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6

You are correct that Isaiah wrote for his times and without knowledge of the Christian future. Daniel I Block says in 'My Servant David: Ancient Israel’s Vision of the Messiah', published in Israel’s Messiah (edited by Hess and Carroll), page 22, that in trying to know whether the Israelites of the Old Testament actually understood the Messiah in our terms, ...


5

Rabbi David Kimchi (דוד קמחי), also known as Radak (רד"ק), who lived from 1160–1235 A.D., wrote this in his Sefer Mikhlol (Folio 45b - מה, p. 92 on pdf) concerning the usage of the past tense in prophecies (which naturally concern future events): ותדע כי מנהג העוברי׳ בלשון הקדש להשתמש בו עבד מקום עתיד שהן אותיות איתן וזה בנבואות ברוב כי הדבר ברור כמו ...


5

Not all prophets have recorded prophecy It should be noted that it is possible to a prophet and not have any of your prophetic utterances recorded in scripture, for example in 1 Kings 18:4 we read "For so it was, while Jezebel massacred the prophets of the LORD, that Obadiah had taken one hundred prophets and hidden them, fifty to a cave, and had fed them ...


4

Peter changes more than just the first phrase when he quotes Joel. Acts 2:17 And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams: (KJV) Joel 2:28 And it shall come to pass ...


4

The Greek text of Acts 2:17 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα καὶ προφητεύσουσιν οἱ υἱοὶ ὑμῶν καὶ αἱ θυγατέρες ὑμῶν καὶ οἱ νεανίσκοι ὑμῶν ὁράσεις ὄψονται καὶ οἱ πρεσβύτεροι ὑμῶν ἐνυπνία ἐνυπνιασθήσονται The Greek phrase ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ...


3

Isaiah did not write in the past tense. Biblical Hebrew does not employ tenses in the same way as English or Greek do. Isaiah wrote this chapter in perfect aspect ie he saw the actions of the verbs as whole/ complete without respect to their timing1 Prophecy is often presented in the perfect aspect as it is direct revelation from God the actions are not ...


2

Short Answer: It depends on which hermeneutic you follow. To my knowledge there are three major hermeneutical approaches to this question: Approach #1: The literal hermeneutic In this approach, the text means precisely what it says; Bethel refers to Bethel, Judah to Judah, Ephraim to Ephraim. If we read a prophecy anticipating the downfall of Gilgal it ...


2

First of all, the argument doesn't exist between the KJV and the NKJV, but between the NIV and all the other translations. The NIV IS a translation, and not a 'paraphrase', although biblical scholars(including Daniel Wallace) argue that ANY translation is a paraphrase, as idioms and meanings have to 'make sense' in the vernacular they are written in. Daniel ...


2

If the Palestinian fisherman was actually quoting Joel 2:28, he could be expected to be quoting the Hebrew text, which come down to us (with unknown amendments, if any) in the Masoretic text. Perhaps Peter knew Greek, and we know that Acts 2:8 says he could now speak in every language, but we would still expect him not to quote the Septuagint (LXX), both ...


2

The Staff called "chabal" The word "chabal" (חָבַל) is actually the name given to the staff, see Zechariah 11:7 "So I fed the flock for slaughter, in particular the poor of the flock. I took for myself two staffs: the one I called Beauty, and the other I called Bonds; and I fed the flock."[NKJV] as this is the name of the staff the punctuation of the ESV ...


2

There is indubitably a verbal resemblance between the Greek (LXX) version of Joel 3:2: καὶ συνάξω πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and I shall gather together all the nations” and Mt 25:32: καὶ συναχθήσονται ἔμπροσθεν αὐτοῦ πάντα τὰ ἔθνη “and before him will be gathered together all the nations”. συνάξω and συναχθήσονται are two forms (future active and future passive ...


2

Jason: If you assume that the prophecy in Isaiah 53 actually begins at Isaiah 52:13 -- a line that uses the future tense -- then the text will read much differently than taught in church. We need to start at chapter 52 because the person described in chapter 53 is just described as "he." Who is "he"? Verse 52:13 begins the narration saying, "Behold, My ...


1

The Idea in Brief The passage of Zech 12:10 is messianic in both the Christian and Jewish understanding of this verse. That is, the New Testament perspective correlates Zech 12:10 with Jesus of Nazareth, who embodied the eternal life of his Father in heaven, but was crucified and died on the cross. According to the New Testament, Jesus possessed the same ...


1

Four Post-Exilic Texts There are four texts in the Hebrew scriptures that were written in close historical proximity: Ezra, Nehemiah, Haggai, and Zechariah 1-8. In their respective books, Ezra and Nehemiah are portrayed as significant leaders during the post-exilic period, especially regarding the efforts to build a new temple in Jerusalem. Likewise, Ezra ...


