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15

Sticking just to the text: In the earlier passage, God commanded Moshe to strike the rock and he obeyed. In the present passage, God commanded Moshe to speak and he struck instead. (It's been 39 years, so "that's what we did last time" probably doesn't apply.) Why is this a problem? Look at what Moshe said: shall we bring water for you out of this ...


13

I have always assumed that Aaron was born before this decree was made. (He's three years older.) The text only tells us that Pharaoh made the decree and Moses was born (and his mother hid him etc). If Aaron had been born under the decree then I would expect the text to be different from what it is, but we are left to reason from the absence of information ...


12

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his ...


12

I believe your first option is the best but with a little modification. Moses originally had an Egyptian name that sounded almost exactly like a Hebrew name. The pun involved in the name is elaborate and crosses languages. Names like Tutmose, Ramose, Amenmose are well attested from Egypt. The addition of -mose makes it "born of Amen," "child of Tut," or ...


9

Scholars have been raising doubts about Moses' authorship since the mid-1600s, when Thomas Hobbes noted that certain passages in the five books of the Torah seemed to indicate they had been added by a later writer. Genesis 12:6, "At that time the Canaanites were in the land." And they still were in Moses' time. Numbers 21:14, referring to "the Book of the ...


9

Location: The location of Mount Horeb, which most understand to be the same as Mount Sinai (see Deut 4:10, 4:15, etc), is unclear. There are many traditions about the location of Mount Sinai, some of which are probably more hospitable than others. The location offered by Open Bible is but one of many. Sheep: None of the candidate locations appears to be ...


6

Technically, Deuteronomy is written in third person. The first five verses are in third person, ending with "Moses began to expound this law, saying:" Moses speaks from chapter 2 through chapter 30, and the main narration begins again with chapter 31 with occasional dialogue Moses recites a poem/song in chapter 32:1-43, and then the narration begins again ...


5

There are many parallels in the Revelation found in the Old Testament (OT). The Song of Moses and the Song of the Lamb (cf. Ex. 15 and Rev. 15:1-3) is one of the most striking examples. Although the Book of Revelation does not quote the OT verbatim, it alludes to it over 550 times*. What we find in Rev. 15, is the Apostle John alluding to the post-Exodus ...


5

No, it wasn't a necessary thing to do (in addition to the actual circumcision) because the LORD had not commanded Zipporah to do it. The action and her words ("You [Moses] are a bridegroom of blood to me") certainly had a symbolic meaning, though that meaning, however, may or may not have been derived from "an ancient marital relationship formula recalling ...


5

P.J. Wiseman posits the theory that the 'toledoth' indicates authors who were eyewitnesses to the events mentioned in Genesis. This is based on the pattern of writing found on ancient Babylonian tablets predating Abraham where the word translated 'generations of' is used to indicate the ownership or authorship of the clay tablet. He suggests that the ...


4

What Moses did wrong is exactly what the Hebrews did wrong when they sent the spies and they believed the pesimistic report given by the spies. In both cases, G-d told them that they could do something that in any other circumstance would be considered a miracle . . . and they didn't believe Him. Consider these facts. At Exodus 6:8 G-d promises to the ...


4

Could be retranslated as "bridegroom of blood" ("bloody bridegroom" could be an attempt to smooth the english genitive) which could just be a lament about the fact that Zipporah's son almost died because Moses had failed in his responsibility. Conversationally, I have heard people wonder if she disagreed with circumcision. I don't think so, given her ...


4

This question is interesting in its own right, but all the more so in light of John's pronouncement in Matthew 3:9 that God is able from stones to raise up children for Abraham. One way we might understand the argument in Exodus 32 is to note that Moses does not ask God to remember his promise so much as to remember his servants to whom he made the promise. ...


4

Might be 32:11 rather than 34:11. Classical Hebrew does not include consistency of person or voice in the same way that modern English does. Not only is the language different, the idiom is different. You can see this all over the Psalms - what appear to us to be jarring changes of person, voice and subject within a verse or two. Ex 32:11 sounds fine to me, ...


4

The Tetragrammaton, or "YHWH" which is often pronounced "Yahweh" or "Jehovah", is the proper name of the God of the Bible. The word "Elohim" or any variation thereof ("El", "Eloh", "Elah".. etc) is a title which means simply "God" or more precisely, "Mighty Ones" (in the case of "Elohim", or in the singular for all the others) and not a proper name. Just as ...


