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7

Let me give you an example. In one verse, Lot is said to be Avram's brother (Gen. 14:16: אֶת־לֹוט אָחִיו). Elsewhere, Lot is described as the son of Haran (Gen. 11:31: וְאֶת־לֹוט בֶּן־הָרָן), Avram's brother (Gen. 14:12: בֶּן־אֲחִי אַבְרָם). Strictly speaking, this would make Lot, Avram's nephew. So, we see that a nephew (as Lot is to Avram) is referred to ...


7

Interestingly, unlike other biblical characters, we are never told of a "name change" with reference to Paul. Rather, Acts 13:9 tells us that Saul "also is called Paul." Given that Paul was, according to Acts, born a Roman citizen, it is highly likely that he had a Roman name (Paulus) from birth. At the same time, his parents were devout Jews, and therefore ...


7

According to a variety of commentaries the name Abram means "high father" while Abraham means "Father of a multitude". The reason it is only "probably" in your commentary is because the usage of the word raham is not clearly attested to in ancient Hebrew itself, but only in closely related languages. Ellicott's Commentary explains it well, plus offers a ...


5

The name Zoar in this passage is spelled צֽוֹעַר but elsewhere (Genesis 13:10, Genesis 14:2, etc.) is spelled צֹעַר. I mention the spelling variation, because it is easier to see the connection to the root verb, צָעַר (ṣāʿar), which means "to be, or grow, insignificant". That is, the only difference is the vocalization - both are צער (ṣʿr) in unpointed ...


5

1Sa 9:2 And he had a son, whose name [was] Saul, a choice young man, and a goodly: and [there was] not among the children of Israel a goodlier person than he: from his shoulders and upward [he was] higher than any of the people. Php 3:5 Circumcised the eighth day, of the stock of Israel, [of] the tribe of Benjamin, an Hebrew of the Hebrews; as ...


5

Background The NET Bible notes on Genesis 21:30: The name Beer Sheba (בְּאֵר שָׁבַע, bÿ’er shava’) means “well of the oath” or “well of the seven.” Both the verb “to swear” and the number “seven” have been used throughout the account. Now they are drawn in as part of the explanation of the significance of the name. Genesis 26:33 actually says that the ...


4

The name was probably "Nevel", meaning "Harp". He was apparently a loyalist to the House of Saul living in Judah, which shows you how successful Saul was in maintain discipline in the kingdom, but which did not endear him to the author of I Samuel, who clearly sides with David and sees Nevel as a traitor to the tribe of Judah and calls him Naval. A Saul ...


4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


4

The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


4

Many of the names of people and locations in Genesis 2-4 seem to tell us about their recipients. It is sometimes suggested that the names indicate the profession of either brother: 'Cain' (possession) needs to possess land for agriculture, while 'Abel' (breath) herds animals. However, there is some possibility of a connection between the meaning of their ...


4

On the surface, this question sounds unanswerable. What do we know about Lamech? He lived 777 years, dying approximately 5 years before the flood. Methuselah, Lamech's father, died within a year of the flood (as late as in the flood, but this isn't known). Lamech's lifespan was unusually short (118 years shorter than anyone else whose age at death is ...


3

As OP notes, the names "Oholah" and "Oholibah" in Ezekiel 23:4 are identified as the capitals of the Northern Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) and the Southern Kingdom of Judah (Jerusalem) respectively. Typically commentators associate these obviously symbolic names with the Hebrew ʾōhel "tent". The Hebrew Names Again as noted by OP, these names are typically ...


3

I have a line of thought on this that leads to a conclusion that Lamech would have had what he considered divine insight into an expectation that his son, Noah, was likely destined to play a role of rescuer in the plans of God. Two of the antediluvian fathers listed in Gen.5 are said to have "walked with God". This is seemingly always taken by commentators ...


3

I like your question (and I am very curious about it too), but I'm not sure if there can ever be a definitive answer. There doesn't appear to be enough information to say for sure. I find it equally interesting that, not only were they named, but the subsequent verse describes their beauty, and the inordinate value that Job placed upon them (elevating them ...


