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You are correct that Isaiah wrote for his times and without knowledge of the Christian future. Daniel I Block says in 'My Servant David: Ancient Israel’s Vision of the Messiah', published in Israel’s Messiah (edited by Hess and Carroll), page 22, that in trying to know whether the Israelites of the Old Testament actually understood the Messiah in our terms, ...


4

Rabbi David Kimchi (דוד קמחי), also known as Radak (רד"ק), who lived from 1160–1235 A.D., wrote this in his Sefer Mikhlol (Folio 45b - מה, p. 92 on pdf) concerning the usage of the past tense in prophecies (which naturally concern future events): ותדע כי מנהג העוברי׳ בלשון הקדש להשתמש בו עבד מקום עתיד שהן אותיות איתן וזה בנבואות ברוב כי הדבר ברור כמו ...


2

Jason: If you assume that the prophecy in Isaiah 53 actually begins at Isaiah 52:13 -- a line that uses the future tense -- then the text will read much differently than taught in church. We need to start at chapter 52 because the person described in chapter 53 is just described as "he." Who is "he"? Verse 52:13 begins the narration saying, "Behold, My ...


2

Isaiah did not write in the past tense. Biblical Hebrew does not employ tenses in the same way as English or Greek do. Isaiah wrote this chapter in perfect aspect ie he saw the actions of the verbs as whole/ complete without respect to their timing1 Prophecy is often presented in the perfect aspect as it is direct revelation from God the actions are not ...


1

Wikipedia defines eisegesis as the process of interpreting a text or portion of text in such a way that the process introduces one's own presuppositions, agendas, or biases into and onto the text. This is commonly referred to as reading into the text. Randall Price puts it a little differently in The Secrets of the Dead Sea Scrolls, page 83, where he ...



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