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1. Use of the Hebrew word satan The Hebrew word satan means, in a general sense, 'opponent', 'adversary', or 'accuser'. As with any word in any language, satan does not have a one-size-fits-all application. It can mean different things in different contexts. In my answer on this question, I surveyed a few of the Hebrew texts that use the word satan. On one ...


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From Constable's "Notes" in the NET Bible: The statement of Moses’ humility (v. 3) was not a boastful claim by the writer but an inspired statement of fact. We need not conclude that another writer added it later since it is essential to the argument of this passage. That another writer added it later is a distinct possibility, however. One writer ...


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Not entirely sure that there is just one, or even two answers to this conundrum. I have pondered this on many occasions and done some research as well. Some of the answers I have come across are: Anger. Moses got angry and his anger lead him to not follow his instructions properly so I suppose you could say anger resulting in disobedience...? Pride. He ...


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What we must remember is that this is the 2nd time Moses is addressing the "Rock". God's commandment to Moses was explicit,(Ex. 17:5-6) And the Lord said unto Moses, Go on before the people, and take with thee of the elders of Israel; and thy rod, wherewith thou smotest the river, take in thine hand, and go. 6 Behold, I will stand before thee ...


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Numbers 20:12 gives two reasons: 1) Moses did not believe God and 2) failed to sanctify God. Moses knew striking the rock before had brought forth water and did not believe speaking alone would bring the same results. His attitude and statement "must we" indicate the failure to sanctify God. A parallel would be being baptized into Christ (Galatians 3:27) ...


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Jewish tradition holds that the written Torah was dictated by God to Moses, and that Moses had no discretion as to what to write, even the last verses of the Torah that describe his death. See Rashi to Deut. 34:5. Although Moses had to write down everything as dictated, traditional commentators believe that he found a way to make a personal statement that ...


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Obviously, it could only have at best been written by Joshua. Moses received the Torah, and perhaps a confirmation of the oral and written history that had pervaded/preceded the culture of Israel. Then someone else would have to write it down. Otherwise, the ending passage of Deuteronomy was also written by Moses? How could a dead Moses have written his ...



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