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John Dominic Crossan explains in The Birth of Christianity, page 106, that there is wide agreement that Mark 5:21-43 is an example of Markan intercalation. Intercalation, a literary structure also simply known as 'sandwich', is a technique used more effectively by the author of Mark's Gospel than by any other known author in antiquity. Intercalation involves ...


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Attempting to ascertain the root of the question, the following observations can certainly be made. First, they are "intertwined" on the basis of timing. Jesus was on the way to heal Jairus' daughter, and was interupted. Then, in v35, while he was still speaking (apparently to the woman who interrupted his journey), Jairus is told his daughter is now ...


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Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


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A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


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This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the ...


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As OP notes, the New Testament's Βεελζεβούλ [Beelzebul] appears to come -- somehow -- from the Hebrew Bible's (Christian Old Testament's) בַּעַל זְבוּב [baʿal zĕbûb], "Lord of the flies".a Two specific questions are posed: Is Beelzeboul a term derived from the Hebrew Bible, and if so how? The short answer is yes, errr, probably -- but the "how" ...


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it could mean that for some the real death will come with the coming of God's Kingdom. if those who actualy heard this verse are actually still alive today,... the verse says: "you will taste death, when the Kingdom comes". the verse does not actualy imply that some will live as long as the kingdom doesnt come, but that they will 'taste death' only when ...



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