1

Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...


1

Strong's defines prophet: A prophet (4396 προφήτης/prophḗtēs) declares the mind (message) of God, which sometimes predicts the future (foretelling) – and more commonly, speaks forth His message for a particular situation. Note: prophecy doesn't only mean predicting the future. In general, a prophet is a messenger of God. None of Abels' words were ...


1

Taken from here: Finally, the distinction between דָּם‎ blood and דָּמִים‎ requires to be specially noticed. The singular is always used when the blood is regarded as an organic unity, hence also of menstrual blood, and the blood of sacrifices (collected in the basin and then sprinkled), and in Nu 2324 of the blood gushing from wounds. On the ...


1

I would add that the Greek thinking is prophecy is seen as statement and fulfillment while the Hebrew emphasizes prophecy in pattern. So Jacob (the younger) steals Esau's blessing; then he is tricked into getting Leah (the elder); finally he purposely gives Ephraim (the younger) Manasseh's blessing. The pattern of the younger being preferred over the elder ...


1

As noted above, Rachel was deceased so it is a little hard to understand what Abraham was getting at. In the early church the OT stories were seen as types of Christ and the church. The similarities between Joseph's vision and the one in the Apocalypse are often noted. Rev 12:1 And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, ...


1

Rashi on Genesis 37:10 states the following: Will we come: Isn’t your mother (Rachel) already dead? But he (Jacob) did not know that the matters referred to Bilhah, who had raised him (Joseph) as [if she were] his mother (Gen. Rabbah 84:11). Our Rabbis, however, derived from here that there is no dream without meaningless components (Ber. 55a/b). Jacob, ...


1

As a literary construction, there are three short stories which justify resentment on the part of the brothers, followed by the decision of the brothers to get rid of Joseph. First, in Genesis 37:3-4, Jacob gives Joseph a coat of many colours, demonstrating to the brothers that he loved Joseph more than he loved them. In the first of two dreams reported ...


1

The text in Acts 2:17 is a quotation of the Septuagint version of Joel 2:28. (The Hebrew version of the latter is irrelevant for this question). If you look at the two side by side you cannot escape the conclusion that the author of Acts has intentionally altered the text. Compare: Acts 2:17 Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ ...


1

The context of the passage points to the second beast. Chapter 13 begins with the beast who comes up out of the sea (ἐκ τῆς θαλάσσης θηρίον ἀναβαῖνον). However, the subject changes to 'another beast' in v. 11, who was 'coming up from the earth' (ἄλλο θηρίον ἀναβαῖνον ἐκ τῆς γῆς). It is within the context of this second beast where discussion of its number ...


1

Thank you Jack and Tau. I will now attempt to qualify my position and will start by acknowledging the definition of the word chronology as a listing of events that occur in order with respect to time. An event may be recorded first followed by the time-period or vice versa. Both methods of recording the chronology is employed in the text. I do not think any ...


1

I propose that before considering location and its meaning, we must consider time. In this respect, Amos is considered to have been written before the fall of Samaria in 722 BCE. When Amos is talking about locations in Israel, he really is talking about the northern kingdom in contemporary or near-contemporary terms. Amos was a prophet of Yahweh and possibly ...


1

To answer this question, one must address an underlying presupposition: that somehow the 5 Kingdoms merely represent political entities that were destroyed(or replaced) with future ones. Hence, the conclusion is "it all leads up to Christ", and an arbitrary conclusion that it ends with the Destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, from which time we have entered ...


1

Chapter 54 is considered by many scholars to be part of the work (Isaiah chapters 44-55) of an anonymous scribe, now known as Second Isaiah, or Deutero-Isaiah, writing during the Babylonian Exile. Second Isaiah (and, later, Third Isaiah) probably wrote a separate book, which was only added some time later to the Book of Isaiah, which was of course written ...


1

The prophets frequently compare the relationship of God and Israel as one similar to husband and wife. Song of Songs' erotic imagry embraces the mutual love of the two. Hosea, taking lessons from his own life story, sees Israel as the wayward wife who God is willing to accept back should she repent her sins. Isaiah uses similar imagry asking at 50:1 ...


1

The full verse is: "Not one of them was lost except the one destined for destruction, so that the scripture could be fulfilled." (NET) The event in which the scripture became fulfilled was the loss of the one destined for destruction rather than the preservation of all the others. The NET Bible provides this very helpful footnote to this verse: A ...


1

This is the verse: "Dan 12:4 But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased." I think the point is being missed. Consider: What are we doing on this site and numerous other sites on the internet? (1) - I am learning from you and you are learning from me, ...



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