Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

I think that the term "Red Sea" is a mis-translation of the term "Reed Sea". This was a small body of water that was north of the usually proposed route that Moses took. It no longer exists as a result of the creation of the Suez Canal. It was a shallow boggy area. It does not strain ones credulity nearly as much to imagine the events of the crossing as ...


4

Of course, אֱלֹהִים ʾĕlōhîm has a much broader semantic range than YHWH, as implied by the way the question is framed. They are by no means synonymous. The entry in Brown-Driver-Briggs lists a number of references where ʾĕlōhîm is used of one who stands in God's place (as HALOT also has it): Some references are regularly cited together here, especially ...


0

ṭōḇ means “good”, as Gesenius or any other dictionary will tell you. It is part of the core vocabulary of Hebrew. Depending on the context you can also render it as “good looking”, “virtuous” or whatever, but the basic meaning is perfectly clear. This problem here is not linguistic, but it is about understanding the story, which seems to imply that if Moses ...


3

After doing some research, it seems that the adjective טוֹב (tov) is sometimes used in reference to people in a manner referring other than to a personality trait (i.e., "kind"). For example, in Gen. 6:2, it is written, And the sons of God saw the daughters of men, that that they were [טֹבֹת], and they took wives for themselves, whomever they chose. ...


0

Interesting question. Rashi gives us unrelated answers to each question. First, citing a midrash contained in the Babylonian Talmud, Sotah 12a, and in Exodus Rabbah 1:20, a miracle occurred when Moses was born and that the house was suddenly filled with light. Second, citing the same sources, Rashi explains that the Egyptians would observe women and count ...


4

Under Jewish law he did not commit murder. The Egyptian was in Talmudic parlance a rodef -- a pursuer; i.e. one who was trying to kill another person or persons. In such instances, the pursued have the right to self-defense. Rava coined the , and third-parties have the right to kill the pursuer. Rava coined the famous Talmudic dictum (Babyl. Talmud, ...



Top 50 recent answers are included