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4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


3

The word translated 'heads' in the KJV is רֹאשׁ and like most words it has a wide semantic range, it can mean 'head' as in a part of the body, but it can also refer to 'a head' as in a leader or chief (among other things), see for example: Exodus 6:14 These are the heads of their fathers' houses: The sons of Reuben, the firstborn of Israel, were ...


3

According to rabbinic sources, women, children, and slaves, are not required to fulfill any commandment which is classified as a "מצות עשה שהזמן גרמא" (mitzvat asei shehazman gerama), a positive commandment dependent on time: וכל מצות עשה שהזמן גרמה אנשים חיבין ונשים פטורות, וכל מצות עשה שלא הזמן גרמה אחד אנשים ואחד נשים חיבין. (Mishna Kiddushin 1:7, ...


2

The way I read it the "take vengeance" part includes both the battle and the removal of all of the followers of Balaam son of Beor just as it is written.


1

I do believe there was a book written about this. The point isn't that the sacrifices were seasoned with salt but instead there was an exchange of salt. Or the way I see it is God provides the salt, from the earth, and we exchange it with Him in an offering. Let's remember this was around 3,000 years ago. Salt was like gold, rare and only for the wealthy. ...


1

The phrase you reference in the NASB (same wording in KJV, others) appears to come from וְקַרְקַר כָּל-בְּנֵי-שֵׁת (copied from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, same text found elsewhere too). שֵׁת is almost always translated as Sheth or Seth, but there are those who have translated it differently. The meaning of the name is tumult. The meanings of names ...


1

those verses do not mention the Messiah they are just understood to be a reference to the Messiah. The Messiah in Judaism simply means a person anointed to fulfill a purpose outlined in the Jewish Bible. For instance Cyrus the Persian was called Moshiach in Isaiah 45.1. In the context of the star prophesy, a warrior-king shall arise from within Israel and be ...


1

This passage should be read within the context of both Psalms 72:8 and Numbers 24:19 because both verses use the word "dominion" (V'yared) and only Moshiach (Messiah) will have "dominion" from "the River to the ends of the earth" as David says in Psalms 72:8, May his empire stretch from sea to sea, from the [Euphrates] River to the ends of the earth. ...



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