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The Aramaic word for "perfect" in Matthew 5:48 "Therefore become "perfect," just as your Father in heaven is perfect," is "gmeera." Besides meaning "perfect," gmeera also means "mature" or "inclusive" depending on the context. Looking back several verses to Matt 5:44, one finds, "But I say to you, Love your enemies, bless anyone who curses you...." So, based ...


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The Lamsa bible translates Matthew 27:46 from the Aramaic as, "Eli, Eli, lemana shabakthani! My God, my God for this I was spared!" "For this was my destiny." It was a statement of victory and not a question.


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Pharisees took Sabbat very seriously. Yet they put often form over the content. They definitely counted their steps to avoid rules transgression. They surely avoided to go under Roman roof to make themselves unclean. However Jesus was seen by them as an enemy, heretic and polical risk. So they had urge to fix the treat they percieved. In Jerusalem of that ...


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Partitive is Nearly Certain as the Correct Understanding K. Grayston makes an argument for the inclusive view,1 but is challenged by both K. L. McKay's brief reply,2 and P.W. van der Horst's more lengthy reply,3 both upholding a partitive view. Grayston argues the inclusive view largely upon two points. First, the inclusive is the case in the primary ...


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It seems that "they doubted" if it was really Jesus who stood before them. This is why Christ gives them the reassurance of His deity in the following verses. Up to this point, the apostles had had the right example and the right teachings. Now after His crucifixion, He begins to "reassure" them and putting everything into perspective and systematically; ...


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The word “doubt” in the Greek that is used in the Bible is δισταζω - pronounced distazo. The Greek dictionary defines it as ‘to waver, hesitate’ and the modern English dictionary gives its archaic (ancient) meanings as: to fear; be apprehensive about.to be uncertain about something; be undecided in opinion or belief. A feeling of uncertainty about the ...


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The word "sword " means division, meaning Jesus came to divide light from darkness as it was done in Genesis 1.Anyone who takes Jesus Christ as His Lord and personal Saviour will not be accepted by those who are in darkness,in the family,community and even the love once. And when that happen it bring division,that is when a son will turn against his father ...


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From the point of view of morphology, ἠγέρθη is indubitably the aorist passive of ἐγείρω “to awaken, rouse”. However, already in the oldest Greek authors the passive of this verb is used also to mean “to wake up”, in effect intransitively. For example in Iliad 2.41 ἔγρετο δ' ἐξ ὕπνου “and he woke up from sleep”, without any suggestion that he was roused by ...


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I agree that Judas' remorse and suicide in Matthew 27:3-5 should be evidence that he had not known that the intention of the high priests was to have Jesus killed. Yet to believe they only wanted to reason with Jesus, or investigate his claims, requires incredible naiveté on Judas part, since their willingness to pay thirty silver coins, a small fortune at a ...


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In the Bible, we have two, rather different accounts of what happened to Judas Iscariot after he betrayed Jesus. Both involved him in a repugnant and humiliating death, but in one account he repented and in the other he seems to have been pleased with his lot until his well-deserved but accidental death. Matthew Matthew 27:3-5 tells us that Judas repented ...


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The earliest extant manuscript to favour ἀπιστίαν include C (Ephraemie Rescriptus; 5th C.) and D (Bezae; 5th C.). C is considered a weak Byzantine text in Matthew's gospel1. Textual critics tend to favour ὀλιγοπιστίαν over ἀπιστίαν for two reasons: ὀλιγοπιστίαν is the harder reading2. See for example Metzger who says: It is more likely that the ...


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the sword base shape is a wedge. Jesus is a wedge between good and evil, a wedge between christion and non christions. analize todays sword, the tip, the cross section. you will find a wedge. we think of the sword as a wepon, and it is. Jesus is our, the christians, wepon aginst non belivers. w## en I say Jesus I refer to the Bible.


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We can now say that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel and that additional material the Gospels of Matthew and Luke have in common have come from the hypothetical 'Q' document. John Dominic Crossan, in The Birth of Christianity, page 110-111, speaks of a massive consensus among scholars in favour of Markan priority. He ...


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Did Judas regret that Jesus did not fight or resist the betrayal or deliverence to the authorities? Did Judas have any Messianic ambitions? Example throwing the silver into the Potters place or hanging himself as an atoning sacrifice? Such was the plan of God for Judas. Jesus told Judas, you what do now, do it quickly. Judas did it.


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Lexicons frequently define παις in three senses: in relation to descent (son, daughter), age (young, e.g. infant, boy, girl), or ‘condition’ (slave, servant). The text of Matthew 8:5-13 does not clarify whether the ill person in the centurion’s household is a son or servant, but since Roman military were not allowed to marry, and the Jewish elders thought ...


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It is correct that the centurion refers to the sick child as παις in Mt 8:6. However, you might note that in the parallel version of the same story in Luke 7:1-10 he is called δουλος. This suggests that at least in this pericope παις means δουλος. In any case, it answers your questions as to why the translators have understood it in this way.


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We read in Matthew 28:19 "Go ye therefore, and teach all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Ghost:" The disciples or Apostles who all knew Jesus personally recognized the name of the father. Jesus is the name of the father. "I am come in my Father's name, and ye receive me not: if another shall come in his own ...


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First Temptation: Matthew 4:1 Then Jesus was led up by the Spirit into the wilderness to be tempted by the devil. The Holy Spirit led Jesus to fast, which means that breaking His fast before His Father commanded would have been disobedience, which is a sin. 31 but I do as the Father has commanded me, so that the world may know that I love the ...


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Basic principles One of the basic principles of understanding the text of scripture is to allow the text to explain its self in the original context and setting. Here we have three temptations. We know they are temptations because we are told in v1 that Jesus' purpose in going to the wilderness was to face the tempter (see also Mk 1:12-13 & Luke 4:1-2) ...


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The sin would have been in acting contrary to the will of his Father that was known to him. Stones into Bread Twice in Matthew's gospel Jesus feeds thousands with a few loaves (chapters 14 and 15). John adds that the crowd wanted to make Jesus king by force. This was the temptation, then, to solve the problems of the world in the wrong way. He could ...



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