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In the original Hebrew we find the LORD (yud-hey-vahv-hey) says to my Lord (Adonee). The second lord, being in the singular, is referring to a human king or nobleman. In historical context it becomes clear that this psalm, written by David, was meant to be sung by the kohenim during temple liturgy. The kohenim would sing "The LORD says to my lord (king ...


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The short answer to OP's question regarding the teaching in James 2:10: Is it in the torah? is: "No". A much longer answer discusses James's teaching as derived from Jesus (depending on Douglas Moo), and the essentials are given there. It is important to note, however, that this understanding of the law (i.e., breaking one bit is like breaking the ...


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James explains the reasoning employed in verse 10 in the immediately following verses: For he who said, "Do not commit adultery," also said, "Do not murder." Now if you do not commit adultery but do commit murder, you have become a violator of the law. (Jas 2:11-12 ESV) James is expressing the Jewish view (shared by Romans) that the law was ...


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The Epistle of James consists of moral exhortation, with the source and authority for this wisdom taken for granted by the author. In spite of the attribution to James (either James brother of Jesus or James son of Zebedee), the author never quotes Jesus and never relies on Jesus as the authority for what he writes. So the first thing we can say is that the ...



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