Hot answers tagged

9

As far as the relevant wedding customs, Chuck Missler explains the traditional custom fairly well, as follows: 1) Betrothal - the marriage covenent is established, a price for the bride is negotiated and paid by the groom to the bride's family. There were also some symbolic rituals involved, but that's not so relevant to the question at hand. 2) ...


9

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


8

It can be somewhat dangerous exegetically to try to force too much meaning into a specific word or phrase from a parable. Parables are meant to be evocative illustrations (not encrypted cyphers), so dissecting them too rigidly is akin to assigning specific meaning to every brush stroke in a Van Gogh painting. The most important thing, when approaching one of ...


8

This answer is just a brief attempt at the leading question, "What is the meaning of this parable?" Interest is expressed in Matthew's version of the parable in particular. The "sower and seed" parable appears in each of the three Synoptic Gospels, Matt 13:3-25 // Mk 4:3-20 // Luke 8:5-15, with some variations in the parable and its explanation. This is ...


8

This one line "Where there is a dead body, there the vultures will gather." is an idiom. This would be the equivalent of saying, "Where there's smoke, there's fire." Long answer: Luke 17:31-37 31 On that day no one who is on the housetop, with possessions inside, should go down to get them. Likewise, no one in the field should go back for ...


7

Abstract Using the historical-grammatical method, whether a text should be taken allegorically depends on the genre of the text. Usually, the author provides sufficient clues to the genre for us to accurately determine if a text is to be taken as something more than the surface meaning. Genre One of the challenges of interpreting the Bible is that it ...


6

Meaning of κόκκῳ σινάπεως This is more or less just some additional information, Mike's answer is good. According to the IVP NT Commentary series: Scholars still dispute what plant is meant by the “mustard seed.” Nevertheless, by no conjecture is it the smallest of all seeds that Jesus’ listeners could have known (the orchid seed is smaller); the ...


6

It may likely grow into the Sinapis Nigra (Black Mustard). It can grow to eight feet tall, so it could actually be literally used by small birds to nest on its branches. However parables are not to be taken so literally and the image may be a slight exaggeration as part in parcel with the point of the passage. In the OT mustard is not mentioned. Yet ...


6

In short, I disagree with Keller's interpretation of the father. The father does what any compassionate father would do. He has to let the boys make mistakes, but he longs for a restored fellowship with them. I cannot see the mixing of attributes of the sons into the father. The father is not reckless like the younger son is. He is showing love, letting ...


6

While elsewhere in the New Testament marriage is used as a picture of Christ and his bride, that does not imply that the same picture should be imported into every parable and saying of Jesus. Consider Jesus' words elsewhere in Matthew: Then John’s disciples came and asked him, “How is it that we and the Pharisees fast often, but your disciples do not ...


5

This teaching session began when John the Baptist sent two disciples to question Jesus. Luke 7:15-19 (ESV) And the dead man sat up and began to speak, and Jesus gave him to his mother. Fear seized them all, and they glorified God, saying, “A great prophet has arisen among us!” and “God has visited his people!” And this report about him spread through ...


5

The parables’ interpretation hinges on the identity of Jesus’ brothers. While it is true that at least some of these “brothers” are in need, their need does not define them. The need simply identifies them as the “least.” Jesus, in Matthew 12:48, has already made known the identity of his “brothers.” Who are my mother and my brothers?” Then pointing ...


5

The clear questions posed might be worded this way: how, in Roman-era Palestine, would an imprisoned slave pay back a financial debt? The impetus comes from Jesus' parable of the unforgiving servant/slave of Matthew 18:21-35. It really requires an answer in two parts: first, to explain why the concern of OP's main question would not be in the thoughts of ...


4

Setting to the scene The parable of the Good Samaritan is told by Jesus shortly after an expert of the law summarizes the law into 1) Love God and 2) Love your neighbor. This scene occurs in the town of Jerusalem (Luke 9:51-55.) The text then states in verse 29, But the expert [of the law], wanting to justify himself, said to Jesus, “And who is my ...


