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The NWT translation rests on two quirks of Greek. Ὁ θρόνος σου ὁ θεὸς εἰς τὸν αἰῶνα τοῦ αἰῶνος, ...(SBLGNT) the throne of you the God into the age of the age, ...(my nearly word-for-word translation) First, the nominative case and the vocative case often share the same forms. So the original passage has two occurrences of the word form "ὁ" ("the") ...


4

Gesenius lexicon for Strong's 3050 has a slightly expanded explanation. There either יַהֲַוֹה or יַהְַוֶה is allowed to be an earlier pronounciation of YHWH, and the form Yah is explained by apocope to יָהוּ and then by omission of the unaccented וּ to the final יָהּ. As a further evidence, Gesenius points that "these forms are used promiscuously" (sic) at ...


-3

I'm willing to bet this was shortened in the same way and for the same reason that we shorten "Kimberly" to "Kim" and other similar names. Remember, the Psalms were songs. This was probably shortened to "Yah" from "Yahweh" so that a rhyme could be preserved or in order to accommodate the musical structure that went with this verse. I'll bet you don't see ...


0

The name of the Lord is both singular in as much as it pertains to God, and collective, in as much as it refers to God as Father, God the Word (Son of God as Scripture refers to Him), or God as Spirit. God told Moses, in regard to His name: 13 Then Moses said to God, "Indeed, when I come to the children of Israel and say to them, 'The God of your ...


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Warning: This is meat, and some Christians still need milk. I ask for Patience and Forgiveness while understanding this message. However simply because some, because of disbelief may not even read all of this. Those that can continue in its entirety in fullness of understanding, I tell you whatever is doubtful will become clear, so I ask that errors that you ...


1

The Bible has a long history of using plurality and singularity interchangeably. You have already keyed in on one verse, but another is Deuteronomy 6:4. "Sh'ma Yisrael, Yahweh Eloheinu, Yahweh Echad" or translated - "Hear, O Israel, the LORD is our God, the LORD is One! ". In Elohenu and it's root Elohim are plural in form. As such, most modern Christian ...


3

Jesus spoke primarily Aramaic followed by Hebrew and Greek. Since most of the new testament was written in greek, you will probably never find it recorded that Jesus said "YHWH" in scriptures. This doesn't mean he didn't say it, it's just a translation thing. Furthermore, it was Hebrew tradition to interpose the name Adonai inside of "YHWH" which is ...


6

No. The tetragrammaton was not used in Jesus' time. Faithful Jews would avoid saying it so as to not transgress the third commandment. The most common circumlocution was "Lord" (Andonai in Hebrew or Kurios in Greek), though he might also be referred to simply as "Heaven." In answer to Jesus using El from the cross. El is the common word for God from all ...


4

While @H3br3wHamm3r81 has provided a fine answer to this question, there is one more wrinkle that can be added for the sake of completeness. We know of a tradition of supplying the Tetragram (Y-H-W-H), HaShem, the name of God, in special characters from the Dead Sea Scrolls. One of the clearest places to see this is in the Psalms scroll from Cave 11: Or, ...


-3

Three consonants make a Hebrew word, yes it is tri-consonantal, less than three consonants, it's not Hebrew, probably Proto-Canaanite. It must start with a consonant, then a vowel (normally). You cannot have two vowels in a row, never happens. For 600 years there were no vowels until the 9th century BC and 586 BC and of course the nikkud developed by the ...



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