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9

Textual Witness Analysis Here is what the Apparatus to NA28 (which omits the verse) indicates:1 ουαι δε (− 700. 892c) υμιν γραμματεις και Φαρισαιοι υποκριται οτι κατεσθιετε τας (− Δ) οικιας των χηρων και (− 1424) προφασει μακρα προσευχομενοι δια τουτο ληψεσθε περισσοτερον κριμα ƒ13 it vgcl syc bomss (p. vs 12 K W Γ Δ 0102. 0107. 565. 579. 700. ...


8

Ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐν τῇ δόξῃ αὐτοῦ καὶ πάντες οἱ ἄγγελοι μετ᾿ αὐτοῦ, τότε καθίσει ἐπὶ θρόνου δόξης αὐτοῦ· (NA28) But when the son of man comes in his glory (doxē autou) and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory (doxēs autou). (Susan's wooden rendition) There is no distinction drawn here between two ...


8

There doesn't need to be an argument/ debate about if the women is agreeing or not, her answers is a classic, 'yes....but....' answer. It is therefore both a partial agreement and disagreement with what the Lord Jesus Christ is saying. Matthew 15:27 ἡ δὲ εἶπεν· ναὶ κύριε, καὶ γὰρ τὰ κυνάρια ἐσθίει ἀπὸ τῶν ψιχίων τῶν πιπτόντων ἀπὸ τῆς τραπέζης τῶν κυρίων ...


8

"Is there any support for this claim?" It seems unlikely. On the one hand, so far as I can tell, Malina and Rohrbaugh offer no evidence in support of their assertion that the phrase γεννήματα ἐχιδνῶν = gennēmata echidnōn -- traditionally, "brood of vipers" -- means "snake bastards". And, on the other hand, I cannot see that this suggestion has made the ...


7

Using a more complete lexicon than Strongs yields more precision. But the entry to study here is "ἕως" ("until") which Liddell-Scott says: A.1. with Indicative, of a fact in past time... with impf. with ἄν in apodosi, of an unaccomplished action... but we're interested in: A.2. ἕως ἄν or κε with Subjunctive (mostly of aorist), of an event at ...


7

It's probably αὐτὴν, as the modern critical editions have it. The witnesses The genitive pronoun αυτης is found (among consistently cited witnesses) only in the 4th-6th Century "correction" of Sinaiticus and the f1 group of miniscules ("Lake Group") from the 12th Century. The original (fourth C.) Sinaiticus and 𝔓64/67 omit the pronoun, a reading ...


7

The Idea in Brief Very able Bible scholars in years past have addressed this question. Both the United Bible Society 4th Edition Greek New Testament (UBS4) and the Nestle-Aland 28th Edition (NA28) indicate that the verse in question would not appear to have appeared in the original versions of the text. There appear several reasons for this conclusion. ...


7

Word order often confuses more than it clarifies in the minds of English speakers (myself included) trying to sort out Greek syntax. In typical Greek fashion, the inflection of the nominal elements takes priority. In this case, ἁγίου must be an attributive adjective modifying πνεύματός because ἁγίου is in the genitive case,1 so it modifies a noun in the ...


6

Let's consider for a moment what the Farrer (Mt used Mk, Lk used Mk and Mt) and Wilke (Lk used Mk, Mt used Mk and Lk) theories suggest that the third evangelist in each case did. (For what it's worth, I would regard Kloppenborg's layered Q as a nuanced form of Wilke: he puts the sayings material in the Lucan order, then adds in some para-Marcan material.) ...


6

It's possible that both interpretations are in play and that the word pleion (translated "more") has a double meaning. Nolland (NIGTC) acknowledges: It is commonly taken to mean: 'life and body are greater than that which nurtures them physically; so, since God has given the greater, should we not have confidence that he will give the lesser?'1 So it ...


6

I don't think so. The passage has been viewed in at least two ways. In both views the purpose of the words of Jesus were still to answer a trick question by the pharisees. Matthew 22:15-22New International Version (NIV) Paying the Imperial Tax to Caesar 15 Then the Pharisees went out and laid plans to trap him in his words. 16 They sent their ...


6

I do sympathize with the sentiments expressed in comments here about the complexity of Greek particles. As I started looking into this I realized that there are many pieces of the puzzle that are well beyond my own Greek. However, there is a "rule"1 about whether ἂν is included or not (albeit a controverted and contradicted one), and in broad strokes it ...


6

Summary: The syntax neither confirms nor excludes the possibility that Mary remained a virgin after giving birth. This consideration was foreign to Matthew, and attempting to read his thoughts about the matter into the text is unhelpful.1 It’s easy to find websites and commentaries pointing out, in support of the doctrine of perpetual virginity, that ἕως ...


