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13

Well modesty does mean much more in the Bible than what it means in our modern culture, but the best view I've seen is the maternal incest idea. "Uncover Nakedness" is used in Leviticus to describe heterosexual incest the "nakedness of the father" is identified with the "nakedness of your mother" (Lev 18:7-8) If this is about Ham's incestuous sex with his ...


11

There are some very close similarities but also some drastic differences. For similarities, there are a hero who builds a boat to preserve those chosen by a god. They build the boat with levels inside and seal it with bitumen. Both gather his family and animals in the Ark. The floods come. After the flood, they dismebark and sacrifice to the gods. Those ...


10

On why Canaan and not Cham, I asked on Mi Yodeya and among the possibilities suggested in this answer is that God had already blessed Noach's sons and you can't counter a blessing with a curse. So even if Noach had intended to curse Cham, he couldn't and went for his son instead. (There are other opinions there too, but that's the only one so far that ...


9

If we look at verses beyond Genesis 6, we get more information on Noah's righteousness. Eze 14:13 Son of man, if a country sins against Me by committing unfaithfulness, and I stretch out My hand against it, destroy its supply of bread, send famine against it and cut off from it both man and beast, Eze 14:14 even though these three men, Noah, Daniel ...


9

The text tells us that he was both "a righteous man" and "blameless in his generation". The latter seems to be pretty clear that he was the best of that lot, as you comment in the question, but that still leaves us with "Noah was a righteous man". Also, he merited to be saved (with his family) when God could have wiped out everybody and restarted. So a ...


8

Yes, it is the common practice to translate from the original language into the some word in the destination language rather than leaving it as the source language. Words like this are notoriously difficult to translate because the interpreters have to pick some word in the destination language that will make sense to the readers of that language. ...


8

According to evidence presented by P.J. Wiseman concerning the toledoth, the Genesis account was written by eyewitnesses to the events and therefor is the primary and older source. The word translated 'generations' in the repeated formula "these are the generations of" should be considered the signature line on a clay tablet, and Genesis read as a string of ...


8

Observations on the Genesis flood It was not a historical event in the technical sense that we have no surviving written contemporary accounts. However, it was recent enough prehistory that it could be located in a particular location in the Genesis genealogies. There are also a number of details that suggest a robust oral history from the time of the ...


7

I can't comment on the Epic of Gilgamesh, an ancient poem from Mesopotamia, but interestingly your observation about the Hebrew is identical to Luther's. the carelessness of a translator has given rise to a question in connection with this passage. The Hebrew does not say that the raven did not return, as Jerome renders it. There was, therefore, no need ...


7

These 3 enigmas or problems can only be solved if fatherhood and childhood (life) are calculated from conception forward. Otherwise the math won't work. The 3 problems above have us return to 2 key facts. Then we can resolve the math issues. -Who entered and who left the ark? -How long did the flood last? (How long was Noah on the ark such that ...


6

In the original post Gen 11:10 is only partially cited, like this - Gn 11:10 When Shem was 100 years old, he became the father of Arpachshad… although in the OP answer, the rest of the verse is quoted: Gen 11:10 ...Shem was 100 years old, and begat Arpachshad 2 years after the flood. Of course, that end phrase ("two years after the flood") solves ...


6

Genesis 5:32 does not say that Noah was 500 years old exactly when he had Shem, it says: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham, and Japheth. (KJV) with the colon in there it disconnects the births from his age. The five hundred years is there to note when God gave him his marching orders. It shows us in concert with Genesis ...


4

As noted by Luther quoted in this answer, and also rabbinic literature I've seen but can't now find, when the raven flew "to and fro" it was feeding on the bodies floating in the receding floodwaters. The raven is a carrion-eater and the flood had provided it an endless buffet. The raven therefore had no need to return to the ark. Another interpretation ...


4

The Midrash (as quoted by Rashi) records a disagreement about exactly this topic. Either it means “he was relatively righteous for his generation” or it means “he was righteous even in his perverted generation”. Note that the two explanations are not quite contradictory; and a case can be made that this ambiguity in language is deliberately implying both ...


4

Below are charts to help visually facilitate understanding of this enigma in exploration of various solutions: One difficulty that must be addressed is that Genesis 7:6 says, "Noah was six hundred years old when the floodwaters were on the earth." If this is taken chronologically then the phrase in the 600th year of Noah's life cannot refer to the year ...


