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5

This has been called "The Most Obscure Verse in Proverbs". Textual and/or translational uncertainties involve nearly every word in the verse1 and they are to some extent inseparable if we want to end up with a coherent proverb. However, the OP has specifically asked about the translation "archer", so I'll focus on that and only briefly mention some of the ...


4

I am seeing parallelism here. There is a two-fold disobedience; one in disobeying the father by mocking and the other in disobeying the mother by disregarding her direction. I lean towards your thought on emphasis. The parallelism in the second part of the proverb gives a two-fold response to the two-fold disobedience. That being said, the particular ...


2

The Idea in Brief The Masoretic Text for this passage contains marginalia written in Palestinian Aramaic which will cue the reader to understand the verse according to how the Masoretic scholars understood the text. Based on this marginalia, the following translation is how the Masoretic scholars understood this verse. Proverbs 22:6 6 [The example of] ...


2

The parallelism is clearer in the original than in the translation you quoted. A literal, wooden translation would be something like this: Apples of gold in carvings of silver - A word spoken in its circumstances Word is parallel to apples of gold, while the [appropriate] circumstances is parallel to the carvings of silver. Waltke in NICOT ...


2

Much of Proverbs is presented in the form of analogy, and the challenge therein is that the strength of the message is limited by the clarity of the comparison. Let's examine the apple reference first. Fruit, and more often the specificity of the fig are used to symbolize prosperity. In the New Testament, it references prosperity of the spirit in verses ...


2

This seems to have been a particularly difficult passage to translate, or at least one that challenges understanding of ancient Jewish morals. It seems that every Bible has a different translation - in some cases very different from any other - but I notice that several translations are more or less in agreement with the New International Version, which also ...


1

The wording of some of these translations is understandably confusing. Of the interpretations you identify, I think the second and third options are most defensible since either meaning fits the context, so I'll focus on them. The second option speaks to the character of the man. Such that, being reduced to a loaf of bread or being brought to a loaf of ...


1

The phrases "put up security" and to "hold it in pledge" both have to due with the system of credit in ancient Israel. Their system was similar to the modern one with one major difference. Today we go to a bank(a business that provides loans), but banking had not been 'invented' yet so a person would have to obtain a loan from someone they knew. Giving ...


1

From the Lexham Hebrew interlinear Bible we can see that the sorrow is specifically prevented (not added) while the riches are added: Therefore it stands to reason that when God physically blesses a godly person, he also takes care of the soul and prevents many sorrows, curses and temptations that would often accompany the outward prosperity of the ...



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