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The ancient city-state of Tyre was comprised of the erstwhile island proper (no longer extant) in addition to a cluster of sister cities on the mainland (Ezek 26:6). According to the prophecy of Ezekiel, the city-state would become a place for spreading of fishing nets. Ezekiel 26:5 (NASB) She will be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

In this context, the Greek ὠδῖνες refer to the birth pangs a woman experiences while in labor. Basically, the Jews referred to these by the phrase חבלי דמשיח 1 or חבלו של משיח,2 literally "the birth pangs of the Messiah." They are not birth pangs that the Messiah himself experiences (a subjective genitive, if you will), but birth pangs that Israel ...


4

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


4

In Hebrew writing, it is common to express the same idea twice but using two different phrasings or metaphors. For example, in Micah 4:3, the prophet writes: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares,     and their spears into pruning hooks; The same idea is given twice: instruments of war will become instruments of ...


4

While I am almost persuaded by the suggestion that the "day" of Amos 8:9 could be 2 August, 2027 -- which I note will be a Bank holiday in Scotland (significant?)1 -- there is a "real" answer to this question: Thesis : The "day" described in Amos 8:9 is the same "day" as described in Amos 5:18 (so, for the moment, simply setting one single verse along side ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


3

The issue of interpreting the Revelation is very difficult. A book like Proverbs is relatively straight forward; most readers agree on the genre, how it was intended to be read, and how it was intended to be applied. The same can't be said for the Revelation, because interpretations and applications have varied so radically over the centuries, let alone just ...


3

While it is quite common for Christian readers to identify the king of Tyre in Ezekiel 28 (and the king of Babylon in Isaiah 14) with the satan, my opinion is that this is unsustainable from the text alone, and must be assumed by the reader. The function of Ezekiel's prophecies Taken at face value, the book of Ezekiel consists of thirteen prophetic ...


3

One argument that has been made is that the care for the righteous, i.e. the preservation of a man's (David's) bones in suffering, imagery is joined up with the passover theme. In the passover they were not to break any bones of the sacrificial Lamb. 46 “It must be eaten inside the house; take none of the meat outside the house. Do not break any of the ...


3

Dan. 2:40 And the fourth kingdom shall be as strong as iron, inasmuch as iron breaks in pieces and shatters everything; and like iron that crushes, that kingdom will break in pieces and crush all the others. Dan. 2:41 Whereas you saw the feet and toes, partly of potter’s clay and partly of iron, the kingdom shall be divided; yet the strength of the iron ...


3

This turns, I think, on a question of how personal names worked in the time period. There may not be a simple answer to your question. As you've noticed, the name is a short phrase, and the terminal element is theophoric. Semantically, the two versions mean the same thing, and may well have been interchangeable in conversation, or variable in regional ...


2

בֹּרִית -- HALOT, page 159, says "alkaline salt extracted from soap-plant" and goes on to to compare it to בר meaning II -- potash or lye. The particular word occurs twice, here and in Jr 2:22. This is not a bar of dove, but a harsh chemical that could cause injuries.


2

The farmer is one who has disowned his former profession of speaking falsely in the name of the Lord (as the previous verses 4-5 make clear). Such an individual now knows his rightful work and applies himself to it with diligence (verse 5). If he has suffered beatings (e.g. for having spoken falsely in the past), then he sees this as a good and positive ...


2

The Idea in Brief Jesus compared his death to Jonah, who was in the belly of the great fish for three days and three nights (Matt 12:40). Jonah had related his ordeal not only in terms of having been swallowed by the great fish but also as having been "at the roots of the mountains" (Jonah 2:6); that is, Jonah stated that "the earth with its bars was ...


2

Matthew 12:38-40 is often quoted in the context of the timing of Jesus death, burial and resurrection, but seldom is the cryptic nature of Jesus’ reply to the request by his enemies for a sign, alluded to (e.g. the phrase “the heart of the earth” is not a literal phrase). Also, seldom is sufficient attention drawn to precisely who it is that Jesus is ...


2

Another name for Dual Fulfillment is Dual Reference: Definition of Dual Reference (J. Dwight Pentecost) "Two events, widely separated as to the time of their fulfillment, may be brought together into the scope of one prophecy. This was done because the prophet had a message for his own day as well as for a future time . . . It was the purpose of ...


1

This is the verse: "Dan 12:4 But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased." I think the point is being missed. Consider: What are we doing on this site and numerous other sites on the internet? (1) - I am learning from you and you are learning from me, ...


1

First of all, the argument doesn't exist between the KJV and the NKJV, but between the NIV and all the other translations. The NIV IS a translation, and not a 'paraphrase', although biblical scholars(including Daniel Wallace) argue that ANY translation is a paraphrase, as idioms and meanings have to 'make sense' in the vernacular they are written in. Daniel ...


1

The question and the answers suffers from the assumption that the Psalms are prophecy, rather than statements of fact or faith, and also from the inconvenience that in context, Christologic explanations make no sense. The theme of Psalm 34, written by King David, is God's relationship with the righteous and evildoers. According to Rabbi Samson Raphael ...


1

Reading only that part of John 19:31-37 and Psalm 34:20 can make seeing the association difficult. However, reading additional context and another, earlier Psalm of David helps. John 19:31-37, besides having “Not one of his bones will be broken,” has piercing and the flow of blood and water. John 19:33-36 (NIV) But when they came to Jesus and ...


1

There are 2 views of this prophecy: 1) Is that it occured in 588BCE, 2 years after Ezekiel made his prophecy(590BCE); which sets the Destruction of Jerusalem at 607BCE, instead of 587BCE. Egypt, being carried off in captivity, and so are those reminants of Jersalem who fled to Egypt in defiance of Jeremiah's prophecy(Jer. 42:15,16,19; 43:10,11) This date ...


1

In regards to the Jebusites, this is probably a reference to how God told David to build an altar on the land of Araunah, a Jebusite. The Israelites had lived in Jerusalem for a while, but it wasn't until David that they conquered the central fortress, which became known as the City of David. That fortress was a Jebusite one. While most of the Jebusites ...



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