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Peter changes more than just the first phrase when he quotes Joel. Acts 2:17 And it shall come to pass in the last days, saith God, I will pour out of my Spirit upon all flesh: and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams: (KJV) Joel 2:28 And it shall come to pass ...


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The Greek text of Acts 2:17 according to the Textus Receptus (Estienne, 1550) states, Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ πνεύματός μου ἐπὶ πᾶσαν σάρκα καὶ προφητεύσουσιν οἱ υἱοὶ ὑμῶν καὶ αἱ θυγατέρες ὑμῶν καὶ οἱ νεανίσκοι ὑμῶν ὁράσεις ὄψονται καὶ οἱ πρεσβύτεροι ὑμῶν ἐνυπνία ἐνυπνιασθήσονται The Greek phrase ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ...


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BibleHub about 4/5 of the way down one page gives verses and says “(e) More than half of the direct quotations from the O.T. in the Epistles of St Paul are taken from the LXX. without material change…” “In other passages St Paul departs still further from the LXX, quoting freely...” BibleHub Quotations from the LXX Another entity, about 1/3 of the way ...


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If the Palestinian fisherman was actually quoting Joel 2:28, he could be expected to be quoting the Hebrew text, which come down to us (with unknown amendments, if any) in the Masoretic text. Perhaps Peter knew Greek, and we know that Acts 2:8 says he could now speak in every language, but we would still expect him not to quote the Septuagint (LXX), both ...


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The text in Acts 2:17 is a quotation of the Septuagint version of Joel 2:28. (The Hebrew version of the latter is irrelevant for this question). If you look at the two side by side you cannot escape the conclusion that the author of Acts has intentionally altered the text. Compare: Acts 2:17 Καὶ ἔσται ἐν ταῖς ἐσχάταις ἡμέραις λέγει ὁ θεός ἐκχεῶ ἀπὸ τοῦ ...


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There is no certain evidence that Q is earlier than Mark, although parts of it could be. Some scholars of the 'Q' hypothesis believe they have identified three distinct layers in Q, written over a period of time. The Didache, a community rule-manual of discipline on church order, is widely regarded as having existed, at least in its earliest form, earlier ...



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