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18

The author of Hebrews is quoting Habakkuk 2:4 from the Septuagint (as opposed to the Hebrew.) In the Hebrew, this part of the verse would literally translate something like this: "Behold the scornful; his mind shall not be happy" (Stuart) (Part of the difficulty in translating Heb. 10:38 is that this is an English translation of a Greek interpretation ...


10

A few points to make here. As you noted, the Greek here is a bit slightly ambiguous and could go either way. For the purpose of your question, we are assuming a particular reading, so I will avoid that discussion here. But let's back up a bit, and see the whole quote: On the last day of the feast, the great day, Jesus stood up and cried out, “If anyone ...


10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


9

I had to outline Stephen's speech to see if he answered the question directly: Abraham was given a promise of a land. His father stood in the way. So Abraham did not receive the inheritance. Joseph was given the promise of a kingdom. His brothers stood in the way. So he did not get the kingdom he looked for (asking for his bones to be carried out of ...


8

There is no Old Testament verse that speaks of living water flowing from within a person. However, we can see this imagery throughout the Old Testament. Imagery This passage is a prophecy of Zechariah, which is talking about God destroying the enemies of Israel: Zechariah 14:8 (NASB) And in that day living waters will flow out of Jerusalem, half ...


8

One explanation is that the Hebrew נֵ֫צֶר "branch" (transliterated nazer, netser or so) is related to Nazarene. Isaiah's usage of the word can be seen as prophetic, especially in Isaiah 11:1: Source / Further reading: Miller, Fred P. Isaiah's Use of the word "Branch" or Nazarene.


7

Acts 7 takes 8 to 9 minutes to read out loud and most of it is Stephen's speech. So that's a fairly long answer to the question "Are these things so?" However, Acts 6:8-15 makes clear that this speech is essentially Stephen's defense against a charge of blasphemy. From that perspective, he wasn't give much time at all. So what are we to make of this ...


6

No, the problem they were asking isn't about polygamy. The problem they were struggling with is regarding adultery. The problem with adultery is that the woman is married to multiple men: Matthew 5:32 (NASB) but I say to you that everyone who divorces his wife, except for the reason of unchastity, makes her commit adultery; and whoever marries a ...


6

There were many things that Matthew did not understand about the ministry of Christ until after Jesus death, burial, resurrection, and ascension. The references that the prophets made about the Messiah were likely high on that list. The beauty of most of the references about the messiah is that they were already understood in the historical context which ...


6

Stephen's long and meandering history may not appear to have a point, let alone answer the charges leveled against him. But Stephen is indeed addressing these charges: “This man never ceases to speak words against this holy place and the law, for we have heard him say that this Jesus of Nazareth will destroy this place and will change the customs ...


6

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


5

The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


5

Implicit in the question is another question - do the NT authors serve as a model for interpretation of OT texts? I think the short the answer is 'not necessarily'. Both the OT and NT authors spoke from God by the Holy Spirit - they both spoke into particular contexts, and with their own particular styles, but they did not need to perform exegesis on other ...


4

Good question. There are many fascinating aspects of Paul's hermeneutic that come to the fore here, and we need to do some digging to recognize the source of the connections which he makes. How is Hagar connected to Sinai? First, the connection is there simply in terms of Paul's own controlling metaphor. Throughout Gal 3:22 and onward, Paul has been ...


4

Both Psalm 69 and Psalm 109 are psalms of David. Both are, as well, psalms of vindication. In Psalm 69, David's enemies seek to destroy him without cause (v4), so David prays out against them that God would vindicate him against them. Similarly in Psalm 109, David has been betrayed by his friend(s). Therefore, David prays that God would destroy his enemies. ...


4

INDICATIONS OF LXX PROVERBS 1:7 IN GREEK NEW TESTAMENT(?) Conlusion: There are indications (reasons) to believe the LXX of Proverbs 1:7 has an canonical-theological influence, but the specific evidence of a references to this verse in the Gk. New Testament appears to be indeterminate. Nevertheless, we ourselves, may be reminded, wherever we read εὐσέβεια ...


