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13

Greek text is Nestle-Aland 27; English text is World English Bible: 16:19 δώσω σοι τὰς κλεῖδας τῆς βασιλείας τῶν οὐρανῶν, 16:19 I will give to you the keys of the Kingdom of Heaven, "(to) you" [soi] here is singular καὶ ὃ ἐὰν δήσῃς ἐπὶ τῆς γῆς ἔσται δεδεμένον ἐν τοῖς οὐρανοῖς, and whatever you bind on earth will have been bound in heaven; ...


11

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


10

Occurrences in the New Testament Corpus ᾅδης (Hades) appears 10 times in the New Testament,1 and the context of each occurrence indicates that it is the abode of the dead. One particular account references the idiomatic idea of 'Abraham's bosom'2 and includes the idea of a division within Hades where some are comforted and others are tormented in fire, ...


10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


9

In Matt. 10:34, it is written, Do not think that I came to send peace on the earth. I did not come to send peace, but rather, a sword! μὴ νομίσητε ὅτι ἦλθον βαλεῖν εἰρήνην ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν οὐκ ἦλθον βαλεῖν εἰρήνην ἀλλὰ μάχαιραν The "sword" (Greek μάχαιρα) represents "division" (Greek διαμερισμός), and this is evident when we examine the Synoptic ...


9

Jesus continuously said things that got to the heart of the matter. This example is no different. In your quote from Matthew we see a young man that wants to know what good thing he must do to get eternal life. Eventually, Jesus says what you have quoted. What the man then does and what Jesus says immediately after revels what Jesus meant. 22 When the ...


9

The Greek word behind remorse/repent is μεταμεληθεὶς, pronounced metameletheis, coming from metamelomai. It is found six times in the New Testament: Matthew 21:29, 32; 27:3; 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice); and Hebrews 7:21 (quoting from Psalm 110:4 where it translates the Hebrew nacham). It is uniformly translated as "repent" in the KJV. While some may say that ...


8

This answer is just a brief attempt at the leading question, "What is the meaning of this parable?" Interest is expressed in Matthew's version of the parable in particular. The "sower and seed" parable appears in each of the three Synoptic Gospels, Matt 13:3-25 // Mk 4:3-20 // Luke 8:5-15, with some variations in the parable and its explanation. This is ...


8

Lexical Discussion The etymology of the word ἀδελφός is "from the collative a ..., denoting unity, and delphús (n.f.), a womb."1 So the chief idea is as BDAG and other lexicons state,2 that of a true brother or sister coming from the same mother (parents).3 However, as you noted, the word can be used in a variety of figurative, yet still physical relation ...


7

The oldest surviving copies of the New Testament date to the 4th century, after Constantine declared Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire. Of all the manuscripts made prior to that, only fragments survive. For the Gospel of Matthew, the oldest surviving fragments are Papyrus 77, containing part of Matthew 23; Papyrus 103, parts of Matthew ...


7

This may be related to another question about the parable that is the context for this question on Matthew 18:34 in particular. OP: What is the original word used in our oldest manuscripts and how has that word been traditionally used? The word used here for "torturers" is τοῖς βασανισταῖς or, in its lexical form, βασανιστής (basanistēs). There are no ...


7

General Statements on Jesus' Son of Man and Enoch's Son of Man There is a literary connection. Brad Young (a scholar who seeks to illuminate the words of the New Testament by their parallels in rabbinic and intertestamental literature) includes a section on Enoch's use of the Son of Man in his work Jesus the Jewish Theologian.1 In 1 Enoch 46, we read: 1 ...


6

In this context, the Greek ὠδῖνες refer to the birth pangs a woman experiences while in labor. Basically, the Jews referred to these by the phrase חבלי דמשיח 1 or חבלו של משיח,2 literally "the birth pangs of the Messiah." They are not birth pangs that the Messiah himself experiences (a subjective genitive, if you will), but birth pangs that Israel ...


6

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


6

There were two main qualifications, one is primarily cultural, and one is really universal. A host family (or person) would need to be hospitable. Abraham, Lot, and others throughout the Old Testament were "lovers of strangers" (to use an anachronistic expression derived from the Greek word for hospitality). In the ANE, hospitality and being a good ...


