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Even conservative theologians acknowledge that Luke was not with Paul on the road to Damascus so, if Luke was the author of Acts, he must have received all three versions from Paul, or at least one version that he subsequently amended for his own reasons and placed in three different contexts. Rex Wyler says,in The Jesus Sayings, page 43, that historians ...


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The term Paul used that is translated 'homosexual(s)' came directly from the two Greek words in the Greek translation of the Levitical passage (i.e. the Septuagint, which Paul quoted regularly) condemning homosexuality. Paul "coined" the compound word, but it did not come from a vacuum. The Septuagint's translation of the Levitical passage says, in effect, ...


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Here is something for you. Do you imagine an ancient world where the people knew nothing of agrarian life but only spoke in terms of Greek theater? Picture a team of Oxen pulling a wagon, and the driver using a long sharp stick to motivate the oxen, poking them in the buttOx - pun intended. And what do you think would happen to Oxen who kicked against the ...


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In Acts 26:15, it is said that Paul hears the voice of Jesus say: “Saul, Saul, why persecute me? it is hard for thee to kick against the goads[pros kentra laktizein]," with the KJV using the English synonym 'pricks'. Uta Ranke-Heinemann, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 163-9, claims there is a parallel in the Bacchae, which is approximately five ...


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This passage may not be original. Paul was a proud Jew, yet we see in 1 Thessalonians 2:14-16 that he castigates the Jews, speaking of them in the third pary, in spite of being a Jew himself: For you, brothers, have become imitators of the churches of God that are in Judea in Christ Jesus. For you suffer the same things from your compatriots as they ...


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"My question posed here, [which] is about the historical context of Luke and Paul's relationship, and how that relationship might or might not have affected the textual relationships of the writings attributed to them." Undoubtedly, Paul and Luke had a working relationship - Paul himself says so - and therefore the assumption in note 1 should go ...


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Good question! Commentators seem divided over whether Paul's vow in Acts 18:18 is 1) The beginning of a nazarite vow, 2) the completion of a nazarite vow, or 3) a different kind of vow altogether. 1) It is the beginning of a nazarite vow. Though nothing is said about the necessity of hair-cutting at the beginning of a vow, it is not unreasonable to think ...



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