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22

This is actually part of a theme that runs through prophetic literature: the idea that the people of Israel are doing the ritual right but getting all the important stuff wrong. It is consonant with, for example, in the book of Hosea: For I desire steadfast love and not sacrifice, the knowledge of God rather than burnt-offerings. (Hosea 6.6) Or in ...


14

A little bit of Friday, Saturday and a little bit of Sunday could be properly describe as three days and nights in Biblical language. We think of days as 24 hour periods but they included in their common expressions a 'day' as 'any part of a day, or 'touching any part of a calendar day'. The term 'three days and three nights' was a Jewish expression that ...


12

I think lonesomeday has a good answer, but I would like to add another dimension: The festivals and sacrifices being observed in Israel at the time of Amos were also displeasing because they were bound up with idol worship and violated many of the statutes God has given regarding them. The vision Amos receives is written to the people in the day of Jeroboam ...


8

One of my favorite sayings in hermeneutics is: The meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. As you indicated in your question, there are many "women" mentioned in the Bible, so to determine which "woman" is being referenced here, we need to look at the context. As we proceed, keep in mind that this is "a great sign in ...


7

Could it have been Jesus? I doubt it could be Jesus, because the implication of verses 12-13 is that the speaker was restrained by the "prince of the Persian kingdom"; I doubt the prince could have restrained Jesus. So is it an angel or a human? Verses 5-6 show that the person is an angel: I looked up and there before me was a man dressed in linen, ...


6

Prophecy for Israel can come from the mouths of anyone, even gentiles (Bila'am). The prophecy in Hosea refers to divine retribution in the form of destruction of the two temples (two days), and a future raising of the third temple and restoration of Israel's worship through it (third day). On the "days" passage (v2), Rashi says: He will revive us from ...


6

There were many things that Matthew did not understand about the ministry of Christ until after Jesus death, burial, resurrection, and ascension. The references that the prophets made about the Messiah were likely high on that list. The beauty of most of the references about the messiah is that they were already understood in the historical context which ...


6

I am not an expert on Christian scriptures and history, but discussion on other answers on this question led me to enough information to propose an answer. One approach is to count partial days, so "three days and three nights" is understood as "three days, including the nights". If we understand Jesus' death to have been on Friday (the dominant opinion to ...


6

In this context, the Greek ὠδῖνες refer to the birth pangs a woman experiences while in labor. Basically, the Jews referred to these by the phrase חבלי דמשיח 1 or חבלו של משיח,2 literally "the birth pangs of the Messiah." They are not birth pangs that the Messiah himself experiences (a subjective genitive, if you will), but birth pangs that Israel ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

The ancient city-state of Tyre was comprised of the erstwhile island proper (no longer extant) in addition to a cluster of sister cities on the mainland (Ezek 26:6). According to the prophecy of Ezekiel, the city-state would become a place for spreading of fishing nets. Ezekiel 26:5 (NASB) She will be a place for the spreading of nets in the midst of ...


5

The Hebrew word for week is literally a time period of seven (Strong's #7620). In Deuteronomy 16:9 it is certainly used to refer to a time period of seven days. In Genesis 29:18-30 it is clearly used to refer to a time period of seven years! Thus, Upon seeing this word one must ask, "a time period of seven whats?" We are dependent upon textual and ...


5

Isaiah 52:13-53:12 constitutes what is considered the fourth Servant song. The others are Isaiah 42:1-9, Isaiah 49:1-13, and Isaiah 50:4-9. Also, some consider Isaiah 61:1-3 a fifth Servant song, though the word "servant" is not used there. All of these songs speak of a Servant called by God to lead the nations. There is no clear referant within Isaiah ...


5

If this is not a quotation of an unrepentant group, the Christology is abundantly clear (all the points below apply to this case). Even if it is a quotation from an unrepentant group: There is Scriptural precedent for prophecy by unregenerate individuals... both those who are aware that that they are prophesying (Saul) and those who are not (Caiaphas) ...


5

There is nothing in the text in 2 Samuel 7 or in subsequent writings within the Tanakh that hints that the Davidic covenant spoken through Nathan was spoken falsely by him or embellished. 1 Kings 4:31 esteems the wisdom of Ethan the Ezrahite pretty highly; his wisdom is the bar by which the author compares Solomon's own wisdom. I mention this because Ethan ...


