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I don't think so. The passage has been viewed in at least two ways. In both views the purpose of the words of Jesus were still to answer a trick question by the pharisees. Matthew 22:15-22New International Version (NIV) Paying the Imperial Tax to Caesar 15 Then the Pharisees went out and laid plans to trap him in his words. 16 They sent their ...


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Your question is: Based on this case, what are the arguments (not opinions!) (pro and con) of translating differently different words in the original, even if they seem to be synonymous? Pro distinction in translation More transparency of the original text: One cannot argue the fact that using a different word in translation for each distinct ...


2

The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...


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It is probably easier to address the questions in reverse order. Question 2) Why the significant difference between the NA27 and TR in Matthew, but not in Luke? Comfort and Metzger both explain that the reading τέκνων most likely originated as a scribal emendation intended to harmonize this text with the parallel in Luke 7:35. Metzger for example ...


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S. Levinsohn and R. Buth [1] discourage linking discourse boundaries to surface features. In other words it is a bad habit to think that you will find a boundary for a semantic-pragmatic unit MARKED by a particular fixed expression. Matthew uses τότε more often than any other gospel, 90 times in NA27 compared to Luke 15, John 10, Mark 6. Levinsohn claims ...


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I suspect that lurking behind Piper's formulation is awareness of forms of rabbinic interpretation. The principle in question here is the so-called qal waḥomer, literally "the light and the weighty". This was the logical move either from greater to lesser (a majori ad minus) or vice-versa (a minori ad majus). This form of argument was accredited to Hillel, ...


1

They are little children in the kingdom (one could say, little Christs), Matthew 18:3 and said, "Assuredly, I say to you, unless you are converted and become as little children, you will by no means enter the kingdom of heaven." Matthew 18:4 Therefore whoever humbles himself as this little child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. ...


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Question Restatement: How should Jesus' command to "Not Resist, [Oppose], Evil" be interpreted--and to what extant? Organization: (1.) Answer: How NOT to Oppose Evil (2.) How TO Oppose Evil (3.) What about Defending Others? (4.) What about Self Defense, and other Contexts? (5.) What if the Authorities Fail? 1. Answer: How NOT to Oppose Evil Answer: ...


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Do both of these quotes say one should prefer celibacy to marriage? The short answer is: no Notice in Matt 19:11-12 Jesus begins by saying "Not everyone can accept this word, but only those to whom it has been given" and he concludes "The one who can accept this should accept it." clearly then he is speaking about a particular class of people. Paul is ...


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Each gospel writer put in those things which further and advance the conclusion to which he is heading toward. Of importance to Matthew is the royal line coming down from king David. Jesus must have a royal bloodline so David is mentioned 6 times in chap. 1. In MATT.1:1 David is mentioned before Abraham who fathered the nation of Israel. This shows Jesus ...


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Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 7, that the nativity accounts in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are, with respect to time, place, and circumstances, a collection of legends. She says (page 11) Luke wants to make the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem plausible by fabricating the story of the census. But since he handles the facts ...



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