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6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

In this context, the Greek ὠδῖνες refer to the birth pangs a woman experiences while in labor. Basically, the Jews referred to these by the phrase חבלי דמשיח 1 or חבלו של משיח,2 literally "the birth pangs of the Messiah." They are not birth pangs that the Messiah himself experiences (a subjective genitive, if you will), but birth pangs that Israel ...


6

Prophecy for Israel can come from the mouths of anyone, even gentiles (Bila'am). The prophecy in Hosea refers to divine retribution in the form of destruction of the two temples (two days), and a future raising of the third temple and restoration of Israel's worship through it (third day). On the "days" passage (v2), Rashi says: He will revive us from ...


4

In Hebrew writing, it is common to express the same idea twice but using two different phrasings or metaphors. For example, in Micah 4:3, the prophet writes: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares,     and their spears into pruning hooks; The same idea is given twice: instruments of war will become instruments of ...


4

Regarding the phrase, "And YHVH said to the children of Yisra'el," Rabbi David Kimchi wrote, על ידי נביא, that is, "by the hands of a prophet" (cp. Jdg. 6:8). One should recall that the Israelites pleaded with God that He no more speak to them personally (Exo. 20:19 cp. Deut. 18:15-19). So, in particular contexts where it seems as though God is speaking to ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


3

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


3

Dan. 2:40 And the fourth kingdom shall be as strong as iron, inasmuch as iron breaks in pieces and shatters everything; and like iron that crushes, that kingdom will break in pieces and crush all the others. Dan. 2:41 Whereas you saw the feet and toes, partly of potter’s clay and partly of iron, the kingdom shall be divided; yet the strength of the iron ...


3

This turns, I think, on a question of how personal names worked in the time period. There may not be a simple answer to your question. As you've noticed, the name is a short phrase, and the terminal element is theophoric. Semantically, the two versions mean the same thing, and may well have been interchangeable in conversation, or variable in regional ...


3

Contextually, the Mark of the Beast refers to the beast which has the fatal wound on one of its heads. This would seem to be the beast arising from the sea. Verses 12, 14b, 15 seem to support this in that the second beast will make the earth worship the first beast (v12), commanded the people to make a statue to honor the first beast (vv14b, 15). It would ...


2

While I am almost persuaded by the suggestion that the "day" of Amos 8:9 could be 2 August, 2027 -- which I note will be a Bank holiday in Scotland (significant?)1 -- I do believe there is a different, "real" answer to this question, of a sort. tl;dr : My sense is that the "day" described in Amos 8:9 is the same "day" as described in Amos 5:18 (so, for the ...


2

It is almost too easy of a question. As Amos "sees" the word of the Lord, there is a chronology throughout the vision. The condemnations pronounced are not only directed toward Israel, but also to her enemies. In all the judgment statements throughout the prophets, we find this statement, "In that day..." over 100 times. The chronology is simple. 1. God ...


2

I'd like to add the words of Philo, who lived in the 1st century A.D. In Concerning Noah's Work as a Planter (De Plantatione), Ch. XXV, Sec. 107-108, Philo writes, 107 For some persons have fancied the sacrificing of oxen to be piety, and they assign a portion of all that they steal or obtain by denials, or by cheating their creditors, or by plundering, ...


2

My wife summarizes it well: "Sometimes, saying 'sorry' is not enough"; i.e. you have to mean it. In the long list of increasing punishments that the Jews could receive if they should reject G-d's statutes (Lev. 26:14-41) even confessing one's sins, and those of one's father, will not be enough, causing G-d to work on behalf of the enemies of the Jews. ...


2

Another name for Dual Fulfillment is Dual Reference: Definition of Dual Reference (J. Dwight Pentecost) "Two events, widely separated as to the time of their fulfillment, may be brought together into the scope of one prophecy. This was done because the prophet had a message for his own day as well as for a future time . . . It was the purpose of ...


1

There are 2 views of this prophecy: 1) Is that it occured in 588BCE, 2 years after Ezekiel made his prophecy(590BCE); which sets the Destruction of Jerusalem at 607BCE, instead of 587BCE. Egypt, being carried off in captivity, and so are those reminants of Jersalem who fled to Egypt in defiance of Jeremiah's prophecy(Jer. 42:15,16,19; 43:10,11) This date ...


1

The answer is not very complicated: the mark of the beast is his "New Covenant." In other words, the false Christ will "write" his law on the minds and hearts of his followers in the same way that Jesus Christ (in the bona-fide New Covenant) had written his law on the minds and hearts of his followers (please see Heb 8:8-12 and Heb 10:16-17, and then ...


1

In regards to the Jebusites, this is probably a reference to how God told David to build an altar on the land of Araunah, a Jebusite. The Israelites had lived in Jerusalem for a while, but it wasn't until David that they conquered the central fortress, which became known as the City of David. That fortress was a Jebusite one. While most of the Jebusites ...


1

It would appear that the crucifixion would have happened on Thursday, rather than Friday. How could the next day be Sabbath? The next day was Passover, a high holy day which was treated as a Sabbath. This would have required two Sabbath day observances back to back and would make sense as to why the women were making their way to the tomb early Sunday ...



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