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The Greek word behind remorse/repent is μεταμεληθεὶς, pronounced metameletheis, coming from metamelomai. It is found six times in the New Testament: Matthew 21:29, 32; 27:3; 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice); and Hebrews 7:21 (quoting from Psalm 110:4 where it translates the Hebrew nacham). It is uniformly translated as "repent" in the KJV. While some may say that ...


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The word 'magi' Nolland summarizes the initial difficulty as such: The word 'Magi' was originally applied exclusively to members of a priestly caste of the Medes and Persian [sic] who had esoteric skills in interpreting dreams. However, the use of the word broadened to embrace various categories of persons who were marked out by their superior knowledge ...


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The wise men (magi) were probably astronomers who came from the land of Seir , (Edom) from where the Prophet Balaam prophesied about A star coming out of Jacob . The Magi would have been waiting patiently for the prophecy of Balaam to be fulfilled, evident here. There is even an ancient tradition that Balaam, the notorious prophet from Mesopotamia, was an ...


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Wiki has this posted, he is using a special use of the word. Noun magus (plural magi) (common usage) magician, and derogatorily sorcerer, trickster, conjurer, charlatan (special usage) a Zoroastrian priest Note: the two meanings overlap in classical usage— both derive from the Greco-Roman identification of "Zoroaster" as the "inventor" of ...


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As a supplement to Frank Luke's answer, I add another way of thinking about it. The construction in English is very similar to the Greek: not X, but [instead] Y. (Wallace calls ἀλλὰ here a contrastive conjunction.1) For example, if I say "Put not your hand into boiling water, but use a spoon." The contrast is between: X= put your hand into boiling ...


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For the names of the 12 apostles we have four different lists: Mt. 10:2-4, Mk 3:16-29, Lk 6:14-16 and Ac 1:13. They differ in the order, and also in some of the names. The pairing of Simon Peter and his brother Andrew is in Mt and Lk, but not in Mc and Ac, where they are 1st and 4th in the list. So I think this casts some doubt concerning any intrinsic ...


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"Lead us not into temptation" is a "negative" admonishment. "Deliver us from evil" is an "affirmative" admonishment. In this regard they are contrasts. That appears to be why it is okay to connect them with "but."


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The word translated "but" is alla. It is used to show the next clause is adverse to the first. Usually, the word is translated as "but." According to the NET translation team, it can be used in the sense of: 1) but 1a) nevertheless, notwithstanding 1b) an objection 1c) an exception 1d) a restriction 1e) nay, rather, yea, moreover 1f) forms a transition ...


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The Strong's number for "lead" is 1533 and is rendered in Greek "εἰσφέρω" (eispherō); it is a compound word taken from Strong's numbers 1519 and 5342; and it lit. or fig. means to carry inward. With the understanding that the spiritual life is a life that is lived from the inside-out or should I say that all that we encounter in life stems from the inward ...


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As a way of getting a slightly different view on the question, it's interesting to look at translations in other modern languages. In Spanish, for example, you can look up the RVR1960 translation, one of the best. Here's the phrase you get for the wise men. unos magos Now the word "magos" can easily be traced back, via Latin, to the original Greek ...


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They were astronomers. During that time period they typically travelled in groups of three, although the Bible does not say that there were three. The did not come to the manger either. The Bible says they met the "young child." It was a several year journey to get there. sources: Matthew 2 (young child) http://branham.org/messageplayer/63-0803E (they ...


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Priests, Astrologers, Healers, Diviners, Fortune Tellers, Seers and Shamans were a class of people who were considered to have secret and sacred knowledge. It was believed that their connection to the spiritual realm allowed them insight and access to wisdom and knowledge that could only be divine. This made them "wise men" and the Greek word for wise men ...


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Προσευχόμενοι δὲ μὴ βαττολογήσητε, ὥσπερ οἱ ἐθνικοί δοκοῦσιν γὰρ ὅτι ἐν τῇ πολυλογίᾳ αὐτῶν εἰσακουσθήσονται (Matthew 6:7 Stephanus Textus Receptus 1550) What does βατταλογήσητε mean? 945 battologéō – properly, to blubber nonsensical repetitions; to chatter (be "long-winded"), using empty (vain) words (Souter). (Source). What does Προσευχόμενοι mean? ...


