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It seems that most of the commentaries take "at home" to mean Peter's home from Mark 1:29, which seems to have functioned as the base for Jesus' ministry in Capernaum. While both follow this majority opinion, J. Marcus allows that "en oikō̧" could simply mean "in a house" and R. Stein states the possibility that it is Jesus' own home. However, given that the ...


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The possibility of confusion seems slight. Everywhere that Luke refers to James son of Zebedee he is mentioned alongside his brother John (Luke 5:10, 6:14, 8:51, 8:54; Acts 1:13, 12:2). Richard Pervo (Hermeneia) also notes that: "Traditions about the martyrdom of the sons of Zebedee are relatively early."1 This is seen, for example, in Mark 10:39. By the ...


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2 Tim 3:16 The question assumes that when Paul wrote 2 Tim 3:16 he was only referring to the Old Testament scriptures and whilst that is a view commonly presented it seems to ignore that Paul considered Luke's gospel to be scripture as well, consider 1 Tim 5:18: 1 Timothy 5:18 For the Scripture says, "You shall not muzzle an ox while it treads out the ...


2

In a word, No. The oldest extant copies of the books of the New Testament are in Greek, and none of these use the Hebrew divine name ‘YHWH’. Because NT writers who quoted the Old Testament almost always cited a Greek translation rather than the original Hebrew text – 340 times out of 373, according to Archer and Chirichigno [1] – quotations of OT verses ...


2

The the closest event to the death of Jesus recorded in scripture is Nehemiah's second return to Jerusalem. The International Standard Bible Encyclopedia states: On the other hand, the abuses which Malachi attacked correspond so exactly with those which Nehemiah found on his 2nd visit to Jerusalem in 432 BC (Nehemiah 13:7) that it seems reasonably ...


1

The New Testament gospels were not written to be historical books. Subsequent scribes did not in general attempt to ensure changes were not introduced.. Starting with Mark's Gospel, Rhoads, Joanna Dewey and Donald Michie say in Mark as Story (third ed, page 5) Mark should be read as story rather than as history. They say (page 1), the composer of this ...


1

Faber Stapulensis (Lefevre d'Etaples) and Bullinger, in their respective commentaries, both point out the discrepancy. Bullinger goes into some detail and concludes that there must have been two censuses. Calvin likely read both, but goes into greater detail than either.



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