Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

19

The (relatively) small amount of bronze needed to make that serpent/snake (or נְחַשׁ נְחֹשֶׁת nĕḥaš nĕḥōšet) in the story of Num 21:4-9,1 even if it was as large as the monument now on Mount Nebo in Jordan,... ...would still have been quite small compared to the amount of bronze (let alone silver and gold) needed to make the utensils required for the ...


5

Of course, אֱלֹהִים ʾĕlōhîm has a much broader semantic range than YHWH, as implied by the way the question is framed. They are by no means synonymous. The entry in Brown-Driver-Briggs lists a number of references where ʾĕlōhîm is used of one who stands in God's place (as HALOT also has it): Some references are regularly cited together here, especially ...


4

Under Jewish law he did not commit murder. The Egyptian was in Talmudic parlance a rodef -- a pursuer; i.e. one who was trying to kill another person or persons. In such instances, the pursued have the right to self-defense. Rava coined the , and third-parties have the right to kill the pursuer. Rava coined the famous Talmudic dictum (Babyl. Talmud, ...


4

Psalm 90 is unique in that it is the only psalm that has a superscription that identifies it as having been written by Moses. Mark S. Smith says in 'Taking Inspiration', published in Psalms and Practice (edited by Stephen Breck Reid), page 245, that the scholarly consensus is that the superscriptions we see on many of the psalms are prose additions to the ...


4

It is not known for certain whether the Cushite woman and Zipporah are one and the same. Some Rabbinic commentators, including Rashi, point out that this wife is mentioned nowhere else in the Torah. Therefore, the Cushite woman from Numbers 12:1 must be referring to Zipporah. Other commentators cite the Chronicles of Moses, which is an early Midrashic ...


3

The word translated 'heads' in the KJV is רֹאשׁ and like most words it has a wide semantic range, it can mean 'head' as in a part of the body, but it can also refer to 'a head' as in a leader or chief (among other things), see for example: Exodus 6:14 These are the heads of their fathers' houses: The sons of Reuben, the firstborn of Israel, were ...


3

After doing some research, it seems that the adjective טוֹב (tov) is sometimes used in reference to people in a manner referring other than to a personality trait (i.e., "kind"). For example, in Gen. 6:2, it is written, And the sons of God saw the daughters of men, that that they were [טֹבֹת], and they took wives for themselves, whomever they chose. ...


2

While not stated directly, the Sabbath is evidence that holy ground first occurred during creation. The Sabbath is holy to God's people and it is holy to the LORD: And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak also to the children of Israel, saying: ‘Surely My Sabbaths you shall keep, for it is a sign between Me and you throughout your generations, that ...


2

There is no way to know for certain, but most likely Aaron was old enough that Pharaoh's command, “Every son that is born to the Hebrews you shall cast into the Nile..." (Ex. 1:22), did not come into effect until after Aaron's birth. In Exodus 7:7 we find out that Aaron is 3 years older than Moses, "Now Moses was eighty years old, and Aaron eighty-three ...


2

I agree with the earlier response that G-d was not standing with the angel in the burning bush. A common way by which G-d communicates with the Patriarchs in Genesis and Exodus is through an angel. As the Hebrew word מַלְאָךְ can mean either "angel" or "messenger," it is clear even in antiquity that G-d communicated through angels. A few examples will ...


2

The angel appears in the bush alone, we are told nothing of God being there. Angels appear to many in scripture without the presence of fire, so it seems unnecessary to think the bush is burning because if the angel, but rather it is an additional sign to Moses that it burned without being consumed. Moses turning his face from the angel is not unusual ...


2

There is one single meaning in both the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and New Testament: the cloud represents the Divine Presence. The Divine Presence corresponds to the Spirit, by whom the believer arrives to divine rest through the water. The 19th Century Bible scholar Hermann Olshausen (1825) made the following comment in this regard (with emphasis added): ...


2

The fact that the commandments finish with the people complaining to Moses implies he has not yet gone back up? So do I understand correctly, the ten commandments are delivered by Yahweh on the mountain, while Moses is still at the bottom of the mountain? Where is "between the LORD and you[the people]"? First let's address the second question ...


1

As to where Moses was during the deliverance of the commandments, we read that God told Moses to go down and come back up in Exo 19:24 "And the LORD said to him, "Go down, and come up bringing Aaron with you." So it would stand to reason that Moses did indeed go back up for the commandment portion of the delivering of Law by God as there would be no reason ...


1

The general rules for the treatment of human captives were laid out in Deut.20:10-17a: When you march up to attack a city [far from the ‘promised land’], make its people an offer of peace. If they accept and open their gates, all the people in it shall be subject to forced labor and shall work for you. If they refuse to make peace and they ...


1

Moses did the same thing that Nadab and Abihu did in Leviticus 10, and the same thing that Saul did in 1 Samuel 15--almost what God said but not quite. God told Moses to speak to the rock and water would come out. Moses strikes the rock. As a result he is not allowed to go into the Promised Land. God gave specific instructions as to how priests were to ...


1

The Angel of the Lord(AOTL) or the Angel of God, is distinct from other angels in the bible and should not be confused with an a ordinary angel". In the Old testament the AOTL has the divine authority to forgive "transgressions",(Exodus 23:21); receive worship (Joshua 5:14)(Gen 18:2; Num 22:31) bless generations (Gen 22:18);create life (Genesis ...


1

The reason God sought to kill 'him' The answer to the question is found in the pericope itself. Ex 4:24-26 "And it came to pass on the way, at the encampment, that the LORD met him and sought to kill him. Then Zipporah took a sharp stone and cut off the foreskin of her son and cast it at Moses ' feet, and said, "Surely you are a husband of blood to me!" ...


1

Crucial pieces in this puzzle that I believe you are missing, scripture states many times that the Children of Israel walked in the MIDST OF THE SEA in Exodus 14 v 22, and God repeats this virtually word by word, 7 verses later in Chapter 14 v 29 Yes, congealed water is ice.... Why can so many not see the reality of what is said so plainly in scripture? Ice ...


1

I think that the term "Red Sea" is a mis-translation of the term "Reed Sea". This was a small body of water that was north of the usually proposed route that Moses took. It no longer exists as a result of the creation of the Suez Canal. It was a shallow boggy area. It does not strain ones credulity nearly as much to imagine the events of the crossing as ...


1

While it is unclear whether a nomadic people would have the means to mine, smelt, and smith metals sufficient to the needs mentioned in Exodus and Numbers, the Israelites may have accessed such technology and materials through their Midian and Kenite relations who lived nearby. Both groups were known for their mining and metalworking skills.[1] The ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible