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7

According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


5

The name Zoar in this passage is spelled צֽוֹעַר but elsewhere (Genesis 13:10, Genesis 14:2, etc.) is spelled צֹעַר. I mention the spelling variation, because it is easier to see the connection to the root verb, צָעַר (ṣāʿar), which means "to be, or grow, insignificant". That is, the only difference is the vocalization - both are צער (ṣʿr) in unpointed ...


4

Many of the names of people and locations in Genesis 2-4 seem to tell us about their recipients. It is sometimes suggested that the names indicate the profession of either brother: 'Cain' (possession) needs to possess land for agriculture, while 'Abel' (breath) herds animals. However, there is some possibility of a connection between the meaning of their ...


4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


3

I have a line of thought on this that leads to a conclusion that Lamech would have had what he considered divine insight into an expectation that his son, Noah, was likely destined to play a role of rescuer in the plans of God. Two of the antediluvian fathers listed in Gen.5 are said to have "walked with God". This is seemingly always taken by commentators ...


3

As OP notes, the names "Oholah" and "Oholibah" in Ezekiel 23:4 are identified as the capitals of the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) and the Southern Kingdom of Judah (Jerusalem) respectively. Typically commentators associate these obviously symbolic names with the Hebrew ʾōhel "tent". The Hebrew Names Again as noted by OP, these names are typically ...


1

One must not read Hebrew prepositions in a manner that they have an exact corresponding English preposition. Sometimes a preposition and adverb can share the same word, a phenomenon found both in English and in Hebrew. [על כן] = upon the fact, indeed. Most of the time, indeed would imply therefore. But for this case, the meaning of indeed is actually ...


1

I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


1

Analogy of Oholah and Oholibah There is some disagreement as to the actual significance of the meaning of the names but there is no disagreement as to the fact that they to be understood figuratively. Rashi, commenting on this passage calls them "nicknames". He further states, Samaria is the one I nickname Oholah, for from the beginning she became a ...


1

The name of the prophet is יִרְמְיָה (Jer. 28:6), יִרְמְיָהוּ (Jer. 1:1), and יִרְמִיָה (Dan. 9:2). A relatively accurate transliteration of these names would be Yirmeyah, Yirmeyahu, and Yirmiyah, respectively.


1

could be two explanations or both one name is reigning name one is personal Hebrew word roots "-z-z" root of Uzziah and "-z-r" root of Azariah , they both mean "strong" as playing on words. interesting note : Probably the best explanation is to regard one as a birth name and the other as a throne name taken at the time of his accession (A. ...


1

The medieval Jewish teacher Bahya ben Asher stated “the plain meaning” is that the Torah uses the names Jacob and Israel interchangeably. But, he adds: “From a more rational or scientific point of view we may detect a distinct pattern in the Torah sometimes choosing to refer to Yaakov by his original name and sometimes by his additional name. The ...



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