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13

This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the ...


9

A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


8

Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


6

As a supplement to Frank Luke's answer, I add another way of thinking about it. The construction in English is very similar to the Greek: not X, but [instead] Y. (Wallace calls ἀλλὰ here a contrastive conjunction.1) For example, if I say "Put not your hand into boiling water, but use a spoon." The contrast is between: X= put your hand into boiling ...


5

The word translated "but" is alla. It is used to show the next clause is adverse to the first. Usually, the word is translated as "but." According to the NET translation team, it can be used in the sense of: 1) but 1a) nevertheless, notwithstanding 1b) an objection 1c) an exception 1d) a restriction 1e) nay, rather, yea, moreover 1f) forms a transition ...


4

Yes. Dr. C. Matthew McMahon writes that the belief that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is an idea that is not consistent with the manuscript evidence, and furthermore he draws the conclusion that believing that the four gospels were written in Hebrew is detrimental to knowing who God is, what he is like, and that Jesus is both God and man. See his ...


4

The Greek text of Acts 2:17 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα καὶ προφητεύσουσιν οἱ υἱοὶ ὑμῶν καὶ αἱ θυγατέρες ὑμῶν καὶ οἱ νεανίσκοι ὑμῶν ὁράσεις ὄψονται καὶ οἱ πρεσβύτεροι ὑμῶν ἐνυπνία ἐνυπνιασθήσονται The Greek phrase ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ...


4

Peter changes more than just the first phrase when he quotes Joel. Acts 2:17 And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams: (KJV) Joel 2:28 And it shall come to pass ...


3

In John 6:26 the Syriac Bible (Pshitta) has: ܐܡܝܢ ܐܡܝܢ ܐܡܪ ܐܢܐ ܠܟܘܢ , Eastern Syriac reading : ʼāmēn, ʼāmēn, ʼāmar nā lḵōn. However, ʼāmēn is not Aramaic; it is a Hebrew loan word.


3

Paul speaks of tongues throughout chapter 14, reviewing the entire chapter will prove useful. I've split my response into the answer in summary first and my work following it. Also, I've split my work into sections (1,2,3) and (A,B,C) which you can refer to when reading the answer. The Answer Tongues are mentioned along side prophecy many times and mention ...


3

BibleHub about 4/5 of the way down one page gives verses and says “(e) More than half of the direct quotations from the O.T. in the Epistles of St Paul are taken from the LXX. without material change…” “In other passages St Paul departs still further from the LXX, quoting freely...” BibleHub Quotations from the LXX Another entity, about 1/3 of the way ...


2

"Lead us not into temptation" is a "negative" admonishment. "Deliver us from evil" is an "affirmative" admonishment. In this regard they are contrasts. That appears to be why it is okay to connect them with "but."


2

The theologian was right, at least on this point. As far as we know*, Paul did only quote from the LXX, not from the Hebrew texts. This may have been because as a diaspora Jew he was not sufficiently familiar with the Hebrew language (in spite of Acts 22:3) or so that his gentile converts could read his sources in Greek. Christopher D. Stanley says in As it ...


2

The Greek word in both of those passages is "εὐσέβεια", or "reverence towards the gods or parents" (LSJ). Its primary root, "σέβομαι", connotes a sense of awe or dread of a greater power; the "εὐ" prefix appears to soften that to just the "good kinds" of awe: not fear and dread, but proper filial piety or "reverence". It is not necessarily always about God; ...


2

Just back up a verse: 21 In the Law it is written, "BY MEN OF STRANGE TONGUES AND BY THE LIPS OF STRANGERS I WILL SPEAK TO THIS PEOPLE, AND EVEN SO THEY WILL NOT LISTEN TO ME," says the Lord. That's a quote from Isaiah 28 (which is addressed to drunken, immature judges, priests and prophets): 11 For with mocking lips and a foreign tongue he will ...


2

If the Palestinian fisherman was actually quoting Joel 2:28, he could be expected to be quoting the Hebrew text, which come down to us (with unknown amendments, if any) in the Masoretic text. Perhaps Peter knew Greek, and we know that Acts 2:8 says he could now speak in every language, but we would still expect him not to quote the Septuagint (LXX), both ...


1

Jerusalem coming down from the heavens is actually mentioned a few verses earlier in Revelation 21:2: I saw the Holy City, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride beautifully dressed for her husband. It's meaning follows in the next verse: And I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God's dwelling ...


1

The text in Acts 2:17 is a quotation of the Septuagint version of Joel 2:28. (The Hebrew version of the latter is irrelevant for this question). If you look at the two side by side you cannot escape the conclusion that the author of Acts has intentionally altered the text. Compare: Acts 2:17 Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ ...


1

The "yoke" was in fact the law. To understand this we must examine the purpose, the requirements of, and the ultimate fulfillment of Mosaic Law. The Mosaic Law, given to Moses at Mt. Sinai, was a works based covenant entered into by God and His people the Children of Israel. The law was never intended for gentiles. It was given specifically to the ...


1

What is important to understand is that the gifts of the Holy Spirit operate in conjunction with the human spirit(pneuma). Paul is not suggesting he is merely praying with his own intellect, or his own 'spirit'; rather, when one operates in the gifts of the Spirit one must understand the Context one is operating in. Before we delve into Chapter 14, which ...


1

The oldest extant copies of the books of the New Testament are in Greek, and none of these use the Hebrew divine name ‘YHWH’. Because NT writers who quoted the Old Testament almost always cited a Greek translation rather than the original Hebrew text – 340 times out of 373, according to Archer and Chirichigno [1] – quotations of OT verses that include the ...


1

Let me suggest to you an alternative reading. Much of Jesus' teachings on the Sermon of the Mount represent a point of view quite similar to the rabbis (the Pharisees) of his generation as reflected in their teachings recorded later in the Mishna and the Tosefta and in the teachings of the Hebrew Scriptures. This point of view can be supported by Jesus' ...


1

There is no certain evidence that Q is earlier than Mark, although parts of it could be. Some scholars of the 'Q' hypothesis believe they have identified three distinct layers in Q, written over a period of time. The Didache, a community rule-manual of discipline on church order, is widely regarded as having existed, at least in its earliest form, earlier ...


1

In order to explain how Gabriel addressed Mary, it seems a few words along with “κεχαριτωμένη” need to be considered. Seriously, regarding this being “very high status”, “more common word”, etc.; it’s hard to believe two people could give you the same answer to that specific question. Christians of various beliefs and Bibles have considerably different ...


1

This is controversial subject you're inquiring into. You must know that there seems to exist a strong bias among Western scholars toward proving that original texts of New Testament were written in Greek. This bias seems to be rooted partially in tradition of Catholic and Orthodox Churches and is "inherited" by Protestants. Because of that everything NOT ...



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