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13

The Pharisees were trying to trap Him. They thought they had an air tight dilemma. If Jesus says "pay the taxes," it will turn the common people (the people of the land) against Him. It would also turn the zealots against Him. If He said, "don't pay taxes," then the Herodians (agents of the king) have it from His mouth that He is fomenting rebellion. If ...


13

A little bit of Friday, Saturday and a little bit of Sunday could be properly describe as three days and nights in Biblical language. We think of days as 24 hour periods but they included in their common expressions a 'day' as 'any part of a day, or 'touching any part of a calendar day'. The term 'three days and three nights' was a Jewish expression that ...


12

This is a big question and I think it will help to refactor it into some related questions: What did Jesus see as his mission? From the passages you cited and the fact that Jesus spent most of his time teaching Jews, it's not a stretch to say that Jesus saw his mission as limited to Israel. Now Jesus did go into the region of the Decapolis, which began as ...


11

There have been several proposed reconciliations of the Matthew and Luke genealogies. Among the popular ones are: Matthew's genealogy traces legal heirs; Luke's traces biological ancestors. Matthew's genealogy traces the ancestry of Joseph; Luke's traces the ancestry of Mary. This view takes the phrase "as was supposed of Joseph" in 3:23 as a parenthetical ...


11

This argument is incorrect. Participles have a wide range of interpretive possibilities and sometimes choosing the correct one is difficult. Here is a resource that may help as I go along. The argument that since βαπτίζοντες follows μαθητεύσατε it must mean that it is a later action is a grammar myth along the lines of the abused aorist. So, it is true ...


10

I noticed that none of the current answers explicitly address the question of whether meek is a good English translation. Given the modern connotations of the word meek, it is not a good translation (though it may have been at one time), because in the modern usage it has a sense of craven pandering—the word, at least in my mind, has a derogatory ...


10

Many translations do use "And" or rephrase to avoid needing to insert a word there at all. The Majority Text looks like this: εγω δε λεγω υμιν οτι πας ο οργιζομενος τω αδελφω αυτου εικη ενοχος εσται τη κρισει ος δ αν ειπη τω αδελφω αυτου ρακα ενοχος εσται τω συνεδριω ος δ αν ειπη μωρε ενοχος εσται εις την γεενναν του πυρος I've bolded the word de ...


10

This is an attempt to give a brief theological answer, an answer that examines the words in their contexts and in their broader theological context, rather than a lexical investigation. The fool in Psalm 14/53 and in Proverbs is someone who is in moral antithesis to God. This is not an insult or a slur; it is an accurate description of the state of his ...


10

Jesus is quoting a version of Psalm 8 that corresponds to the Septuagint (Greek translation), which does contain significant variations from the Masoretic (Hebrew version). The Masoretic is used for most versions of the Christian Old Testament in English. The Septuagint was completed roughly two centuries before Jesus did his teaching. Psalm 8.31 εκ ...


10

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


9

The Greek is πραεῖς, which has also been translated gentle. According to this source, the word was used to describe a horse that had been broken-in among other similar usages.


9

I think you have it right there in the difference between what you quoted - the Lord's Prayer doesn't say "do not tempt us" (and James agrees as to why) and James does not say "God does not allow people to be dragged away and enticed" (which would make the world a very different place). A prominent example of God explicitly allowing someone to be tempted is ...


9

Raca means "empty headed," very similar to how we use "fool" today. Jesus also uses moros in that verse, which is the root of moron. While we normally need to take care not to commit the root fallacy, this one does mean the same thing. The word used in Hebrew is nabal which has more to do with consistently making bad moral choices. Brown, Driver, Briggs ...


9

I. Howard Marshall gives a concise statement of the options for harmonization in his commentary: It is quite possible that Matthew or Luke is simply reporting what was commonly said in Jerusalem, and that we are not meant to harmonize the two accounts. If we do try to harmonzie (sic) them, the following possibilities arise: (1). Judas hanged himself ...


9

The Hebrew word שמיים (shamayim), which is translated into English, is what is known in Judaism as a כנוי (kinnui), or a "substitute," "nickname." The reason why Matthew uses "kingdom of Heaven" more often than "kingdom of God" is because he wrote to a Jewish audience, and the Jews did not pronounce the Tetragrammaton יהוה, and sometimes not even the word ...


9

Occurrences in the New Testament Corpus ᾅδης (Hades) appears 10 times in the New Testament,1 and the context of each occurrence indicates that it is the abode of the dead. One particular account references the idiomatic idea of 'Abraham's bosom'2 and includes the idea of a division within Hades where some are comforted and others are tormented in fire, ...


