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Lexicons frequently define παις in three senses: in relation to descent (son, daughter), age (young, e.g. infant, boy, girl), or ‘condition’ (slave, servant). The text of Matthew 8:5-13 does not clarify whether the ill person in the centurion’s household is a son or servant, but since Roman military were not allowed to marry, and the Jewish elders thought ...


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It is correct that the centurion refers to the sick child as παις in Mt 8:6. However, you might note that in the parallel version of the same story in Luke 7:1-10 he is called δουλος. This suggests that at least in this pericope παις means δουλος. In any case, it answers your questions as to why the translators have understood it in this way.


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Partitive is Nearly Certain as the Correct Understanding K. Grayston makes an argument for the inclusive view,1 but is challenged by both K. L. McKay's brief reply,2 and P.W. van der Horst's more lengthy reply,3 both upholding a partitive view. Grayston argues the inclusive view largely upon two points. First, the inclusive is the case in the primary ...


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The word “doubt” in the Greek that is used in the Bible is δισταζω - pronounced distazo. The Greek dictionary defines it as ‘to waver, hesitate’ and the modern English dictionary gives its archaic (ancient) meanings as: to fear; be apprehensive about.to be uncertain about something; be undecided in opinion or belief. A feeling of uncertainty about the ...


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From the point of view of morphology, ἠγέρθη is indubitably the aorist passive of ἐγείρω “to awaken, rouse”. However, already in the oldest Greek authors the passive of this verb is used also to mean “to wake up”, in effect intransitively. For example in Iliad 2.41 ἔγρετο δ' ἐξ ὕπνου “and he woke up from sleep”, without any suggestion that he was roused by ...


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The earliest extant manuscript to favour ἀπιστίαν include C (Ephraemie Rescriptus; 5th C.) and D (Bezae; 5th C.). C is considered a weak Byzantine text in Matthew's gospel1. Textual critics tend to favour ὀλιγοπιστίαν over ἀπιστίαν for two reasons: ὀλιγοπιστίαν is the harder reading2. See for example Metzger who says: It is more likely that the ...


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In the Bible, we have two, rather different accounts of what happened to Judas Iscariot after he betrayed Jesus. Both involved him in a repugnant and humiliating death, but in one account he repented and in the other he seems to have been pleased with his lot until his well-deserved but accidental death. Matthew Matthew 27:3-5 tells us that Judas repented ...



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