6

Having read the presentation myself, I find the idea pretty interesting. After all, it is quite likely that the Lord's Prayer was taught in Aramaic and not Koine Greek and, as such, would sound very different in accentuation, rhyme and tone - let alone the rhythm that good verse demands! There are a few problems with his process that lead me to say we ...


6

Both of those passages use the same Greek word αἰτέω (KJV: "crave", "beg", ESV: "asked for"), so any variance in the translation of it is due to the quirks of English, not Greek. Liddell-Scott says: ask, beg, mostly with accusative: ask for, demand Whether the asking is bold or not is not inherent in that word. The most we can say is that the ESV is ...


6

Matthew 23:14 is absent from some earlier manuscripts, which is a clue that it was not in the autograph, but not actual proof of this. David E. Garland (The Intention of Matthew 23, pages 15-16, footnote) says the evidence against its inclusion is strong, including text type and broad geographic base, while the evidence for its inclusion is weakened by ...


6

In Search of Lost Lilies (and reliable Bible commentaries) “[A]lthough there is little doubt that the word [κρίνον] denotes some plant of the lily species, it is by no means certain what individual of this class it especially designates.” So William Smith framed his widely-quoted and, as we’ll see, outdated entry for ‘Lily’ in his popular Bible ...


5

It is an argument of "Greater Vs. Lesser" The Body is Greater than the clothing that covers it Life is more than Feasting it's not about that God gave us the Body and the Life, it is that He cares about the small things in our lives. He feeds and clothes the birds NIV Version Matthew 6:26 Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or ...


5

Matthew 24:34 ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐ μὴ παρέλθῃ ἡ γενεὰ αὕτη ἕως ἂν πάντα ταῦτα γένηται. (Mat 24:34 BGT) I am not sure "supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty." really carries the sense of the sources you provided on the link. Rather then showing that ἂν denotes uncertainty of an action they demonstrate that ἂν shows the contingent certainty of an ...


5

Jesus states He is the Lord of the Sabbath. Thayer’s meaning of Lord κύριος: “he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has the power of deciding; master, lord; used a. universally, of the possessor and disposer of a thing, the owner.” When Jesus claimed to be the Lord of the Sabbath He was stating that He was owner of the Sabbath; it was His ...


5

The word Paul used in Galatians is different from that in Matthew: O foolish (ἀνόητοι) Galatians! Who has bewitched you that you should not obey the truth, before whose eyes Jesus Christ was clearly portrayed among you as crucified? (Galatians 3:1 NKJV) But I say to you that whoever is angry with his brother without a cause shall be in danger of the ...


4

A typical 1st century family home in Palestine was not one room but several rooms, on one or two floors, around a common open courtyard. Each room opened to the central space, so one lampstand in the central courtyard could shine into all the rooms of the house. The courtyard architectural type is well documented. The Neolithic site of Sha'ar HaGolan on ...


4

Your question is: Based on this case, what are the arguments (not opinions!) (pro and con) of translating differently different words in the original, even if they seem to be synonymous? Pro distinction in translation More transparency of the original text: One cannot argue the fact that using a different word in translation for each distinct ...


4

The only definition offered for φάντασμα by the very comprehensive A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament (BDAG) is "apparition, especially ghost". As such, we should be cautious of any other interpretation. None-the-less, let's examine the evidence for (near) contemporary belief in ghosts: A common belief: evidence Meyer's Commentary suggests that ...


4

According to the very comprehensive A Greek-English Lexicon of the New Testament and Other Early Christian Literature (BDAG) the normal meaning of πέτρα (petra) is "bedrock or massive rock formations". So, most often the writer/speaking will have something like an exposed rock formation in mind, not an individual stone. Matthew 16:18 is classified under ...


4

This is going to sound a little esoteric, but my belief is that He was doing things backwards compared to the way we do them to symbolize His coming to us. The way we come to God, we first come to the faith, and then accept His sacrifice. Afterwards we get baptized, and then the Holy Spirit tabernacles with us. I'm using this language for a reason. It's the ...


4

The simple answer is that we do not know why the writer of Matthew's gospel chooses this designation for her and we do not have enough evidence to go on to reach any firm conclusion. Whilst it seems improbable that the author did not know her name, whilst the writer of Mark does there are some possibilities that may be more probable: 1) We know that ...


4

Of course we can't be sure why Matthew chose to refer to someone as "the mother of Zebedee’s sons," but we can furnish a reasonable hypothesis by examining the evidence. Identity The first piece to the puzzle, is to determine who this woman was exactly. This question is actually rather simple. Later in Matthew, we find: There were also many women ...


4

Simeon did hold baby Jesus as the scripture says. According to Luke 2:21-22 this occurred after Mary's days of purification. Compare Luke's sequence with Lev 12:2-4: Luk 2:21 When eight days were fulfilled for the circumcision of the child, his name was called Jesus, which was given by the angel before he was conceived in the womb. Luk 2:22 When ...



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