8

"Brothers" in Greek The Greek word for "brothers" here is adelphoi (Strongs G80). This means literally "brothers". However, it can also mean "countryman" or "followers". The NET Bible (which uses the most current translation, taking advantage of the latest in linguistic scholarship) translates this as "brothers and sisters". The footnote for this says ...


8

One explanation is that the Hebrew נֵ֫צֶר "branch" (transliterated nazer, netser or so) is related to Nazarene. Isaiah's usage of the word can be seen as prophetic, especially in Isaiah 11:1: Source / Further reading: Miller, Fred P. Isaiah's Use of the word "Branch" or Nazarene.


8

There are a few suggestion as to why Matthew describes two people compared to the single person in the Markan and Lukan accounts. That Matthew is implying that there were other exorcisms (e.g. Mark 1:23ff) or blind-healings (e.g. Mark 8:22ff) and uses extras to compensate That it's introduced to provide symmetry as a 'popular folk motiff' (this from, I ...


8

The Hebrew for the phrase is: וְרֹכֵב עַל-חֲמוֹר, וְעַל-עַיִר בֶּן-אֲתֹנוֹת. NJPS translates this as: and riding upon an ass, even upon a colt the foal of an ass. Some translations have "an ass and a colt". The Hebrew isn't clear about the number of animals. The word גַּם means "also" in biblical Hebrew. We see it, for example, in Genesis 33, ...


8

Actually, I don't know of any Christian denomination or individual that tithes according to the Torah of Moshe. Tithing (עישור) is a relatively complicated process in Judaism, and of course, it's hardly (if at all) practical without a Temple. If Jews cannot tithe without the Temple, then Christians certainly cannot. With that being said, the general concept ...


7

What he's saying here can easily be understood as "What you have said is true." We can see this more clearly when we look at a parallel accounting of the event found in Mark: Mark 14:61b-62a (NASB) Again the high priest was questioning Him, and saying to Him, “Are You the Christ, the Son of the Blessed One?” And Jesus said, “I am." So, in Mark he ...


7

As far as the relevant wedding customs, Chuck Missler explains the traditional custom fairly well, as follows: 1) Betrothal - the marriage covenent is established, a price for the bride is negotiated and paid by the groom to the bride's family. There were also some symbolic rituals involved, but that's not so relevant to the question at hand. 2) ...


7

The Greek word is οπηειλεμα(3783), which according to Strong's means 1) that which is owed 1a) that which is justly or legally due, a debt 2) metaph. offence, sin The word comes from οπηειλο(3784): 1) to owe 1a) to owe money, be in debt for 1a1) that which is due, the debt 2) metaph. the goodwill due So a literal translation would be "debt", ...


7

The root κοπιαω (κοπιωντες is the present active participle form) does include both the idea of 1) the passive state of being weary from labor and 2) the activity of hard labor, sometimes to the point of exhaustion. I think the difference between those two ideas is more a difference of perspective than of essential meaning. In a strictly grammatical sense, ...


7

While these two statements may seem self-contradictory, there is a fine line which differentiates them. TL;DR: Matthew 5:16 says you should not ever be ashamed to do God's work in public. However, Matthew 6:1 warns that you should also not do these works in public simply for the sake of public attention. The commandment for us to shine our light is ...


7

External Evidence Matthew is almost unanimously testified as the oldest gospel by the church fathers. Clement of Alexandria even supported both Matthew and Luke as before Mark. This is significant because Mark is said to have founded the Coptic branch of Christianity in Alexandria, Egypt. If any place were to argue for Markan priority, Egypt would be ...


7

Theophilus was the Patriarch and seventh bishop of Antioch; he died in approximately 181-185 A.D. The Greek text below is from the third book, thirteenth chapter (Book III, Ch. XIII) of his apologia (defense) to Autolycus, who himself was a Pagan friend of Theophilus. An English translation by Philip Schaff is available at the Christian Classics Ethereal ...


7

Tithing was an institute of the Mosaic Law and consisted of agricultural produce and reared livestock (Lv 27:30-33). The Israelites offered the tithe to the landless Levites who in turn offered a tenth of the tithe to the Aaronic priesthood (Nm 18:26-28). Unlike the other tribes, the Levites were denied any inheritance or land ownership in Israel. They were, ...


7

Some say the "Kingdom of Heaven" refers to the a physical/political kingdom on earth while the "Kingdom of God" is the spiritual, coming reign of Christ. Arguments against the two being the same often come down to hair splitting and misinterpretation of verses. For example, the site listed above relies on a single verse in an attempt to say they are ...



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