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17

She was his wife all along. It's just that the word "wife" is used only when the woman is being referred to in relation to the man. In Hebrew the difference between "woman" and "wife" is just a matter of whether there is a possessive suffix. In English we don’t say, "her man" or "his woman" (except with certain connotations). Instead we change the words to ...


8

The word used in verses 14, 17, and 18 is bətûlîm, “evidence(s) of virginity.” This is from bətûlâ, “virgin”, which is used in verse 19 to describe a woman thus evidenced. It refers to the custom of retaining a blood-stained sheet or cloth from the bed where a marriage is consummated. The blood (dam betulim) is said to “prove” the bride’s virginity as it ...


5

There are some helpful reflections in the existing answers, although one flaw affects them all, and it is embedded in the question, as posed, itself... The Meaning of ṢDQ? The flaw is the assumption that Hebrew verb (in Gen 38:26) ṣādaq should be understood here as "righteous", where "righteous" stands for some kind of ethical purity next to holiness ...


4

Rashi cites the Midrash Bereshit Rabba (80:11) as saying that this was a son of Simeon with his sister Dena. the son of the Canaanitess: The son of Dinah, who had been possessed by a Canaanite. When they killed Shechem, Dinah did not want to leave until Simeon swore to her that he would marry her -[Gen. Rabbah (80:11)]. The Midrash Bereshit Rabba cites ...


3

In its biblical context, Ruth’s pledge echoes formulaic language for a covenant or a treaty in the Bible and the ancient Near East. It evokes divine utterances such as “They shall be My people, and I will be their God” (Jer. 32:38; also 31:33). It also recalls words uttered by King Jehoshaphat of Judah when speaking to Israelite kings who invited him to join ...


3

You focus on Tamar. But first I would encourage you to focus on Judah. Judah was familiar with the law (as were all players in this family drama.) Yet his two eldest sons were so badly behaved that God struck them down. What does that say about the kind of father (and man) Judah was, that he should have two sons who so displeased the Lord? And why, then, ...


2

To translate the so-called "exceptive clauses" of Matthew 5:32 and 19:9 as "unless the marriage is unlawful" (i.e., invalid) is a good translation, although it is not a faithful word-for-word translation. The word used in Greek is πορνεία (porneia), which means anything related to prostitutes and sexual immorality (wantonness, uncleanliness, impure ...


2

Tamar was more righteous because she saw the whole situation and Judah did not. She was “at the end of her rope,” in the society in which she lived. She had complied with Judah’s wishes as far as she could; she married two of his sons (Er and Onan), but she was at the point where she didn’t have any options left. It seems clear that Judah wasn’t going to ...


2

This is part of a series of illustrations on interpreting the law[1] We need to know how to interpret the entire series of illustrations in Matthew 5:17-48, before we can be confident we are understanding the specifics of verse 32. The illustrations are part of Jesus' explanation of how to interpret the law, and that he has come not to abolish the law but ...


1

Do both of these quotes say one should prefer celibacy to marriage? The short answer is: no Notice in Matt 19:11-12 Jesus begins by saying "Not everyone can accept this word, but only those to whom it has been given" and he concludes "The one who can accept this should accept it." clearly then he is speaking about a particular class of people. Paul is ...


1

Versus 12-16 teach a second ground for divorce, besides adultery, that applies strictly to the marriage of a believer and a nonbeliever. Such a marriage should arise only if one of two married unbelievers becomes a believer. This is true since it is written that believers should not yoke themsleve in marriage with unbelievers (see v. 39 & 2C 6:14). The ...


1

You must keep in mind that these societies predate any concept of "inalienable rights" or "personal integrity". Whether someone is righteous or not is up to the perception of their peers and chain of patrons (possibly all the way up to God). The god, patron, or public determine on a very subjective case-by-case basis what is right or wrong. Judah was not ...


1

Jesus is simply correcting the Sadducee's wrong assumption that the marriage ties here on earth will continue after the resurrection. God has things in store for his followers that we can't even imagine (and I don't know about you, but I can imagine quite a lot): But as it is written: “Eye has not seen, nor ear heard, nor have entered into the heart of ...


1

In the Hebrew Bible, a marriage ceremony is never actually described. True...hm...let me edit that...Song of Solomon might be one such description (if very poetic...but still might be or have a description of a wedding). Priests and their attendants (Kohanim and Levites) are responsible for work in the sanctuary, such as sacrifices and offerings, ...



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