3

I believe the better explanation is the common practice of rounding numbers. Shem was ca. 100 years old when the flood began, though his exact age may have been 98. Similarly, David reigned 7 1/2 years over Judah, 33 years over all Israel, and 40 years total (2Sam 5:5): unless one assumes one of these numbers are rounded, one has a serious problem. ...


3

The apparent contradiction is made plain by simply reading the passage carefully: 19 And of every living thing of all flesh, two [of every sort] shalt thou bring into the ark, to keep them alive with thee; they shall be male and female. Please notice that [of every sort] is not in the original language. The emphasis is that the animals will be ...


3

The overarching theme of the flood narrative is of 'un-creation' and 're-creation'. This is seen not least in the explicit textual parallels with Genesis 1, for example: And God blessed them, saying, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the waters in the seas, and let birds multiply on the earth.” Genesis 1:22, ESV And God blessed them. And God said ...


2

There is another possible explanation for Noah's use of a raven, regardless of its spiritual significance. Sending out ravens was an early maritime method of identifying if a ship was close to land and in which direction the land was. The Landnamabok manuscript, for example, recounts the story of Floki Vilgeroarson, who in the 9th century was the first ...


2

This is not really a direct answer to the question so much as some tangential musing on the Hebrew alphabet and "unknown" words, specifically as they relate to this passage. However, it might also lend some support to the "cypress" translation as well. Gopher/cypress: Strongs H1613 גֹּפֶר gphr / go'fer; "from an unused root, probably meaning to house in". ...


2

As you noted, the Great Flood story is detailed to even the day. The wording shows us in 3 different ways (making it indisputable) that only Noah, his wife, his 3 sons, and his sons’ wives got into the ark, and only they got out later. That point, some math, and the detail below, lead to one conclusion. A man can’t possibly become a father when his child is ...


2

In the last 5 verses of Genesis it seems Joseph’s age at death is given twice. Joseph dies at about 110 That isn’t done for anyone else, which made me believe the authors define “life” as one thing and “lifetime” (i.e. same as “years old” and “age”) as another. Looking at this question of whether or not Arphaxad was born on the ark from a math perspective ...


2

If I were you, I would not fret about such repetitiveness. Even the Psalms are filled with repetition, albeit in a poetic way. In one verse, the author says the same thing twice but with slightly different words. In the Psalms, I guess one purpose of doing this was for ease in memorization. Couplets can be easier to memorize than straight text. I remember ...


1

If you look at the exact wording it is all very simple. Gen 5:32 says that Noah begat Shem, Ham and Japheth at the age of 500 years (Hebrew: “the son of 500 years“). If he begat three sons in the same year he must have had at least two wives at that time, but let us leave that out of consideration. Let us assume that Noah was born on the first day of the ...


1

Genesis 7:6 And Noah was six hundred years old when the flood of waters was upon the earth. I don't know if anyone can prove the 2-year aspect or not. He could not have had three boys simultaneously. However Shem was the first-born... so it is reasonable to infer he was born (i.e. within 9 months) in Noah's 500th year. Thus Shem certainly could have ...


1

Noah’s age is not the only detail in the story that gets repeated. In fact many of the points of the story are repeated. The parallels between 7:6 and 7:11 may not be anything specific to Noah’s age. For example, the story repeats: The number of animals taken into the ark (7 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:2f, then 2 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:8f) ...


1

On the surface, this question sounds unanswerable. What do we know about Lamech? He lived 777 years, dying approximately 5 years before the flood. Methuselah, Lamech's father, died within a year of the flood (as late as in the flood, but this isn't known). Lamech's lifespan was unusually short (118 years shorter than anyone else whose age at death is ...


1

This is not precisely an answer to the question, but it is a requisite concept. (It also didn't fit into a comment well.) Margin of Error When Linking "When X was Y years" Statements When I say "error" here, I'm not referring to errors in the text, only inaccuracies in measuring lengths of time. Linking ages statements together has a necessarily large ...


1

James Jordan (who has done a lot of work on biblical chronology) asserts that the reasons are to reinforce the flood process as a new creation. He writes: As regards the Flood year itself, it began in the second month, which would be in the spring. We can make a good guess as to the various days of the year by taking note of the number of seven-day ...



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