6

According to The Greek New Testament (4th Edition), edited by Aland, Metzger, et al. (2012), this verse does not appear in the best Greek manuscripts available. In order to save ourselves the tedious task of comparing and contrasting the pros and cons of the variant readings, the late Bruce Metzger has also published the companion volume, which is A Textual ...


6

Is this a significant scholarly position? Significant enough that it is discussed regularly in various scholarly places. For example, there is extensive discussion in a fairly recent work: D. A. Carson and Douglas J. Moo, An Introduction to the New Testament, 2nd ed. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2005), 142-150 (hereafter referred to as C&M). In that ...


6

No, it does not mean that they all share the same name. It does not even mean that any of them has a name at all. "In the name of" is a fixed phrase. It is a single unit with a fixed meaning, "with appeal to" or "by the authority of" and that's all there is to it. You are free to replace it, as a whole, with either of these paraphrases to see that ...


6

Yes, Baptism is well attested in Jewish sources dating from both before and after Christ. These are both for mainstream Judaism and sectarian. From before Jesus, one finds clear references to baptism in the Dead Sea Scrolls. See for example, 1QS (The Community Rule) and 4Q274-276 (The Purity Texts). From sources dating after Jesus (but portraying ...


6

No. The tetragrammaton was not used in Jesus' time. Faithful Jews would avoid saying it so as to not transgress the third commandment. The most common circumlocution was "Lord" (Andonai in Hebrew or Kurios in Greek), though he might also be referred to simply as "Heaven." In answer to Jesus using El from the cross. El is the common word for God from all ...


5

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in ...


5

Both the Greek verb προσκυνέω and its Hebrew equivalent השתחוה literally mean "pay homage," "make obeisance." It is an act of reverence given to one's superior. Contrary to popular belief, it is not solely used in reference to God. For example, see Exo. 18:7: And Moses went out to meet his father in law, and did obeisance, and kissed him; and they asked ...


5

First, let's examine the usage of this word in Scripture itself: Hades is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Sheol. This Greek word appears 10 times in the NT; word study indicates the following: -it is down (as opposed to the heavens) & it is used as a negative consequence --Mt 11:23, Lk 10:15 -it is a force that would attempt to overcome the ...


5

The clear questions posed might be worded this way: how, in Roman-era Palestine, would an imprisoned slave pay back a financial debt? The impetus comes from Jesus' parable of the unforgiving servant/slave of Matthew 18:21-35. It really requires an answer in two parts: first, to explain why the concern of OP's main question would not be in the thoughts of ...


5

Texts in Greek It's worth noting that the command to "love neighbour as self" extends beyond these two parallel passages from the gospels, and originates in a much earlier time and in a different language. Here are the texts in Greek: Leviticus 19:18 ... καὶ ἀγαπήσεις τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν ἐγώ εἰμι κύριος ... and you shall love your neighbour ...


5

Here is the text of Matthew 16:18 set out in Greek of Nestle-Aland 27 and English of ESV (as above): κἀγὼ δέ σοι λέγω ὅτι σὺ εἶ Πέτρος, kagō de soi legō hoti su ei Petros And I tell you, you are Peter, καὶ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ τῇ πέτρᾳ οἰκοδομήσω μου τὴν ἐκκλησίαν kai epi tautē tē(i) petra(i) oikodomēsō mou tēn ekklēsian and on this rock I will build ...


5

There are a few scattered scholars who did believe this, though it is certainly not the prevailing opinion. The Wikipedia article, as well as most Biblical Encyclopedias, write that the text of Matthew doesn't look like a translation. However, at least a few scholars did believe that the Gospel of Matthew was first written in Hebrew. The Wikipedia article ...


5

The Connection is Unnecessary (Probably Unprovable) It seems unprovable that it is certainly a reference to 1 Enoch 69:27 (see Frank Luke's answer for a possible connection), simply because there is too much other canonical OT background material to support the statement without such a direct connection. The connection between the Son of Man and sitting on ...


5

The word translated "but" is alla. It is used to show the next clause is adverse to the first. Usually, the word is translated as "but." According to the NET translation team, it can be used in the sense of: 1) but 1a) nevertheless, notwithstanding 1b) an objection 1c) an exception 1d) a restriction 1e) nay, rather, yea, moreover 1f) forms a transition ...



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