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Setting to the scene The parable of the Good Samaritan is told by Jesus shortly after an expert of the law summarizes the law into 1) Love God and 2) Love your neighbor. This scene occurs in the town of Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-55.) The text then states in verse 29, But the expert [of the law], wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my ...


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Luke 14:28-32 is about "counting the cost" in order to avoid being humiliated. To avoid humiliation: you wouldn't set about constructing a building without considering whether or not you had sufficient reason to believe you could finish it; you wouldn't contemplate going to war against an army larger than your own without considering whether or not you ...


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Keep in mind that the parable is given in the context of a lawyer who knows the commandments and seeks to justify himself by defining who should be considered his neighbor. Priests and Levites were people vocationally called to be ministers to God. Traditionally, they would have followed all the rituals and rules that were prescribed in the Law. The ...


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The question is whether the author known to us as Luke intended to portray Jesus by analogy as either of the characters in the parable of the Good Samaritan. Unfortunately there's no way of knowing the author's intent in this case. The New World Encyclopedia reference to Parable of the Good Samaritan offers some allegorical opinions, saying that according ...


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1. Question Restatement: NASB, Matt. 13:10 - And the disciples came and said to Him, “Why do You speak to them in parables?” 2. Quick Answer NASB, 1 Corinthians 2:8 - the wisdom which none of the rulers of this age has understood; for if they had understood it they would not have crucified the Lord of glory; NASB, Colossians 2:15 - When He ...


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It seems to me that the Author intends us to read the parable of the mustard seed and the parable of the leaven together, hence the periscope of v31-33: 31 Another parable He put forth to them, saying: "The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and sowed in his field, 32 "which indeed is the least of all the seeds; but when it ...


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I agree with the gist of several comments and previous answers that the oil does not need to have an specific symbolic meaning for the parable to make sense. That said, meaning can still be tied to the oil, and on that subject I think the questioner is on the right track. Meaning of parable as a whole To understand the (possible) meaning of the oil, one ...



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