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19

The (relatively) small amount of bronze needed to make that serpent/snake (or נְחַשׁ נְחֹשֶׁת nĕḥaš nĕḥōšet) in the story of Num 21:4-9,1 even if it was as large as the monument now on Mount Nebo in Jordan,... ...would still have been quite small compared to the amount of bronze (let alone silver and gold) needed to make the utensils required for the ...


15

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his ...


14

I believe your first option is the best but with a little modification. Moses originally had an Egyptian name that sounded almost exactly like a Hebrew name. The pun involved in the name is elaborate and crosses languages. Names like Tutmose, Ramose, Amenmose are well attested from Egypt. The addition of -mose makes it "born of Amen," "child of Tut," or "...


11

Scholars have been raising doubts about Moses' authorship since the mid-1600s, when Thomas Hobbes noted that certain passages in the five books of the Torah seemed to indicate they had been added by a later writer. Genesis 12:6, "At that time the Canaanites were in the land." And they still were in Moses' time. Deuteronomy 34, the account of Moses' death, ...


10

Might be 32:11 rather than 34:11. Classical Hebrew does not include consistency of person or voice in the same way that modern English does. Not only is the language different, the idiom is different. You can see this all over the Psalms - what appear to us to be jarring changes of person, voice and subject within a verse or two. Ex 32:11 sounds fine to me, ...


6

Technically, Deuteronomy is written in third person. The first five verses are in third person, ending with "Moses began to expound this law, saying:" Moses speaks from chapter 2 through chapter 30, and the main narration begins again with chapter 31 with occasional dialogue Moses recites a poem/song in chapter 32:1-43, and then the narration begins again ...


5

The Tetragrammaton, or "YHWH" which is often pronounced "Yahweh" or "Jehovah", is the proper name of the God of the Bible. The word "Elohim" or any variation thereof ("El", "Eloh", "Elah".. etc) is a title which means simply "God" or more precisely, "Mighty Ones" (in the case of "Elohim", or in the singular for all the others) and not a proper name. Just as ...


5

This question is interesting in its own right, but all the more so in light of John's pronouncement in Matthew 3:9 that God is able from stones to raise up children for Abraham. One way we might understand the argument in Exodus 32 is to note that Moses does not ask God to remember his promise so much as to remember his servants to whom he made the promise. ...


5

There are many parallels in the Revelation found in the Old Testament (OT). The Song of Moses and the Song of the Lamb (cf. Ex. 15 and Rev. 15:1-3) is one of the most striking examples. Although the Book of Revelation does not quote the OT verbatim, it alludes to it over 550 times*. What we find in Rev. 15, is the Apostle John alluding to the post-Exodus ...


5

Of course, אֱלֹהִים ʾĕlōhîm has a much broader semantic range than YHWH, as implied by the way the question is framed. They are by no means synonymous. The entry in Brown-Driver-Briggs lists a number of references where ʾĕlōhîm is used of one who stands in God's place (as HALOT also has it): Some references are regularly cited together here, especially ...


5

The New Bible Dictionary states: For centuries both Judaism and Christianity accepted without question the biblical tradition that Moses wrote the Pentateuch. Ben-Sira (Ecclus. 24:23), Philo (Life of Moses 3. 39), Josephus (Ant. 4.326), the Mishnah (Pirqê Abôth 1. 1), and the Talmud (Baba Bathra 14b) are unanimous in their acceptance of the ...


4

While there is nothing explicit given regarding the change, the significance appears to lie in the meanings themselves. However, this topic is possibly the most important onomastic study of all time. No exaggeration. Numbers 13:16 reads: “אֵלֶּה שְׁמֹות הָאֲנָשִׁים אֲשֶׁר־שָׁלַח מֹשֶׁה לָתוְּר אֶת־הָאָרֶץ וַיִּקְרָא מֹשֶׁה לְהֹושֵׁעַ בִּנ־נוְּן יְהֹושֻׁעַ” First, we ...