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A survey of ancient incantations will reveal that it was common to repeat phrases over and over. This was thought to cause a god to better hear you and for the one offering up the incantation to better bend the ear of the subject of his prayer - typically in order to cause the spell or incantation to have more effect. In this way, God is distinguishing ...


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The problem occurs when Evil is not classified correctly. For there are two classifications. "The Knowledge of Good and Evil" in this classification Evil is used as meaning "Dysfunction" in Deuteronomy 30:15-20 however Evil is used as allowing the knowledge of Dysfunction to change your mood. See it was not that Adam and Eve never made mistakes. Those ...


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According to Matthew 19:9, getting divorced does not cause a woman to become an adulteress (or a man to become an adulterer); getting divorced and then marrying someone else does (unless the husband or wife committed fornication beforehand). This is why Paul says in 1 Corinthians 7:10-11 (NKJV): Now to the married I command, yet not I but the Lord: A ...


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According to Matthew, this is part of the Sermon on the Mount which begins in 5:1 and continues through the end of Matthew 7. In 5:1, Matthew states: "Now when Jesus saw the crowds, he went up on a mountainside and sat down. His disciples came to him, 2 and he began to teach them." so we can conclude that according to the author of Matthew that this is ...


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Jesus spoke primarily Aramaic followed by Hebrew and Greek. Since most of the new testament was written in greek, you will probably never find it recorded that Jesus said "YHWH" in scriptures. This doesn't mean he didn't say it, it's just a translation thing. Furthermore, it was Hebrew tradition to interpose the name Adonai inside of "YHWH" which is ...


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Jesus is simply correcting the Sadducee's wrong assumption that the marriage ties here on earth will continue after the resurrection. God has things in store for his followers that we can't even imagine (and I don't know about you, but I can imagine quite a lot): But as it is written: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of ...


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No. The tetragrammaton was not used in Jesus' time. Faithful Jews would avoid saying it so as to not transgress the third commandment. The most common circumlocution was "Lord" (Andonai in Hebrew or Kurios in Greek), though he might also be referred to simply as "Heaven." In answer to Jesus using El from the cross. El is the common word for God from all ...


6

Yes, Baptism is well attested in Jewish sources dating from both before and after Christ. These are both for mainstream Judaism and sectarian. From before Jesus, one finds clear references to baptism in the Dead Sea Scrolls. See for example, 1QS (The Community Rule) and 4Q274-276 (The Purity Texts). From sources dating after Jesus (but portraying ...


1

This is part of a series of illustrations on interpreting the law[1] We need to know how to interpret the entire series of illustrations in Matthew 5:17-48, before we can be confident we are understanding the specifics of verse 32. The illustrations are part of Jesus' explanation of how to interpret the law, and that he has come not to abolish the law but ...


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The surrounding context makes clear that the reference to taking up a cross is to be understood as a reference to death. 24Then Jesus told his disciples, “If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. 25For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it.[1] This ...


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After you learn what it means to have no other Gods before the Word. Then you will know what "take up your cross" means especially during your lunch break and you are needed back at work. But Jesus said to him, “No one, having put his hand to the plow, and looking back, is fit for the kingdom of God.” (Luke 9:62 NKJV) Yet some excuse themselves. ...


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The position in the question, that Father, Son, and Holy Spirit is not original to Matthew 28:19 is held today by very few scholars. Those that do point to a quotation from the early church historian Eusebius. In Demonstratio 3.6, he replaces "name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit" with "my name." This is then taken as a direct quote from the copy of ...


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The marriage tie can be broken only by death (Rom. 7:3) or fornication. Hence, to have a divorce for any other reason is to commit adultery. But I say to you that whoever divorces his wife, except for fornication, and marries another, commits adultery; and he who marries her who has been divorced commits adultery. (Matt. 19:9) So then if, while the ...


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In his contribution on Matthew in the Catholic series Sacra Pagina, Harrington notes the three major interpretive positions on this passage: From antiquity this term [ἀδελφοὶ] has been interpreted in three different ways: Jesus’ siblings, the children of Mary and Joseph (Helvidius); Joseph’s children by an earlier marriage, therefore the step brothers ...



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