word used in Psalm 16:33 is גּוֹרָל, which refers to stones which were cast to get a decision. Garments were also used sometimes. The word can also be used as a metaphor for 'destiny.'1 The IVP commentary explains that casting lots "is a form of divination in which the assumption is that God will determine the cast and thus provide the answer ...


3

Yes, the Septuagint reflects an earlier version of the Hebrew Bible than the Masoretic text. Fragments of a pre-Masoritic version of the consonantal text of the Hebrew Old Testament have been discovered in Qumran (Dead Sea Scrolls); the consonantal text was canonised in the 1st century CE; the vocalised (Tiberian, Palestinian and Babylonian) versions were ...


2

In English we have three genders: masculine, feminine, and neuter - "he", "she", and "it". Hebrew only has masculine and feminine. So just as a German would call a house a "he" because the word "house" in German is masculine in gender, so Hebrew calls wisdom "she" because it is feminine in gender. So when personified, wisdom becomes a woman. Short ...


2

The Idea in Brief Liars tell lies, but the false witness also includes those who may tell the truth, but are malicious people who therefore "lie" against the truth. When liars lie, they are false witnesses, but not all false witnesses tell lies (notwithstanding that they still "lie" against the truth). The Book of James provides the framework for ...


2

Shift of Emphasis and Focus The same Hebrew word (שֶׁ֫קֶר; shěqěr)1 is used for both "lying" and "false" in those verses from the ESV, so there is a definite relationship between them, but also a difference of emphasis. Note how the first five abominations relate to things done with the body (eyes, tongue, hands, heart, feet). These focus on "parts" of a ...


1

It is more accurate to describe this "n + 1" pattern in biblical poetry in terms of "rhetoric" (or "stylistics") rather than a "figure of speech" which normally has to do with non-literal language (e.g., metaphor, simile). Although "graded numerical sayings", as they are sometimes called, are found not only in wisdom literature (like the examples given by ...



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