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6

Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


8

A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


10

This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the ...


7

As OP notes, the New Testament's Βεελζεβούλ [Beelzebul] appears to come -- somehow -- from the Hebrew Bible's (Christian Old Testament's) בַּעַל זְבוּב [baʿal zĕbûb], "Lord of the flies".a Two specific questions are posed: Is Beelzeboul a term derived from the Hebrew Bible, and if so how? The short answer is yes, errr, probably -- but the "how" ...


0

it could mean that for some the real death will come with the coming of God's Kingdom. if those who actualy heard this verse are actually still alive today,... the verse says: "you will taste death, when the Kingdom comes". the verse does not actualy imply that some will live as long as the kingdom doesnt come, but that they will 'taste death' only when ...


2

Not the Romans, per se, but the religious leadership in Jerusalem ("the Council, chief priests, elders and scribes" (Mark 15:1)), who held sway with the Romans and were able to borrow soldiers (Matthew 27:65) and incite the crowds to force Pilate's hand (Mark 15:11-15). They also had their own soldiers (the temple guard), and generated fear through the ...


-3

In checking this I first looked at the KJV, which says Because it entereth not into his heart, but into the belly, and goeth out into the draught, purging all meats? Where is the "In saying this, Jesus declared"? Its not there. Now its not normal for the KJV to be the one to omit words. So I looked at the Greek. οτι (because) ουκ (not) ...


9

There are no important textual variations here: all our manuscripts include this parenthetical. There's no manuscript evidence whatsoever that this is a later insertion. (See this list of textual variants as well as the lack of any variants listed at the NET bible.) Thus we can be completely certain that the head of the manuscript tradition (that is the ...


9

This is not a question of textual criticism, nor is there any reason to reject the authenticity of Mark 7:19. It is entirely a question of interpreting the text. Let us look at the oldest versions: The Greek original has: οτι ουκ εισπορευεται αυτου εις την καρδιαν αλλ εις την κοιλιαν και εις τον αφεδρωνα εκπορευεται καθαριζων παντα τα βρωματα The ...



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