4

The aggadic interpretation shared by many Jewish commentators is that the basis for the name change is that Moses prayed for Joshua. Indeed Rashi explains that he prays he be saved from the counsel of the spies. Why he didn't pray for Caleb as well is a question many commentators who take this line have great difficulty understanding (see the Kli Yakar). ...


4

What Moses did wrong is exactly what the Hebrews did wrong when they sent the spies and they believed the pesimistic report given by the spies. In both cases, G-d told them that they could do something that in any other circumstance would be considered a miracle . . . and they didn't believe Him. Consider these facts. At Exodus 6:8 G-d promises to the ...


4

So, in Exodus 34:33, did Moshe speak to the Israelites with a veil upon his face or without a veil upon his face? I think the short answer is "yes".* The longer answer follows. * That is: yes Moshe spoke with a veil (eventually); and yes, Moshe spoke without a veil (in the instance of Ex 34:33, etc.). See the end of this answer for a small excursus ...


4

Under Jewish law he did not commit murder. The Egyptian was in Talmudic parlance a rodef -- a pursuer; i.e. one who was trying to kill another person or persons. In such instances, the pursued have the right to self-defense. Rava coined the , and third-parties have the right to kill the pursuer. Rava coined the famous Talmudic dictum (Babyl. Talmud, ...


4

It is not known for certain whether the Cushite woman and Zipporah are one and the same. Some Rabbinic commentators, including Rashi, point out that this wife is mentioned nowhere else in the Torah. Therefore, the Cushite woman from Numbers 12:1 must be referring to Zipporah. Other commentators cite the Chronicles of Moses, which is an early Midrashic ...


4

Psalm 90 is unique in that it is the only psalm that has a superscription that identifies it as having been written by Moses. Mark S. Smith says in 'Taking Inspiration', published in Psalms and Practice (edited by Stephen Breck Reid), page 245, that the scholarly consensus is that the superscriptions we see on many of the psalms are prose additions to the ...


4

Although the Hebrew article is frequently used in a manner that is similar to the English definite article, there are certain contexts where this parallel breaks down. One such case when the Hebrew definite may correspond to an English indefinite is summarized by Waltke and O'Connor:1 The article may also mark nouns definite in the imagination, ...


3

P.J. Wiseman posits the theory that the 'toledoth' indicates authors who were eyewitnesses to the events mentioned in Genesis. This is based on the pattern of writing found on ancient Babylonian tablets predating Abraham where the word translated 'generations of' is used to indicate the ownership or authorship of the clay tablet. He suggests that the ...


3

Could be retranslated as "bridegroom of blood" ("bloody bridegroom" could be an attempt to smooth the english genitive) which could just be a lament about the fact that Zipporah's son almost died because Moses had failed in his responsibility. Conversationally, I have heard people wonder if she disagreed with circumcision. I don't think so, given her father'...


3

You are correct in noting that His promises to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob could have been fulfilled through Moses. However, consider verses 11-12. Moses points to two aspects of the Exodus that would be affected by a rejection of Israel: God demonstrated His mighty power in bringing out the Israelites from Egypt. This would effectively be wasted effort on ...


3

After doing some research, it seems that the adjective טוֹב (tov) is sometimes used in reference to people in a manner referring other than to a personality trait (i.e., "kind"). For example, in Gen. 6:2, it is written, And the sons of God saw the daughters of men, that that they were [טֹבֹת], and they took wives for themselves, whomever they chose. ...


3

The word translated 'heads' in the KJV is רֹאשׁ and like most words it has a wide semantic range, it can mean 'head' as in a part of the body, but it can also refer to 'a head' as in a leader or chief (among other things), see for example: Exodus 6:14 These are the heads of their fathers' houses: The sons of Reuben, the firstborn of Israel, were Hanoch,...


3

It was not uncommon for people in the Bible to go under multiple monikers. Abram was also known as Abrham (Gen 17:5), Sarah was also known as Sarai (Genesis 17:15), Jacob was also known as Israel (Genesis 35:10) and so forth. This simply appears to be another one of those instances. Names in Hebrew culture often had significance and names were often ...


3

Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...



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