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The name Yahweh. Came from a mythological God That the so-called Jewish people had believed in. notice I use the word so call you Jewish. because the Jews of back then. the Hebrew people. the actual one. were people of brown dark skin. they had arrived in Africa. about 7,500 of them. they had no language of their own. no culture of their own. certainly ...


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Most commentary on this passage (and Mt 12:25) stumbles on the rather misleading translation of "ἐνθυμήσεις" into English as "thoughts". In ancient Greek philosophy, "thumos" was quite distinct from a person's intellect (nous, noeo, noema) or reason (logizomai). Thumos, according to Liddell and Scott, is "soul, spirit, as the principle of life, feeling and ...


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No, Jesus did not subject Himself to the law of the land by paying the temple tax. For one thing, the temple tax (see Exodus 30:12 ff.) was not a law of the land, but it was a law of Moses imposed on the "sons of Israel" both as a ransom for them and for the maintenance of the "tent of meeting" (i.e., the tabernacle). By paying the temple tax Jesus was ...


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The textual variants are ἰδὼν and εἰδώς. According to Tischendorf, ἰδών is the well attested variant. ἰδών is a participle declined in the aorist tense, active voice, nominative case, masculine gender, and singular number. It is derived from the aorist tense verb εἶδον. εἰδώς is a participle declined in the perfect tense, active voice, nominative case, ...


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Your question immediately brought to my mind a verse in John's Gospel which precedes what is perhaps the most famous chapter in the Bible, save perhaps for Psalm 23. Here is the verse in context: "Now while Jesus was in Jerusalem at the feast of the Passover, many people believed in his name because they saw the miraculous signs he was doing. But Jesus ...


2

Matthew 27:46: ܘܠܐܦܝ ܬܫܥ ܫܥܝܢ ܩܥܐ ܝܫܘܥ ܒܩܠܐ ܪܡܐ ܘܐܡܪ ܐܝܠ ܐܝܠ ܠܡܢܐ ܫܒܩܬܢܝ Around (in the surface, face of) the ninth hour (3 o'clock in Roman time), Jesus yelled in a loud voice, saying "Ayl Ayl lamana shabaqthani" Written Ayl Ayl, lamana shabaqthani, Ayl means God in Syriac. It's independently ܐܝܠ but ܐܠ as a compound in names. lamana ...


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I believe the 'kingdom of heaven' here means the astral heaven, the 'heavenlies' as Paul calls it. Some people take it by force/violence, means some people actually do the sorcery to 'capture' astral zones. This is something like taking over the atmosphere of a meeting, or a home even, simply by forcefully barging in and filling the place with strong ...


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We need to start with Mark's Gospel, as this is the earliest source available to us. Matthew's Gospel is known to have been based substantially on Mark and, when copying the original gospel, its anonymous author sometimes resolves what he sees as errors in Mark's Gospel. An example is in Mark 5:1, where Jesus crossed the Sea of Galilee to the land of the ...


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In the larger context of the Matthew passage you cite (11:1-20), Jesus' focus is on John the Baptizer and John's ministry as Messiah's forerunner (see also Mark 1 and Luke 3). John's commission from God was to prepare the way for the Lord, and in essence John's message was a message (and baptism) of repentance. The common people flocked to John, and John ...


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It would first be useful to define what the "Kingdom of Heaven" is. In this verse, "Kingdom of Heaven" refers the the ecclesiastical government of the church, which is the kingdom of heaven on earth[1]. If you examine the Greek: καὶ βιασταὶ ἁρπάζουσιν αὐτήν. (kai biastai harpazousin autēn) "and [the] violent (violent men) seize (take it by force) it ...


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I've looked at this before. If I recall correctly, analysis of the source text helps. Even without source analysis, it's not too hard to get a reasonable interpretation. suffers violence The wicked are oppressing the righteous. the violent take it by force The wicked have overtaken the righteous. E.g. the elders of the people are hypocritical Pharisees, ...



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