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44

If it did refer to something that was merely difficult, the immediate reaction of the disciples would be incomprehensible: 26And they were exceedingly astonished, and said to him, "Then who can be saved?"   ESV As would Jesus' response: 27Jesus looked at them and said, "With man it is impossible, but not with God. For all things are ...


37

The idea of the "eye of the needle" being a gate apparently had its origins in the Middle Ages. From The Straight Dope: Next, the history and archaeology. The notion your Baptist friend has picked up apparently comes from a single ninth-century commentary which asserts that in first-century Jerusalem there was a gate called the Needle's Eye which a ...


11

I found out that "camel" in Aramaic can mean "thick rope made out of camel-hair". This seems like a natural interpretation to me, because the rich man is like a coarse rope, and the entrance to the kingdom of heaven is like a small needle, and the coarse rope will not pass. It makes the parallel more explicit, and it is more eloquent (although less ...


9

The letter gimel has the meaning of a 'rich man chasing after a poor man' (1) and camel is gamal, an obvious pun. The rich young ruler had just chased after Jesus (a poor man) and played a game of threading the needle. This is where the law is defined by the individual so that he finds himself narrowly avoiding a violation of the law in his own eyes. ...


7

Jesus always uses the mustard seed to represent something small. The mustard seed was popularly known to be the smallest of all seeds.1 Of course, it also has the property of being a seed (i.e. it germinates), but that part of the metaphor is not unique to being a mustard seed. There is no record of Jesus using any other of the mustard seed's unique ...


5

No. Yes, mustard seeds are small, but that isn't their only important property. Jesus doesn't say "If you had faith like a tiny grain of sand", or "The kingdom of heaven is like something really small". He uses the image of a tiny speck of dust, a "mote" when describing something really tiny in another passage, so it isn't like the mustard seed is the only ...


4

As you point out, the word φέρω can mean either "carry" or "bear". I think the traditional understanding as "bear" is well supported. I will address the contextual issues that have led you to wonder if it might not mean “bear" in the sense of “produce." Objection #1 OP: Branches are normally associated with trees not vines. True. However, κλήματα are ...


3

The beauty of a young woman comes to us through our eyes, whereby we might be drawn into sin and adultery. Therefore, possibly making a covenant with our eyes is just a poetic way of saying: ‘I have agreed within myself, swore to myself and all the prime members involved, that I will not lustfully gaze after a maiden.’ One might say 'I made a covenant with ...


3

The Hebrew word translated as "beauty" is "hod", which would be better translated as "glory" or "majesty". Same word used in Psalms 96:6 (beginning of verse), Psalms 104:1, Psalms 111:3, Isaiah 30:30, Job 40:10, I Chron 29:11 and many other places. Remember, we were farmers then, and to a farmer, even a corn stalk can be "glorious". The olive has the ...


2

I would first like to offer one passage in the New Testament that effectively answers both the issue of intermarriage between Israel and Gentiles, as well as the state of the Torah of Moshe. In Ephesians 2:14-16, the apostle Paulos wrote, 14 For he is our peace, who made both, one, and destroyed the middle-wall of the fence, 15 when he abolished the ...


2

To answer the first part of your question, the foundations and pillars of the earth were thought to be distinct from the earth itself. These were the structure which actually held up the earth. It may be helpful to visualize the Ancient Middle Eastern conception of cosmology to better understand:



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