4

Nahum takes place about 140 years after Jonah. Jonah preached, they repented, they later returned to wickedness, and Nahum prophesied judgement. Ironically, Nahum means "comfort." Jonah shows a 7-8th century BC background (though some argue the current form came much later, around the 4th century BC). And 2 Kings 14:25 mentions a prophet named Jonah son ...


4

This should not be taken as a prophecy but as a lesson on true faith. If you read before this passage, you see that Jesus has been having issues with the religious leaders. Over and over they fail to believe, or more specifically, fail to recognize who he is. Now, go back to the Hebrew scriptures. Jonah was pretty cool, but you would really only expect ...


4

The usage of Hosea 11:1 in Matthew 2:15 is consistent with the "drash" reading of scripture that was accepted among the dominant Pharisaic Jewish tradition at the time of Jesus. See this explanation of "drash" and its relationship to context in the Wikipedia article on "pshat" [emphasis is mine]: Definitions of Peshat also note the importance of ...


4

While I am almost persuaded by the suggestion that the "day" of Amos 8:9 could be 2 August, 2027 -- which I note will be a Bank holiday in Scotland (significant?)1 -- there is a "real" answer to this question: Thesis : The "day" described in Amos 8:9 is the same "day" as described in Amos 5:18 (so, for the moment, simply setting one single verse along side ...


4

Regarding the phrase, "And YHVH said to the children of Yisra'el," Rabbi David Kimchi wrote, על ידי נביא, that is, "by the hands of a prophet" (cp. Jdg. 6:8). One should recall that the Israelites pleaded with God that He no more speak to them personally (Exo. 20:19 cp. Deut. 18:15-19). So, in particular contexts where it seems as though God is speaking to ...


4

In Hebrew writing, it is common to express the same idea twice but using two different phrasings or metaphors. For example, in Micah 4:3, the prophet writes: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares,     and their spears into pruning hooks; The same idea is given twice: instruments of war will become instruments of ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


3

The citation in Ezekiel 4:6 is exactly identical with a similar case of judgment in Numbers 14:34, where the Israelites were confined to the wilderness for 40 years so that each year corresponded with each day that the spies were in the land. In both Ezekiel 4:6 and Numbers 14:34, the expansion of "days into years" stemmed from the iniquity of the Israelites ...


3

I use this verse and its context to teach a bad use of verses and context. If this verse is used for Jesus being slain on the cross then we would have to make an almost impossible connection between the false prophets and Jesus, something that seems to tie a knot in our hermeneutical stomach. It is so important to observe that the verse has a connection ...


3

It is almost too easy of a question. As Amos "sees" the word of the Lord, there is a chronology throughout the vision. The condemnations pronounced are not only directed toward Israel, but also to her enemies. In all the judgment statements throughout the prophets, we find this statement, "In that day..." over 100 times. The chronology is simple. 1. God ...


3

Contextually, the Mark of the Beast refers to the beast which has the fatal wound on one of its heads. This would seem to be the beast arising from the sea. Verses 12, 14b, 15 seem to support this in that the second beast will make the earth worship the first beast (v12), commanded the people to make a statue to honor the first beast (vv14b, 15). It would ...


3

This turns, I think, on a question of how personal names worked in the time period. There may not be a simple answer to your question. As you've noticed, the name is a short phrase, and the terminal element is theophoric. Semantically, the two versions mean the same thing, and may well have been interchangeable in conversation, or variable in regional ...


3

Dan. 2:40 And the fourth kingdom shall be as strong as iron, inasmuch as iron breaks in pieces and shatters everything; and like iron that crushes, that kingdom will break in pieces and crush all the others. Dan. 2:41 Whereas you saw the feet and toes, partly of potter’s clay and partly of iron, the kingdom shall be divided; yet the strength of the iron ...


3

While it is quite common for Christian readers to identify the king of Tyre in Ezekiel 28 (and the king of Babylon in Isaiah 14) with the satan, my opinion is that this is unsustainable from the text alone, and must be assumed by the reader. The function of Ezekiel's prophecies Taken at face value, the book of Ezekiel consists of thirteen prophetic ...


3

One argument that has been made is that the care for the righteous, i.e. the preservation of a man's (David's) bones in suffering, imagery is joined up with the passover theme. In the passover they were not to break any bones of the sacrificial Lamb. 46 “It must be eaten inside the house; take none of the meat outside the house. Do not break any of the ...



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