3

From Constable's "Notes" in the NET Bible: The statement of Moses’ humility (v. 3) was not a boastful claim by the writer but an inspired statement of fact. We need not conclude that another writer added it later since it is essential to the argument of this passage. That another writer added it later is a distinct possibility, however. One writer ...


3

So, in Exodus 34:33, did Moshe speak to the Israelites with a veil upon his face or without a veil upon his face? I think the short answer is "yes".* The longer answer follows. * That is: yes Moshe spoke with a veil (eventually); and yes, Moshe spoke without a veil (in the instance of Ex 34:33, etc.). See the end of this answer for a small excursus ...


3

The children of Moab comprised a smaller tribe within the larger federation of tribes referred to as Midianites, or simply Midian. Earlier in the book of Numbers, we learn that the Israelites "began to play the harlot with the daughters of Moab" (25:1). Moreover, the Israelites attended the sacrifices of the Moabites, they ate among the Moabites (perhaps ...


3

This is intended to compliment the WilbertEric's answer above, with which I entirely concur. I present this because there seems to be some discrepancy as to what the song of Moses is which would entirely bear upon ones interpretation of this text. Two songs are attributed to Moses in the OT: The first is a song of victory recorded in Exodus 15:1-20* The ...


2

One reason for the redundancy is the unfaithfulness of the people. What we continually see in Exodus through Deuteronomy (interesting, huh, a second giving of the law) is that the people are incredibly unfaithful to God. There unfaithfulness is very repetitious; therefore God is repetitious in his commands. Plain and simple, they never listened the first ...


2

You are correct in noting that His promises to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob could have been fulfilled through Moses. However, consider verses 11-12. Moses points to two aspects of the Exodus that would be affected by a rejection of Israel: God demonstrated His mighty power in bringing out the Israelites from Egypt. This would effectively be wasted effort on ...


2

In v32, after he has been down to witness the sin and returned, Moshe tells God "if you will not forgive them, wipe me out too". Perhaps he had this in mind earlier; he'd already resolved that he wouldn't consent to being the new Avraham if the Israelites were not found worthy to continue? Please note: This answer was written for a neutral, academic ...


2

The etymology given for his name is "Min ha-mayim mashitehu". Which goes along with the active verb: moshet, or the passite constructure mashut, or whatever construction you want with the three consonsants "M""Sh" and "T". The "T" is missing, so it's not Hebrew, and this is clearly made up etymology justifying the name in hindsight, as most of the Hebrew ...


2

Deutoronomy or Debarim (The Words) is, what Moses spoke to Israel towards the end of their travels through the wildernis and deserts of Arabia, and it were his final words to them before he died and before they entered the land. So much of it is direct speech it would have been unnatural, had he spoken of himself in third person after all these (almost 40 ...


2

The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


2

הוֹשֵׁעַ means "saves", while יְהוֹשֻׁעַ means "God saves". Rashi explains: And Moses called Hoshea…: He prayed on his behalf, “May God save you from the counsel of the spies.” [The name יְהוֹשֻׁעַ is a compounded form of יָהּ יוֹשִׁיעֲךָ, May God save you.]- [Sotah 34b] Sotah 34b (in the Babylonian talmud) relates the following (Soncino translation): ...


2

Not entirely sure that there is just one, or even two answers to this conundrum. I have pondered this on many occasions and done some research as well. Some of the answers I have come across are: Anger. Moses got angry and his anger lead him to not follow his instructions properly so I suppose you could say anger resulting in disobedience...? Pride. He ...


1

Obviously, it could only have at best been written by Joshua. Moses received the Torah, and perhaps a confirmation of the oral and written history that had pervaded/preceded the culture of Israel. Then someone else would have to write it down. Otherwise, the ending passage of Deuteronomy was also written by Moses? How could a dead Moses have written his ...


1

The most common times chosen for the Exodus are sometime between 2670 BCE and 1759 BCE or http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Egyptian_pyramids#Construction_dates or during the Reign of Ahmose I who ruled 1539–1514 BCE or Amenhotep II who ruled 1427–1401 BC or 1427–1397 BC. Most scholars believe that it was one of the Pharaohs of the 18th Dynasty The thinking ...


1

The significance of the various uses of the names Yahweh and Elohim can be better understood when we realise that often when the author uses the name Yahweh, the focus is on Judah, and whenever he uses the name Elohim, the focus tends to be on the northern kingdom of Israel. When the author uses the name Yahweh, he is speaking of an anthropomorphic God with ...



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