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The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


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The counterpoint to Micah Gafford's answer (literal hermeneutics) just fell in my lap (from a June 28th interview with Horia-Roman Patapievici, renowned Romanian physicist and essayist; original in Romanian, English translation below): The secularization of Europe is not evil, because secularization is a fundamental fact of Christianity, namely, ...


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Let's read back a bit in Matthew 16 starting at verse 13(ESV): 13 Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” 14 And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” 15 He said to them, “But who do you say ...


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In some contexts used it can be construed to mean - so says you, an acknowledgment that a person's viewpoint frames their reality, while not ascribing to that view. It can be a kind way to say I don't agree, but as long as you think it, it will manifest itself as truth and you will find multiple "proofs" to reinforce that idea. Much of human reasoning is ...


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Do both of these quotes say one should prefer celibacy to marriage? The short answer is: no Notice in Matt 19:11-12 Jesus begins by saying "Not everyone can accept this word, but only those to whom it has been given" and he concludes "The one who can accept this should accept it." clearly then he is speaking about a particular class of people. Paul is ...


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They are little children in the kingdom (one could say, little Christs), Matthew 18:3 and said, "Assuredly, I say to you, unless you are converted and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven." Matthew 18:4 Therefore whoever humbles himself as this little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. ...


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It seems to me that the Author intends us to read the parable of the Mustard seed and the parable of the leaven together, hence the pericope is v31-33 31 Another parable He put forth to them, saying: "The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and sowed in his field, 32 "which indeed is the least of all the seeds; but when it is ...


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Rex Wyler, in The Jesus Sayings, page 111, says the parable of the leaven in the flour appears to satirise a story (Genesis 18:6) about Sarah, who used three measures of choice flour to bake cakes for heavenly messengers visiting Abraham. I would call this a long shot, but then we find the story of the leaven follows the parable of the mustard seed in Luke ...


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I don't think so. The passage has been viewed in at least two ways. In both views the purpose of the words of Jesus were still to answer a trick question by the pharisees. Matthew 22:15-22New International Version (NIV) Paying the Imperial Tax to Caesar 15 Then the Pharisees went out and laid plans to trap him in his words. 16 They sent their ...


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It is probably easier to address the questions in reverse order. Question 2) Why the significant difference between the NA27 and TR in Matthew, but not in Luke? Comfort and Metzger both explain that the reading τέκνων most likely originated as a scribal emendation intended to harmonize this text with the parallel in Luke 7:35. Metzger for example ...


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John 3:13 (even the son of man)? And no man hath ascended up to heaven, but he that came down from heaven, even the Son of man which is in heaven. Mark 8:38 (me and my words followed by of him, when he, of his)? For whoever is ashamed of Me and My words in this adulterous and sinful generation, the Son of Man will also be ashamed of him when He comes in ...


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The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...


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In his book “ The parabel of the sower” Paul Mueller writes that he has "the heart of the beast", and that he has received his wisdom because he has "the heart of the beast". He writes that all must have "the heart of the beast" and must have the desire to have "the mark of the beast". Only he who has the heart and the mark of the beast would do the ...


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S. Levinsohn and R. Buth [1] discourage linking discourse boundaries to surface features. In other words it is a bad habit to think that you will find a boundary for a semantic-pragmatic unit MARKED by a particular fixed expression. Matthew uses τότε more often than any other gospel, 90 times in NA27 compared to Luke 15, John 10, Mark 6. Levinsohn claims ...


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Matthew's Gospel is substantially copied from two main sources, maintaining the same sequence as those two sources, while weaving material from one source (the hypothetical 'Q' document') into material from the other (Mark's Gospel). Mark's Gospel is well structured (as shown here) and Q seems to have a structure, although looser than that of Mark, but these ...


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The two records need not be seen as incompatible: Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. (2 Timothy 2:15 NKJV) It is a matter of belief. If one chooses to believe both records are completely factual, then simply look for the places where the records need to be ...


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Each gospel writer put in those things which further and advance the conclusion to which he is heading toward. Of importance to Matthew is the royal line coming down from king David. Jesus must have a royal bloodline so David is mentioned 6 times in chap. 1. In MATT.1:1 David is mentioned before Abraham who fathered the nation of Israel. This shows Jesus ...


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Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 7, that the nativity accounts in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are, with respect to time, place, and circumstances, a collection of legends. She says (page 11) Luke wants to make the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem plausible by fabricating the story of the census. But since he handles the facts ...


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Question Restatement: Based on this case, what are the arguments (not opinions!) (pro and con) of translating differently different words in the original, even if they seem to be synonymous? Answer: To maintain the same level of Cognitive Internalization, the words would/should be translated distinctly to convey dramatic sense--but not to the point of ...


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Question Restatement: How should Jesus' command to "Not Resist, [Oppose], Evil" be interpreted--and to what extant? Organization: (1.) Answer: How NOT to Oppose Evil (2.) How TO Oppose Evil (3.) What about Defending Others? (4.) What about Self Defense, and other Contexts? (5.) What if the Authorities Fail? 1. Answer: How NOT to Oppose Evil Answer: ...


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Your question is: Based on this case, what are the arguments (not opinions!) (pro and con) of translating differently different words in the original, even if they seem to be synonymous? Pro distinction in translation More transparency of the original text: One cannot argue the fact that using a different word in translation for each distinct ...


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I suspect that lurking behind Piper's formulation is awareness of forms of rabbinic interpretation. The principle in question here is the so-called qal waḥomer, literally "the light and the weighty". This was the logical move either from greater to lesser (a majori ad minus) or vice-versa (a minori ad majus). This form of argument was accredited to Hillel, ...


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Question Restatement: Jesus says that loving your friends is not that big an achievement. If that’s true, shouldn’t the verse in John read, "Greater love, (ἀγάπην) has no one than this: to lay down one's life for one's enemies?" Although Jesus said to "Love, (ἀγαπᾶτε)" your enemies, he never declared that this would, or should, or even can, transform ...



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