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10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


10

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


9

Occurrences in the New Testament Corpus ᾅδης (Hades) appears 10 times in the New Testament,1 and the context of each occurrence indicates that it is the abode of the dead. One particular account references the idiomatic idea of 'Abraham's bosom'2 and includes the idea of a division within Hades where some are comforted and others are tormented in fire, ...


7

The correct answer to this question seems to depend on which Greek lexicons and Bible commentaries you consult. In some older Bible commentaries, the Greek phrase συ ειπας is considered assent; e.g.: 1: "thou hast said the truth [and it] is so" (Barnes Notes on the Bible, ca. 1865 A.D.); 2: "'Ye have said,' was a common form of expression for "Yes" (Clarke ...


7

The OP asked: "What is the exact meaning of this verse?" In the TR and BMT/GMT texts, Matt. 25:13 reads: γρηγορειτε ουν οτι ουκ οιδατε την ημεραν ουδε την ωραν εν η ο υιος του ανθρωπου ερχεται A better rendering from the Greek into English might be: "Be accordingly vigilant because no man knows the day or time when the son of man comes." ...


7

In Matt. 10:34, it is written, μὴ νομίσητε ὅτι ἦλθον βαλεῖν εἰρήνην ἐπὶ τὴν γῆν οὐκ ἦλθον βαλεῖν εἰρήνην ἀλλὰ μάχαιραν Do not think that I came to send peace on the earth. I did not come to send peace, but rather, a sword! The "sword" (Greek μάχαιρα) represents "division" (Greek διαμερισμός), and this is evident when we examine the Synoptic ...


7

This answer is just a brief attempt at the leading question, "What is the meaning of this parable?" Interest is expressed in Matthew's version of the parable in particular. The "sower and seed" parable appears in each of the three Synoptic Gospels, Matt 13:3-25 // Mk 4:3-20 // Luke 8:5-15, with some variations in the parable and its explanation. This is ...


7

This may be related to another question about the parable that is the context for this question on Matthew 18:34 in particular. OP: What is the original word used in our oldest manuscripts and how has that word been traditionally used? The word used here for "torturers" is τοῖς βασανισταῖς or, in its lexical form, βασανιστής (basanistēs). There are no ...


6

First, let's examine the usage of this word in Scripture itself: Hades is the Greek translation of the Hebrew Sheol. This Greek word appears 10 times in the NT; word study indicates the following: -it is down (as opposed to the heavens) & it is used as a negative consequence --Mt 11:23, Lk 10:15 -it is a force that would attempt to overcome the ...


6

As the NET translators point out: There are several options for the meaning of Jesus’ reply Leave the dead to bury their own dead: Recent research suggests that burial customs in the vicinity of Jerusalem from about 20 B.C. to A.D. 70 involved a reinterment of the bones a year after the initial burial, once the flesh had rotted away. At ...


6

A supplement to Mark Edward's answer: Though "strength" and "praise" are two very different words, the "strength" in Ps 8 in the Hebrew text comes from "mouths", and the psalm is about praising God. It is not a stretch to think that the psalm talks about praise from the infants' mouths. Moreover, the New Testament seldom quotes the Old Testament word for ...


6

In this context, the Greek ὠδῖνες refer to the birth pangs a woman experiences while in labor. Basically, the Jews referred to these by the phrase חבלי דמשיח 1 or חבלו של משיח,2 literally "the birth pangs of the Messiah." They are not birth pangs that the Messiah himself experiences (a subjective genitive, if you will), but birth pangs that Israel ...


6

The oldest surviving copies of the New Testament date to the 4th century, after Constantine declared Christianity the official religion of the Roman Empire. Of all the manuscripts made prior to that, only fragments survive. For the Gospel of Matthew, the oldest surviving fragments are Papyrus 77, containing part of Matthew 23; Papyrus 103, parts of Matthew ...


6

There were two main qualifications, one is primarily cultural, and one is really universal. A host family (or person) would need to be hospitable. Abraham, Lot, and others throughout the Old Testament were "lovers of strangers" (to use an anachronistic expression derived from the Greek word for hospitality). In the ANE, hospitality and being a good ...


5

Mark records that Jesus goes on to say: 43But it shall not be so among you. But whoever would be great among you must be your servant, 44and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. ESV So you could ask "who in the Bible most fits that description?". An argument could be made for Paul or perhaps one of the other apostles, but I do not ...


