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First of all, the two feeding accounts form part of an integrated set of passages with ten references or allusions to food, including a summary by Jesus of the two feasts in 8:19-21, maintaining a consistent theme of food, plus a minor theme of not understanding: Jesus and the disciples had no leisure so much as to eat , so they went into a desert place (...


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First of all, 'Mark' should be recognised as a consummate author, regardless of language. Harold Bloom writes (Jesus and Yahweh: the Names Divine, page 65), “Whoever composed Mark is a genius still too original for us to absorb.” John Carroll says in The Existential Jesus, page 17 that Mark was a virtuoso storyteller. On pages 252-253, Carroll says that the ...


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As stated elsewhere, we only have tradition that the apostle Matthew wrote the Gospel that now bears his name. A careful reading in the original Greek language shows that Matthew takes over almost all Mark's material, Mark's sequence of events and, for the most part, Mark’s wording. Uta Ranke-Heinemann puts the consensus of New Testament scholars succinctly ...


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The alternatives seem to be either that Mark continued the Gospel beyond verse 16:8 but his ending was lost, so later scribes wrote new endings, from which the 'Long Ending' was eventually selected Mark did continue the Gospel beyond verse 16:8 and the 'Long Ending' we now have was original to the Gospel Mark intended to continue the Gospel beyond verse ...


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If Mark and Luke were independent of each other, this would be a puzzling contradiction that we would need to resolve if we ever wanted to know in what order events really occurred. However, it is now the strong consensus of scholars that Luke was based on Mark's Gospel, with further sayings material taken from the hypothetical 'Q' document. Some of the ...



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