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Ὅταν δὲ ἔλθῃ ὁ υἱὸς τοῦ ἀνθρώπου ἐν τῇ δόξῃ αὐτοῦ καὶ πάντες οἱ ἄγγελοι μετ᾿ αὐτοῦ, τότε καθίσει ἐπὶ θρόνου δόξης αὐτοῦ· (NA28) But when the son of man comes in his glory (doxē autou) and all the angels with him, then he will sit on the throne of his glory (doxēs autou). (Susan's wooden rendition) There is no distinction drawn here between two ...


6

Using a more complete lexicon than Strongs yields more precision. But the entry to study here is "ἕως" ("until") which Liddell-Scott says: A.1. with Indicative, of a fact in past time... with impf. with ἄν in apodosi, of an unaccomplished action... but we're interested in: A.2. ἕως ἄν or κε with Subjunctive (mostly of aorist), of an event at ...


5

I do sympathize with the sentiments expressed in comments here about the complexity of Greek particles. As I started looking into this I realized that there are many pieces of the puzzle that are well beyond my own Greek. However, there is a "rule"1 about whether ἂν is included or not (albeit a controverted and contradicted one), and in broad strokes it ...


5

Matthew 24:34 ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐ μὴ παρέλθῃ ἡ γενεὰ αὕτη ἕως ἂν πάντα ταῦτα γένηται. (Mat 24:34 BGT) I am not sure "supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty." really carries the sense of the sources you provided on the link. Rather then showing that ἂν denotes uncertainty of an action they demonstrate that ἂν shows the contingent certainty of an ...


5

Summary: The syntax neither confirms nor excludes the possibility that Mary remained a virgin after giving birth. This consideration was foreign to Matthew, and attempting to read his thoughts about the matter into the text is unhelpful.1 It’s easy to find websites and commentaries pointing out, in support of the doctrine of perpetual virginity, that ἕως ...


2

Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


2

The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


2

First, "eternal" is in fact a direct descendent of the Greek word "αἰών" by way of the Latin "aeternus" = "aevum" + "ternus". When you say "eternal", you could also debate on historical grounds whether you are referring to a delimited or unbounded time. Greek is polysemic and "αἰών" is no exception, but in practice, the indefinite sense is quite common for ...


1

The video referenced by the question does a decent job of presenting the basics of the Jewish wedding customs and how it relates to Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32. However, I feel it lacks background, detail and also skips an important relevant piece. Groundwork I'll give a quick summary of the wedding custom as I have researched. The basic order of the ...



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