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The Idea in Brief The image of blood and water appears in the Red Sea crossing in addition to the crossing of the River Jordan into the Promised Land. That is, each crossing occurred in tandem with the Passover Sacrifice and Feast, and therefore appear as parallel chronological events (since they occurred in tandem with Passover). In the former instance, ...


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The text is saying that all were baptised "into Moses" in the cloud and in the sea: 2 καὶ πάντες εἰς τὸν Μωϋσῆν ⸀ἐβαπτίσαντο ἐν τῇ νεφέλῃ καὶ ἐν τῇ θαλάσσῃ, (SBLGNT 1Co 10.2) It appears as both baptisms, cloud and sea, together represent one baptism: that "into Moses". The New Testament talks about a baptism of all believers in a body (of Christ) in ...


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Talmud answers the seeming "contradictions" between Numbers and Deuteronomy. The rabbis indicated that the Lord had commanded Moses "to send for himself" (that is, for Moses) the spies into the land. The Talmud mentions Deut 1:23, when Moses indicates that sending the spies had pleased him (that is, not God, but Moses). The following citation comes from ...


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Regardless of whether Moses initiated the idea of sending spies onto Canaan or whether he did so at God's command, Moses was in practice the one who sent the spies. However, Numbers 13:17b-20, authorship of which is generally attributed to the Yahwist Source, is closer to Deuteronomy 1:21-23 than is Numbers 13:1-17a, in which (Numbers 13:1-2) God told Moses ...


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Yes it would be wrong to say that the Red Sea represents the blood of the Lord Jesus Christ. The baptism takes place because of the cloud that guided the Israelites.It was a cloud of Water and Fire and Jesus would baptise with fire as recorded in The book of Matthew .The Israelites were not under the sea-but they were under the cloud (baptism).The sea ...


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Typological-theological perspective My understanding from this passage and other NT texts is that the blood of the Passover Lamb represents Jesus' blood, while the Red Sea represents baptism. The reason this can be confusing (if I'm following your question) is that both the Red Sea crossing (type) and baptism (antitype) seem to be salvific in texts like ...


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Good question! Commentators seem divided over whether Paul's vow in Acts 18:18 is 1) The beginning of a nazarite vow, 2) the completion of a nazarite vow, or 3) a different kind of vow altogether. 1) It is the beginning of a nazarite vow. Though nothing is said about the necessity of hair-cutting at the beginning of a vow, it is not unreasonable to think ...



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