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Not all prophets have recorded prophecy It should be noted that it is possible to a prophet and not have any of your prophetic utterances recorded in scripture, for example in 1 Kings 18:4 we read "For so it was, while Jezebel massacred the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah had taken one hundred prophets and hidden them, fifty to a cave, and had fed them ...


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You are correct that Isaiah wrote for his times and without knowledge of the Christian future. Daniel I Block says in 'My Servant David: Ancient Israel’s Vision of the Messiah', published in Israel’s Messiah (edited by Hess and Carroll), page 22, that in trying to know whether the Israelites of the Old Testament actually understood the Messiah in our terms, ...


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Rabbi David Kimchi (דוד קמחי), also known as Radak (רד"ק), who lived from 1160–1235 A.D., wrote this in his Sefer Mikhlol (Folio 45b - מה, p. 92 on pdf) concerning the usage of the past tense in prophecies (which naturally concern future events): ותדע כי מנהג העוברי׳ בלשון הקדש להשתמש בו עבד מקום עתיד שהן אותיות איתן וזה בנבואות ברוב כי הדבר ברור כמו ...


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The phrase πάντες οἱ προφῆται = pantes hoi prophētai ("all the prophets") is distinctively and only used in the writings by Luke: Luke 11:50; 13:28; 24:27; Acts 3:18; and here in the verse of interest, Acts 10:43. Otherwise, the phrase occurs in the Greek Bible only in the LXX accounts associated with Elijah and Elisha in 1-2 Kings and 2 Chronicles. With ...


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Jason: If you assume that the prophecy in Isaiah 53 actually begins at Isaiah 52:13 -- a line that uses the future tense -- then the text will read much differently than taught in church. We need to start at chapter 52 because the person described in chapter 53 is just described as "he." Who is "he"? Verse 52:13 begins the narration saying, "Behold, My ...


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Isaiah did not write in the past tense. Biblical Hebrew does not employ tenses in the same way as English or Greek do. Isaiah wrote this chapter in perfect aspect ie he saw the actions of the verbs as whole/ complete without respect to their timing1 Prophecy is often presented in the perfect aspect as it is direct revelation from God the actions are not ...


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Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...


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It is highly unlikely Hosea is using a literary device. First, there were two real golden calves in Israel the people worshipped. When the nation divided, Jeroboam, the first king of Israel made two golden calves: Therefore the king asked advice, made two calves of gold, and said to the people, “It is too much for you to go up to Jerusalem. Here are ...


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The New American Bible, in note 4 to 2 Kings chapter 3, does initially attribute this triumph to the god Chemosh. However, the New American Bible then suggests an alternative, monotheistic explanation, which inevitably recognises the polytheistic beliefs of the early Israelites and their belief in the efficacy of child sacrifice: The wrath against ...


3

Establishing What is Being Stated The first thing to be established is the meaning of Act 10:43. Note that additional verse references, unless otherwise noted, are also from Acts chapter 10. The text I believe to do this, one must at least consider as well v.42. The Greek text with my interlinear translation (largely following the NKJV) is: 42 Καὶ ...


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The Staff called "chabal" The word "chabal" (חָבַל) is actually the name given to the staff, see Zechariah 11:7 "So I fed the flock for slaughter, in particular the poor of the flock. I took for myself two staffs: the one I called Beauty, and the other I called Bonds; and I fed the flock."[NKJV] as this is the name of the staff the punctuation of the ESV ...


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There is indubitably a verbal resemblance between the Greek (LXX) version of Joel 3:2: καὶ συνάξω πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and I shall gather together all the nations” and Mt 25:32: καὶ συναχθήσονται ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and before him will be gathered together all the nations”. συνάξω and συναχθήσονται are two forms (future active and future passive ...


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The context of the passage points to the second beast. Chapter 13 begins with the beast who comes up out of the sea (ἐκ τῆς θαλάσσης θηρίον ἀναβαῖνον). However, the subject changes to 'another beast' in v. 11, who was 'coming up from the earth' (ἄλλο θηρίον ἀναβαῖνον ἐκ τῆς γῆς). It is within the context of this second beast where discussion of its number ...


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A close examination of scripture reveals Rachael's death and burial location as falling short of reaching Ephrath. Jacob made mention of this: Gen 48:7 As for me, when I came from Paddan, Rachel died beside me in the land of Canaan on the way, when there was still some distance to come to Ephrath, and I buried her there on the way to Ephrath (also ...


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The Idea in Brief The passage is to be understood in its plain and normal sense. That is, the handmaiden of Rachel was Bilhah, who had borne sons to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. She was thus the surrogate mother of children to Jacob on behalf of Rachel. (Rachel later had her own biological children, Joseph and Benjamin.) When Rachel died at the birth of ...


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The Idea in Brief The passage of Zech 12:10 is messianic in both the Christian and Jewish understanding of this verse. That is, the New Testament perspective correlates Zech 12:10 with Jesus of Nazareth, who embodied the eternal life of his Father in heaven, but was crucified and died on the cross. According to the New Testament, Jesus possessed the same ...


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Four Post-Exilic Texts There are four texts in the Hebrew scriptures that were written in close historical proximity: Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, and Zechariah 1-8. In their respective books, Ezra and Nehemiah are portrayed as significant leaders during the post-exilic period, especially regarding the efforts to build a new temple in Jerusalem. Likewise, Ezra ...


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Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...


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Taken from here: Finally, the distinction between דָּם‎ blood and דָּמִים‎ requires to be specially noticed. The singular is always used when the blood is regarded as an organic unity, hence also of menstrual blood, and the blood of sacrifices (collected in the basin and then sprinkled), and in Nu 2324 of the blood gushing from wounds. On the ...


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I would add that the Greek thinking is prophecy is seen as statement and fulfillment while the Hebrew emphasizes prophecy in pattern. So Jacob (the younger) steals Esau's blessing; then he is tricked into getting Leah (the elder); finally he purposely gives Ephraim (the younger) Manasseh's blessing. The pattern of the younger being preferred over the elder ...


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Strong's defines prophet: A prophet (4396 προφήτης/prophḗtēs) declares the mind (message) of God, which sometimes predicts the future (foretelling) – and more commonly, speaks forth His message for a particular situation. Note: prophecy doesn't only mean predicting the future. In general, a prophet is a messenger of God. None of Abels' words were ...


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You should note that when this verse says that those Scriptures are fulfilled, this does not necessarily mean that a prophecy was made and now carried out. Fulfillment is not always about prophecy. Sometimes fulfillment is about character being brought out again in its fullness. The same God who, in all of His goodness, cared for David as expressed in ...



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