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The word translated "but" is alla. It is used to show the next clause is adverse to the first. Usually, the word is translated as "but." According to the NET translation team, it can be used in the sense of: 1) but 1a) nevertheless, notwithstanding 1b) an objection 1c) an exception 1d) a restriction 1e) nay, rather, yea, moreover 1f) forms a transition ...


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As a supplement to Frank Luke's answer, I add another way of thinking about it. The construction in English is very similar to the Greek: not X, but [instead] Y. (Wallace calls ἀλλὰ here a contrastive conjunction.1) For example, if I say "Put not your hand into boiling water, but use a spoon." The contrast is between: X= put your hand into boiling ...


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"Lead us not into temptation" is a "negative" admonishment. "Deliver us from evil" is an "affirmative" admonishment. In this regard they are contrasts. That appears to be why it is okay to connect them with "but."


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Wiki has this posted, he is using a special use of the word. Noun magus (plural magi) (common usage) magician, and derogatorily sorcerer, trickster, conjurer, charlatan (special usage) a Zoroastrian priest Note: the two meanings overlap in classical usage— both derive from the Greco-Roman identification of "Zoroaster" as the "inventor" of ...


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As a way of getting a slightly different view on the question, it's interesting to look at translations in other modern languages. In Spanish, for example, you can look up the RVR1960 translation, one of the best. Here's the phrase you get for the wise men. unos magos Now the word "magos" can easily be traced back, via Latin, to the original Greek ...



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