5

In the Hebrew Bible, salt is both a disinfectant and preservative, but if the salt loses its integrity (or its "flavor" to preserve) the result is disintegration. When Jesus talked about salt "trampled under feet," he was referring to this latter connotation of disintegration found in the Hebrew Bible. So when salt maintains its integrity (or its "flavor" to ...


5

“Judge not, that you be not judged. For with the judgment you pronounce you will be judged, and with the measure you use it will be measured to you. Why do you see the speck that is in your brother's eye, but do not notice the log that is in your own eye? Or how can you say to your brother, ‘Let me take the speck out of your eye,’ when there is the log in ...


5

The clear questions posed might be worded this way: how, in Roman-era Palestine, would an imprisoned slave pay back a financial debt? The impetus comes from Jesus' parable of the unforgiving servant/slave of Matthew 18:21-35. It really requires an answer in two parts: first, to explain why the concern of OP's main question would not be in the thoughts of ...


4

Jesus was born under the law to fulfill the law (Gal. 4:4-5)… He was bound to it in His life and to rebel against it would be to sin. Also note that the point of these versus when read in context was not to promote tithing, but to promote matters of the heart and show hypocrisy on the parts of the Pharisees. When read aloud and in context no-one will point ...


4

Your question seems to be rhetorical. Most likely, of course, Jesus knew the prophecy of Joel. Did he quote it? Very likely, even if we can not pin it down. Not all is written down. The book Revelation quotes it often. (It is said to be inspired by him. Apk 1, 1) There is a difference between the two situations in which persons would call on the Name of ...


4

This leaves a strong of impression of parallelism similar to such in Old Testament, and perhaps on even bigger scale - there are not two parallels as usual, but eight. What you are describing is referred to as External Parallelism, when correspondance exists between bicola (as well as within them). This kind of parallelism is not unique to the New ...


4

In part, Matthew is laying the groundwork for the naming of Jesus, so named because "He will save His people from their sins" (Mt 1:21). In various ways, these women reveal the mess of the Messiah's own family tree. Matthew is not of course implying that the women are the primary sinners in the stories they evoke. But the mention of David without Bathsheba ...


4

REVISED In effect, Jesus is likely saying to the man whom Matthew called a "disciple": "Let the spiritually dead bury the physically dead." As for the death of the disciple's father, there are at least two possibilities: The disciple's father had already died, and the son was waiting the customary year or ...


4

1. Context Matthew 6:22-23 is sandwiched between two passages explicitly about wealth, and the three passages together form a unit with 6:25-34 which is related to possessions and the necessities of life. The logical flow is: 19-21 Do not be short-sighted (seek treasure that will last) 22-23 ?    24 Do not be double-minded (you cannot serve ...


4

[Summarized from Brad Young's Jesus, the Jewish Theologian, pp. 114-116.] Divorce and remarriage are permitted under Jewish law, and Jesus did not prohibit the two acts. However, many Christians have made divorce and remarriage for any reason the same as adultery. There are even Christian denominations which do not allow their ministers to be remarried (the ...


4

Jesus was simply exposing the inappropriateness of the behavior of the scribes and Pharisees who desired to be honored publicly. Perhaps their top three favored forms of being addressed in public in those days were: 1) Rabbi 2) Father 3) Leader In Jesus' estimation and economy no one but God is as worthy of any of those appellations. That's ...


3

Judas almost surely knew that he was betraying Jesus unto death. Jesus told his disciples numerous times prior to his death that this would happen. Lets look through the book of Matthew. Matthew 16:21 21 From that time Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and suffer many things from the elders and chief priests and scribes, ...


3

I wrote a letter to a friend once that may better shed light on the subject: According to scripture Jesus makes use of the words tithe, or tithing, only 3 times (Mat. 23:23, Luk. 11:42, and Luk. 18:12). It is of interesting note that on all three occasions Jesus actually cursed the tithe payer. In fact in all three instances He downgrades the importance of ...


3

Abstract John is not part of the Kingdom of Heaven because his role is to point to and prepare the way for it. Jesus is speaking in the language of eschatology and not in the framework of modern Christian theology. The context of the passage is that John has been imprisoned by Herod: Now when John heard in prison about the deeds of the Christ, he ...


3

Jesus' childhood departure from Israel signified His exit from spiritual Egypt. If His departure from physical Egypt was in mind here, verse 21 would have been the only suitable place to note the prophesy fulfillment. 21 And he arose, and took the young child and his mother, and came into the land of Israel. Instead, the fulfillment verse is placed ...



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