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Paul speaks of tongues throughout chapter 14, reviewing the entire chapter will prove useful. I've split my response into the answer in summary first and my work following it. Also, I've split my work into sections (1,2,3) and (A,B,C) which you can refer to when reading the answer. The Answer Tongues are mentioned along side prophecy many times and mention ...


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In Rom 1:8-10, Paul's blessing refers to the strong faith of the Romans; in 1 Cor 1:4-6 likewise, as Paul thanks God for their faith; 2 Cor 1:2-7 differs only in that the blessing is in the form of words of comfort; 1 Thess 2-4 is again gives thanks for their faith. Compare this to Galatians, where Paul wishes the Galatians well (Gal 1:2) but omits the ...


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First of all I would suggest there is not an "eyewitness-like nature" of Acts and that perception arises more out of a wish that it be so. There are some parallels, but no more so than one would expect from a writer who had access to at least some of Paul's epistles and perhaps knowledge of what the Christian community of his time believed about Paul. The ...


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May I suggest a slightly different approach? Rather than viewing the passage primarily as an historical record and thus exploring the jailor's original meaning behind his original words, I would suggest viewing this first and foremost as part of the story that Luke is telling and thus exploring Luke's usage of the word "saved" in the book of Acts. This ...


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Just back up a verse: 21 In the Law it is written, "BY MEN OF STRANGE TONGUES AND BY THE LIPS OF STRANGERS I WILL SPEAK TO THIS PEOPLE, AND EVEN SO THEY WILL NOT LISTEN TO ME," says the Lord. That's a quote from Isaiah 28 (which is addressed to drunken, immature judges, priests and prophets): 11 For with mocking lips and a foreign tongue he will ...


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There is no need to assume that a Roman prison guard would not have known both the circumstances of the city riot, as well as the conditions for which the new prisoners were in stocks. You said, My understanding is that the jailer was likely a pagan Roman with little exposure to the Christian notion of salvation. There is no reason to assume this. ...


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I don't think a "concrete," "certain," answer can be given ... However, perhaps there is a plausible explanation given the period, and given cultures at work: Titus, Timothy, Galatians, had notable issues regarding Gentile Christians and the controversy of Pharasaic/Rabbinic doctrines and traditions being taught in the Churches. In view of this, it ...



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