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7

According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


5

The name Zoar in this passage is spelled צֽוֹעַר but elsewhere (Genesis 13:10, Genesis 14:2, etc.) is spelled צֹעַר. I mention the spelling variation, because it is easier to see the connection to the root verb, צָעַר (ṣāʿar), which means "to be, or grow, insignificant". That is, the only difference is the vocalization - both are צער (ṣʿr) in unpointed ...


4

Many of the names of people and locations in Genesis 2-4 seem to tell us about their recipients. It is sometimes suggested that the names indicate the profession of either brother: 'Cain' (possession) needs to possess land for agriculture, while 'Abel' (breath) herds animals. However, there is some possibility of a connection between the meaning of their ...


4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


3

As OP notes, the names "Oholah" and "Oholibah" in Ezekiel 23:4 are identified as the capitals of the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) and the Southern Kingdom of Judah (Jerusalem) respectively. Typically commentators associate these obviously symbolic names with the Hebrew ʾōhel "tent". The Hebrew Names Again as noted by OP, these names are typically ...


3

I like your question (and I am very curious about it too), but I'm not sure if there can ever be a definitive answer. There doesn't appear to be enough information to say for sure. I find it equally interesting that, not only were they named, but the subsequent verse describes their beauty, and the inordinate value that Job placed upon them (elevating them ...


2

The title Christ should always be understood as a title as opposed to a proper last name as we might think of it. Not only because that is typically the rendering of the word 'christos,' but also that surname usage did not necessarily become ubiquitous among Hebrews until much later. Likely Jesus would have been known as 'Jesus son of Joseph' as in John ...


1

One must not read Hebrew prepositions in a manner that they have an exact corresponding English preposition. Sometimes a preposition and adverb can share the same word, a phenomenon found both in English and in Hebrew. [על כן] = upon the fact, indeed. Most of the time, indeed would imply therefore. But for this case, the meaning of indeed is actually ...


1

I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


1

Analogy of Oholah and Oholibah There is some disagreement as to the actual significance of the meaning of the names but there is no disagreement as to the fact that they to be understood figuratively. Rashi, commenting on this passage calls them "nicknames". He further states, Samaria is the one I nickname Oholah, for from the beginning she became a ...


1

The name of the prophet is יִרְמְיָה (Jer. 28:6), יִרְמְיָהוּ (Jer. 1:1), and יִרְמִיָה (Dan. 9:2). A relatively accurate transliteration of these names would be Yirmeyah, Yirmeyahu, and Yirmiyah, respectively.



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