3

Long Hebrew names are made up of smaller words. The two-letter subroot 'Meth' means death. I believe Hirsh interprets the dead to be the 'ignoble masses' rather than unpack it from the name. Strong sometimes interprets it to mean 'man' but most of the time in translation it is referring to a 'few men' and often to a few men who were doomed, or apparently ...


3

According to strong’s definition, Yakin יָכִין means He will establish. While Boaz who was an ancestor of David means quickness בֹּ֫עַז . However as the meaning of Boaz is uncertain in Hebrew it would be better to follow the Septuagint where according to Barne’s Notes on the Bible in the margin reference is translated Boaz Ἰσχύς as ‘Strength.’ “The ...


3

The first two valleys use the word "emek". The names appear to be purely symbolic in context though the Jehosaphat valley might be associated with a historical event connected with the king of the same name, see Wikipedia. Most of the traditional commentators say that the valleys in 4:12 and 4:14 (Yehoshaphat and "Decision") are the same valley. The name in ...


3

We should distinguish between the idiom of the prophet and the later theological interpretations of the text. Ben Adam in Hebrew (Aramaic bar Enosh) expresses the distinction in ancient thought between the mortal and immortal actors in the world drama - between humans and gods in Greek and Roman thought, and between humans and God in Israelite thought. In ...


3

When Jesus addressed the crowds on the mount/plain would they have understood "thy name" to be Eil and Elaha (also written as Alaha). See: 'What word did Jesus use for God in Aramaic?' Matthew's Gospel was written in Greek for a Greek-speaking audience. We know that the Old Testament references used in Matthew were from the Septuagint, so the author did not ...


2

From the more immediate meaning it may have been a simple way for God to humble Ezekiel for he had given him many visions about the future. The same thing was required of Paul on account of his ‘surpassingly great revelations’ (2 Cor 12:7). Yet as (כל הנביאים כולן לא נתנבאו אלא לימות המשיח Sanh. 99a) "All the prophets prophesied not but of the days of the ...


2

The Name Israel is the God-bestowed (spiritual) name given to Jacob after he prevailed at Bethel, and the name pertains to the continuation of the promises given to Abraham, passed to Isaac and then taken by Jacob when Isaac passed the birthright blessing to him. Although the names Jacob and Israel may appear to be used more or less interchangeably in ...


2

It is important to look at this passage as a whole and to consider what is going on in it. Zechariah 12:10-14 “And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and pleas for mercy, so that, when they look on me, on him whom they have pierced, they shall mourn for him, as one mourns for an only child, and weep ...


2

The title Christ should always be understood as a title as opposed to a proper last name as we might think of it. Not only because that is typically the rendering of the word 'christos,' but also that surname usage did not necessarily become ubiquitous among Hebrews until much later. Likely Jesus would have been known as 'Jesus son of Joseph' as in John 6:...


1

One must not read Hebrew prepositions in a manner that they have an exact corresponding English preposition. Sometimes a preposition and adverb can share the same word, a phenomenon found both in English and in Hebrew. [על כן] = upon the fact, indeed. Most of the time, indeed would imply therefore. But for this case, the meaning of indeed is actually ...


1

I suggest it is more useful to look at the context of the name changes rather than the coincidence of spelling changes. A great many of the names of people we find in the Book of Genesis have meanings quite relevant to the story of the persons concerned. As stated, Abram means 'High Father', or perhaps better, 'Exalted Father', while Abraham means 'Father of ...


1

Analogy of Oholah and Oholibah There is some disagreement as to the actual significance of the meaning of the names but there is no disagreement as to the fact that they to be understood figuratively. Rashi, commenting on this passage calls them "nicknames". He further states, Samaria is the one I nickname Oholah, for from the beginning she became a ...


1

We need to start with Mark's Gospel, as this is the earliest source available to us. Matthew's Gospel is known to have been based substantially on Mark and, when copying the original gospel, its anonymous author sometimes resolves what he sees as errors in Mark's Gospel. An example is in Mark 5:1, where Jesus crossed the Sea of Galilee to the land of the ...


1

The name of the prophet is יִרְמְיָה (Jer. 28:6), יִרְמְיָהוּ (Jer. 1:1), and יִרְמִיָה (Dan. 9:2). A relatively accurate transliteration of these names would be Yirmeyah, Yirmeyahu, and Yirmiyah, respectively.



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