4

This would take a book to answer well, but here's the gist: Israel out of Egypt? Israel in the Pentateuch was typological of God's people (cf. 1 Cor. 10) (God's people would have to leave "Egypt", pass through the "water", follow God through the "wilderness", live by God's "law", etc.) Israel failed to actually be God's people (cf. Hos. 11 and the rest ...


3

Jesus' childhood departure from Israel signified His exit from spiritual Egypt. If His departure from physical Egypt was in mind here, verse 21 would have been the only suitable place to note the prophesy fulfillment. 21 And he arose, and took the young child and his mother, and came into the land of Israel. Instead, the fulfillment verse is placed ...


3

In the case of Moses the manna is clear. In dire straights God provided what was needed to be sustained in a desert without food and water. God preserved them. Therefore ‘man shall not live by bread alone’ means man must rely on God who gives life and sustains life in providing anything we need. In the case of Jesus, He is referring to the manna as God’s ...


3

For what it's worth, Matthew uses the same approach with the Prophets. For example: Matthew 1:22-23 All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet: "Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel," which means, "God is with us." pulls a phrase from the middle of Isaiah ...


3

The context is the most important clue to Paul’s line of thinking. He has been telling the Galatians that to turn back to the Law after being set free of it through the grace of Christ is foolish. If the righteous live by faith, those that rely on the law are under condemnation, because man cannot be justified by the law. With that background, his thinking ...


3

The Tanakh (the Old Testament) is replete with prophecies concerning the Messiah. Beginning with Genesis 3:15, also called the protoevangelium, there are hints, allusions, and explicit references to the identity, the roles, and the work of the promised Messiah. Jesus explained (likely) every one of them in His conversation with Cleopas and an unnamed ...


2

I will try to answer your first question, What is his method of exegesis? If we figure that the Apostle Paul was "educated at the feet of Gamaliel" about Jewish religious law Acts 23:3. He had to use the the Jewish traditions of interpretation· and exegesis that were used at the time, a very common is the Pardes, an acronym formed from the name initials ...


2

Martin Luther gives a good explanation in his Commentary on Galatians: [In Romans 9, Paul] argues that all the children of Abraham are not the children of God. For Abraham had two kinds of children, children born of the promise, like Isaac, and other children born without the promise, as Ishmael. With this argument Paul squelched the proud Jews who ...


2

There are many theological reasons for answering one way or another, but theology aside, I think there are some very important hermeneutical reasons for saying no. What not to do When we interpret symbols, it is very important that we interpret them in context. It is very poor procedure to attempt to assign symbolic meaning to a word everywhere it appears ...


2

The Lord Jesus' use of the text, taken in the wider context of his teachings, is perfectly aligned with the original account of the manna in Exodus 16, and also with Moses' epexegetical comments, when they are understood in their context. The Giving of the Manna The people were truly, legitimately hungry. Yahweh had just delivered them from Egypt, and ...


2

I see what you are getting at. In the ESV it does seem to speak just the way you say (my expanded paraphrase): Shall I save these wicked people from Sheol? (Of course not!) Shall I redeem them from Death (Of course not!) ...But speaking of ‘redeem’ I will insert this confusing prophecy. For although I said ‘Of course not!' I will reject my people ...


2

From the clutches of the grave I would ransom them, from death I would redeem them; I will be your words of death; I will decree the grave upon you. Remorse shall be hidden from My eyes. -From the Complete Jewish Bible I will ransom them from the power of the grave; I will redeem them from death: O death, I will be thy plagues; O grave, I will ...


2

Both On the one hand, Matthew seems to link the fulfillment to the journey to Egypt. But the quotation from Hosea makes clear that the journey from Egypt (the Exodus) was what Hosea had in mind. (But see also: Is Hosea 11:1 referencing the initiation of the Exodus or the sojourn in Egypt?) Since Jesus was born in Judea, it would be necessary for him to ...


2

I don't think you necessarily have to pick one over the other. It's clear that Herod is a new Pharaoh, killing all the boy babies and that Jesus is a new Moses, escaping the slaughter so he can come back and set His people free. It is also true that He physically went down to Egypt and came back, thus fulfilling the prophecy both ways. Matthew's positioning ...



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