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I agree with the general consensus here that there probably isn't a great deal of meaningful semantic distinction between Χριστὸς Ἰησοῦς and Ἰησοῦς Χριστὸς. However, there's an incidental morphologic irregularity that explains at least some of the variation. In NT Greek, the dative form of Ἰησοῦς is Ἰησοῦ, identical in form with the genitive.1 This leads ...


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Paul's Greek name - Παῦλος - is a transliteration from Latin to Greek of the Latin word for "small" - paulus. The Church Fathers emphasize the aspect of humility in Paul's choice of his new name. Augustine describes why Saul came to be called Paul in one of his Anti-Pelagian Writings: Accordingly Paul, who, although he was formerly called Saul, chose ...


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The significance of these two names must very much depends on whether there really was a name change from Saul to Paul, or whether Paul was given a Jewish name and a Greek or gentile name as a child - not an uncommon practice among the Jews. On the other hand, it was also quite common, even in Palestine, for Jews to be known only by a Greek name. Examples ...



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