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15

This is potentially an awkward theological passage, as the verse you have quoted appears to promote the idea that human beings can accomplish their own salvation by their actions. This is a belief called Pelagianism, which has been considered heresy since the earliest days of the Church. If we look at the Greek, the translation you have quoted is pretty ...


12

The Greek text of Philippians 4:3 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, καὶ ἐρωτῶ καὶ σέ σύζυγε γνήσιε συλλαμβάνου αὐταῖς αἵτινες ἐν τῷ εὐαγγελίῳ συνήθλησάν μοι μετὰ καὶ Κλήμεντος καὶ τῶν λοιπῶν συνεργῶν μου ὧν τὰ ὀνόματα ἐν βίβλῳ ζωῆς The Greek word σύζυγε is declined in the feminine/masculine gender, vocative case, and singular ...


9

Katatomē in Philippians 3:2 means "mutilation". It isn't used elsewhere in the New Testament, nor is the cognate verb κατατέμνω. However, the latter is used four times in the LXX. A glance over the three that correspond closely to the Hebrew (and thus to the English I'm able to pull up at Biblegateway) will give you an idea about the background associations ...


7

It is correct to say that σύζυγος (literally “yoke-mate, one of a pair”) can be masculine or feminine, and that it is very often used to mean “wife” in classical and post-classical Greek. But in this passage it is modified by the adjective γνήσιε, which is unmistakeably masculine singular vocative. Thus, “wife” is not possible here. Anyway, as you point ...


7

No, these verses don't promote deception for the sake of mission. (1) 1 Corinthians 9:20-21 is set in the context of Paul defending his austere life-style as a counter-indicator of his apostleship. As one of many signs of his self-abnegation, he claims to subordinate even his own identity to those to whom he speaks. The contrast does not stop with ...


7

Using a Greek Lexicon, I was able to find that this same word is used in the Septuagint (LXX). This passage makes it seem that it is not offensive (Ecclesiasticus – Sirach): 27:4 As when one sifteth with a sieve, the refuse remaineth; so the filth of man in his talk. 27:4 ἐν σεισματι κοσκινου διαμενει κοπρια οὑτως σκυβαλα ἀνθρωπου ἐν λογισμω αὐτου ...


6

I don't think there is much to debate about what was graciously given or bestowed (ἐχαρίσθη not ἐδόθη). The οὐ μόνον ("not only") in antithesis to ἀλλὰ καὶ ("but also") seems to clearly indicate not only one thing but also another was given to the Christians. That is, it was graciously given to them by God (cp. 1 Cor. 2:12) not only (1) to believe in Christ, ...


5

Paul's text about "working out your salvation with fear and trembling" in Philippians 2:13 is actually more likely about reverent, obedient awe rather than being terrified of judgment. I conclude this for three reasons: Paul uses phobos kai tromos (fear and trembling) elsewhere to mean "reverent obedience": Look at 2 Corinthians 7:15 where Paul describes ...


5

OP: Why is "Out" Injected? Many modern doctrines/translations inject "Out" into this passage, "Work Out", which implies "figuring out", implying a process of reasoning, ".. Figure out your own salvation ...” The word “out” is “injected” because: κατεργάζομαι does not simply mean “work”. The word “work” in English is usually intransitive.1 I ...


5

The word μορφῇ means "form, outward appearance, [or] shape"1 (occurring in the dative in this context following the preposition ἐν). To be very blunt, translating this as "nature" (as the NIV does) is a poor translation choice. Discussion of God's nature is theologically charged and thus using "nature" in this context could be misleading. The NET translators ...


5

Jesus was both "in the form of God" (ἐν μορφῇ θεοῦ) and "took the form of a servant" (μορφὴν δούλου λαβών). Jesus "took the form of a servant" (Phil. 2:7) and he was a servant (Isa. 42:1). Jesus was "in the form of God" (Phil. 2:6) and he was __. form of a servant: servant :: form of God: ___ form of X: X :: form of Y: Y


5

There are, at least, two different perspectives that can be derived from the phrase "work out your own salvation"... Do something to gain a salvation that you do not already have Live out the salvation that you already do have Reading Phil 2:12 in context of its preceding verses has me to believe that perspective 2 is closer to what Paul is saying ...


5

Greek text: 5 Τοῦτο φρονεῖτε ἐν ὑμῖν ὃ καὶ ἐν Χριστῷ Ἰησοῦ, 6 ὃς ἐν μορφῇ θεοῦ ὑπάρχων οὐχ ἁρπαγμὸν ἡγήσατο τὸ εἶναι ἴσα θεῷ, 7 ἀλλ’ ἑαυτὸν ἐκένωσεν μορφὴν δούλου λαβών, ἐν ὁμοιώματι ἀνθρώπων γενόμενος· καὶ σχήματι εὑρεθεὶς ὡς ἄνθρωπος 8 ἐταπείνωσεν ἑαυτὸν γενόμενος ὑπήκοος μέχρι θανάτου, θανάτου δὲ σταυροῦ. NA28 English Translation: 5 Have this ...


4

Strictly Grammatical Look is Not Enough H3br3wHamm3r81's answer correctly points out the "οὐ μόνον ... ἀλλὰ καὶ" ("not only ... but also") wording in the verse, and correctly concludes "both" are granted. But that does not entirely answer the question of its meaning, because one must ask in what sense the verse is saying such is granted. There are at ...


3

Linguistically, Paul refers back to the direct object of the previous sentence - "your manner of life". [You] (subject) let (verb) your manner of life be worthy of the Gospel of Christ (object clause) Breaking down the object clause, your manner [of life] (subject) be worthy (verb) The remainder of the first sentence further refines Paul's ...


3

The passage in question is Philippians 2:5-11 (NET Bible): You should have the same attitude toward one another that Christ Jesus had, who though he existed in the form of God did not regard equality with God as something to be grasped, but emptied himself by taking on the form of a slave, by looking like other men, and by sharing in human nature. He ...


3

I do not think that obscenities/profanities can be pigeon-holed. There is no point in figuring out if σκύβαλον is an obscenity. From one era the N word is acceptable and the next it is offensive. From one period calling someone a dyke is offensive but in recent years it is celebrated by those who accept a certain life-style. Is it considered offensive to ...


3

The name Syzygus is not found in all of Greek literature, so this is unlikely. Chrysostom does not know, but guesses that it could be one of the women's husbands. Gordon Fee thinks it likely that it is Luke. The calling of this person "a genuine companion" brings to mind a close long standing relationship. In the Book of Acts, written by Luke, he ...


2

It is formally accusative plural neuter, but here used as an adverb. See: http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3Di%29%2Fsos (Especially under IV). The KJV is, as usual, about as literal as it is possible to get in English: “Who, being in the form of God, thought it not robbery to be equal with God”. Already ...


2

The word "apostle" is a partial transliteration of the Greek ἀπόστολον or "apostolon." Due to our regular use of "apostle" in English, we have attached meaning to that word as if it were distinct from a word like messenger. However, "apostolon" means a messenger or one sent on a mission. In Greek, "apostolon" is used to refer to messengers as well as Jesus' ...


2

The differences may also be seen from the Greek words used: For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves; it is the gift of God,  not of works (ἔργον ergon), lest anyone should boast , (Ephesians 2:8-9 NKJV) ἔργον ergon - From ἔργω ergō (a primary but obsolete word; to work); toil (as an effort or occupation); by ...


2

The same two words: φόβος (fear) and τρόμος (trembling) are used (in different cases, as dictated by the context) in Phil. 2:12 and in the Greek version (Septuagint) of Ps. 2:11 and Ps. 55:5. So yes, it is likely that the author of Philippians is alluding to these two Psalms. Phil. 2:12: μετα φόβου καὶ τρόμου Ps. 2:11: ἐν φόβῳ καὶ (…) ἐν τρόμῳ Ps. 55:5: ...


1

I can't translate the greek, but I can tell you that the answer comes from the wider context: 19 I hope in the Lord Jesus to send Timothy to you soon, so that I too may be cheered by news of you. 20 For I have no one like him, who will be genuinely concerned for your welfare. 21 For they all seek their own interests, not those of Jesus Christ. 22 But you ...


1

I think a problem comes in assuming that the "name above every name" is "Jesus". Jesus/Yeshua was a common name at the time (http://www.jesus.org/is-jesus-god/names-of-jesus/jesus-an-ordinary-name.html). Joshua appears to been as common a Jewish name as John is in English. Even today the name Jesus is common in some parts of the world. However, the ...


1

Even the ESV didn't mess up this one, as διὸ does mean "therefore/wherefore/for this reason..." It is saying that whatever follows is at least partially because of whatever precedes. I don't see a conflict between these two words in this passage. Philippians 2:9 does not say that Christ earned a prize (implying that God was forced to give Christ this ...


1

The clause 'he emptied himself' points to the exinanition of Christ. Christ made his self empty, zero, nil. This didn't mean that his individuality/personhood was removed or was gone. He remained the divine person he was the time he became flesh (John 1:1: 1:14).Christ did not cease to have all the fullness of the Godhead. He did not empty any of his divine ...


1

As Radz mentioned, there seems to be instances in the NT of both meanings ("appearance" and "nature"). I would say that "nature" fits in the case of Phil 2:6-7 because of the context - namely the contrast between "he existed" (ὑπάρχω (5225)) and "he took" (λαμβάνω (2983)). The first form (being God) is the original, the second form (a servant) was an ...


1

The adverb 'out' is required by the context of the text in question. Philippians 2:12 itself does not speak of working for our salvation which have the sense of saving ourselves from what Christ had saved us from. Rather, it speaks of showing or expressing our salvation by obedience. 12 Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed, so now, not only ...


1

Perhaps a slight (grammatically sound) rearranging of the phrase might help clarify: let the outworking of your salvation be with fear and trembling, A few clues from the context tell us this phrasing (and hence meaning) are correct: "Therefore, my beloved, as you have always obeyed.." Paul was directing this letter to those who had "always ...



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