3

A parable is not necessarily a story, although most parables in the Gospels are stories. Psalm 49:4 and Psalm 78:2 say that a "parable" is a "dark saying". Ezekiel 17: 2 says a parable is a riddle. Habakkuk 2:6 says a parable is a "taunting proverb". When you realize that parables are basically coded ways of speaking, then the parable of the fig tree is ...


3

The King James Version, which you are quoting, is an archaic translation written in the language of 1600s. It also tried to do a literal word-for-word translation, which led to some unusual phraseology, even for its day. If you look at a more modern translation, it is much more straightforward: The seed falling on rocky ground refers to someone who ...


3

I'm going to focus on just the explanation of the parable of the sower and not (for the moment) consider other explanations. Conveniently, that text is found in all three Synoptic gospels. Assuming Mark was the first written, we can get a pretty good idea of how Matthew handled the material: When you look at the diffs, the changes are: Plural => ...


3

From The Message: Matthew 24:23-28: The Arrival of the Son of Man 23-25"If anyone tries to flag you down, calling out, 'Here's the Messiah!' or points, 'There he is!' don't fall for it. Fake Messiahs and lying preachers are going to pop up everywhere. Their impressive credentials and dazzling performances will pull the wool over the eyes of even ...


3

The "oil" as Ray Steadman points out, is the Holy Spirit.(from here) With these revealing words from the Lord we can now discover what the oil signifies. Obviously, it was the lack of an adequate supply of oil which caused these foolish maidens to be met with the words, "I do not know you." They did, of course, have some oil when they began but it ...


3

The robe, ring & sandals help show the father’s high level of love, honor and authority for the son. The robe and the ring are symbolic of how well the father will be treating his son (i.e. somewhat like Jacob and Pharaoh treated the favorite son Joseph). Jacob honored Joseph by getting him a long tunic, and the jealous brothers saw how Jacob was the ...


3

Luke 14:28-32 is about "counting the cost" in order to avoid being humiliated. To avoid humiliation: you wouldn't set about constructing a building without considering whether or not you had sufficient reason to believe you could finish it; you wouldn't contemplate going to war against an army larger than your own without considering whether or not you ...


2

My dad told me that according to the (partial) preterists (those who emphasize that the first or primary fulfillment of many of the New Testament prophecies occurred in or before the destruction of Jerusalem, A.D. 70.), eagle is a reference to the Romans, who had the eagle as their banner. If you compare the parallel passage in Matthew 24:28, you will see ...


2

Marriage Process The marriage process in ancient Israel went like this: The agreement A man went to the girl's father's house and set up an agreement. Then they put the agreement in writing The bride price The man paid the bride price to the father. Technically, this gift belonged to the bride and it set her free from her parents. Once the bride price ...


2

The concept of smallness and from appearance wise ‘nothing’, causing largeness of surprising results, is applied by the used of Sinapis Nigra (Black Mustard) in two ways in the gospels. First, as in Mathew 17:20 the smallness is faith and the surprising results are miracles. The idea is that faith can be small as its object is God not itself. Second, as ...


2

The sheep and "the least of these my brothers" are mutually-defining. The kingdom of Jesus is a kingdom of koinonia, partnership. Just as Yahweh self-identifies with Abram his covenant partner in Gen 12:3 ("I will bless those who bless you, and those who curse you, I will curse"), Jesus says the same here regarding those in the kingdom. They are his ...


2

I think this parable means something totally different. A previous parable about the Parable of the Sower explains the 'birds' as the evil ones (Matt 13:19). Idioms in the Bible are consistent. Therefore, the mustard seeds starts in faith then something happens (false teaching - birds being evil ones, false preaching) and it becomes something that it was not ...


2

Short Answer: The prodigal son appears to have been repentant. A Disrespectful Demand? I don't think the explanation you heard holds water, for two reasons. First, the imperative mood has a "grammatical range" (similar to how vocabulary words have a semantic range); it can be used to indicate a command / demand, but it isn't always used this way. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible