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No, traditional English translations render שֵׁם־יְהוָה correctly as a phrase: e.g. “Look! The name of Yahweh comes from afar ...” (LEB). Though name and YHWH are linked in the Masoretic text by a maqqef or 'Hebrew hyphen', this indicates to speakers that the second word is accented, not the first. It’s a function of pronunciation, not meaning. The ...


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Relevant Basics About Translation All translation involves interpretation: The source word will potentially have a number of meanings associated to it, some meanings may be similar but nuanced (small vs. miniature), others may be completely different (the bark of a dog vs. the bark of a tree). This is an interpretive step, which then must have a word ...


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Of the several dozen English translations offered at the Bible Study Tools link, the three that include the Hebrew word Elyon are all publications of Messianic Judaism. They are not English translations of the Hebrew text but paraphrases of English versions with some words translated back into Hebrew (or Yiddish). The two translators who added the ‘ha’ ...


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Question Restatement: When translating from Hebrew to English, why is "The", as a definite article, injected into translations, when the definite article, "The/ה", is not present in the original text? Answer: (A.) There simply is no textual basis to infer that "Elyon" referred to any other "god", and no passages using this word are ambigious--in the ...



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