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17

The (relatively) small amount of bronze needed to make that serpent/snake (or נְחַשׁ נְחֹשֶׁת nĕḥaš nĕḥōšet) in the story of Num 21:4-9,1 even if it was as large as the monument now on Mount Nebo in Jordan,... ...would still have been quite small compared to the amount of bronze (let alone silver and gold) needed to make the utensils required for the ...


9

The question as posed has done pretty much all the "homework" already! Here is how they look in Codex Leningrad: In the scholarly literature, a fairly authoritative answer comes from Israel Yeivin's discussion in Introduction to the Tiberian Masorah (Scholars Press, 1985), § 81 (pp. 46-7) as well as Emanuel Tov, Textual Criticism of the Hebrew Bible (Van ...


6

This was taken from the Shabbat Tractate of the Babylonian Talmud(Mishna): The rabbis taught: Before the passage [Numb. x. 35]: "And it came to pass when the ark set forward, that Moses said, etc.," and at the close of the next verse, the Holy One, blessed be He, made signs (the inverted letter Nun, which must be inserted in the Scroll) in order to ...


4

It seems to me that there are two interconnected problems raised by the formulation of the question. I think it would help to disentangle them: "meek" v. "humble" The question of contrasting "meek" and "humble" is bound up with changing English usage. "meek" tends to be somewhat quaint in usage, and certainly not so prevalent in English usage as it once ...


3

The word translated 'heads' in the KJV is רֹאשׁ and like most words it has a wide semantic range, it can mean 'head' as in a part of the body, but it can also refer to 'a head' as in a leader or chief (among other things), see for example: Exodus 6:14 These are the heads of their fathers' houses: The sons of Reuben, the firstborn of Israel, were ...


3

A covenant of salt in the Bible The term covenant of salt is found three times in the Old Testament: First occurrence Leviticus 2:13 `And every offering of your grain offering you shall season with salt; you shall not allow the salt of the covenant of your God to be lacking from your grain offering. With all your offerings you shall offer ...


3

It is not known for certain whether the Cushite woman and Zipporah are one and the same. Some Rabbinic commentators, including Rashi, point out that this wife is mentioned nowhere else in the Torah. Therefore, the Cushite woman from Numbers 12:1 must be referring to Zipporah. Other commentators cite the Chronicles of Moses, which is an early Midrashic ...


2

As was described in this Mi Yodeya article, priests only actually worked in the temple for 2 days a year. This is a result of the priests being divided up into 24 groups (mishmarim) for Temple service, with each group being further subdivided by family. So even priests over the age of thirty would have had a lot of time on their hands to do things other ...


2

Talmud answers the seeming "contradictions" between Numbers and Deuteronomy. The rabbis indicated that the Lord had commanded Moses "to send for himself" (that is, for Moses) the spies into the land. The Talmud mentions Deut 1:23, when Moses indicates that sending the spies had pleased him (that is, not God, but Moses). The following citation comes from ...


2

Regardless of whether Moses initiated the idea of sending spies onto Canaan or whether he did so at God's command, Moses was in practice the one who sent the spies. However, Numbers 13:17b-20, authorship of which is generally attributed to the Yahwist Source, is closer to Deuteronomy 1:21-23 than is Numbers 13:1-17a, in which (Numbers 13:1-2) God told Moses ...


2

The Idea in Brief The image of blood and water appears in the Red Sea crossing in addition to the crossing of the River Jordan into the Promised Land. That is, each crossing occurred in tandem with the Passover Sacrifice and Feast, and therefore appear as parallel chronological events (since they occurred in tandem with Passover). In the former instance, ...


2

Good question! Commentators seem divided over whether Paul's vow in Acts 18:18 is 1) The beginning of a nazarite vow, 2) the completion of a nazarite vow, or 3) a different kind of vow altogether. 1) It is the beginning of a nazarite vow. Though nothing is said about the necessity of hair-cutting at the beginning of a vow, it is not unreasonable to think ...


2

Verse 9 clarifies that it was a BRONZE serpent that was made, in the NIV. In many other translations ti is also worded as bronze, but in some, as brass.


1

While it is unclear whether a nomadic people would have the means to mine, smelt, and smith metals sufficient to the needs mentioned in Exodus and Numbers, the Israelites may have accessed such technology and materials through their Midian and Kenite relations who lived nearby. Both groups were known for their mining and metalworking skills.[1] The ...


1

All the congregation of Israel I believe we can say that "all the elders of your tribes, and your officers" is [somtimes] equivalent to "all the congregation of Israel" in scripture. Practically it would have been impossible for one man to address the entire nation without some sort of miracle (and we don't read of that). It also seems that the Jewish ...


1

The context is that Miriam and Aaron were gossiping about Moses. God intervenes and tells them that unlike other prophets, including Miriam and Aaron, to whom he speaks via dreams, God speaks to Moses while he is awake and they have entire conversations. Of course, he does not literally speak with him face to face, as God does not have such a face that a ...


1

There is much to be understood, before explaining what the testimony actually is; Since the Hebrews had been enslaved in Egypt they had forgotten how to serve God, and God; through Moses; was teaching them how he was to be worshipped. We must begin in the book of Exodus and build up to answering your question. All Scripture is quoted from the King James ...


1

The general rules for the treatment of human captives were laid out in Deut.20:10-17a: When you march up to attack a city [far from the ‘promised land’], make its people an offer of peace. If they accept and open their gates, all the people in it shall be subject to forced labor and shall work for you. If they refuse to make peace and they ...


1

Moses did the same thing that Nadab and Abihu did in Leviticus 10, and the same thing that Saul did in 1 Samuel 15--almost what God said but not quite. God told Moses to speak to the rock and water would come out. Moses strikes the rock. As a result he is not allowed to go into the Promised Land. God gave specific instructions as to how priests were to ...



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