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11

I will start from the Greek and explain the reasons for the discrepancies between your translation and the ESV (which I consider a faithful rendition of the Greek here). ὅτι οὐκ εἰσπορεύεται αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν καρδίαν ἀλλ᾿ εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν, καὶ εἰς τὸν ἀφεδρῶνα ἐκπορεύεται, καθαρίζων πάντα τὰ βρώματα; (NA28) since not it enters her/he into mind/soul, ...


9

Hasting's dictionary is an old book and it does not reflect current scholarly opinion about Semitic languages. The Aramaic word ṭalyā, feminine ṭlīṯā is an adjective meaning “young”, and then a noun meaning “boy/girl” and “servant”. It is etymologically related to Hebrew ṭāle, Arabic ṭalā, which mean “young animal” and specifically “lamb”, but this is not ...


9

Should/could this text then read "And the gospel must first be preached to all Gentiles"? Sure. The reference is to non-Israelites in any case. In general the singular ἔθνος refers to a nation or people group, and the plural ἔθνη carries the nuance of people who are foreign to a specific group. In the New Testament, as far as I’m aware, it is uniformly ...


8

It is true that the "anarthrous" usage of "Jesus" (Ἰησοῦς) in Mark 1:9 is unusual. Of 82 occurrences of the name in Mark, only eight of them lack the article (1:1, 9, 24; 5:7; 10:47[x2]; 16:6, 19). There is something of a pattern, though, as aside from 1:1, 9; and 16:19 (which is in the disputed "long ending" of Mark), these occur with an epithet, not a ...


8

Rhoads, Dewey and Michie say, in Mark as Story, page 46, that Mark's style keeps the narration moving along. Instead of "telling about" the story in generalities and abstractions, the narrator "shows" the events by a straightforward recounting of actions and dialogue. Episodes are usually brief, scenes change often and minor characters appear and quickly ...


6

Both of those passages use the same Greek word αἰτέω (KJV: "crave", "beg", ESV: "asked for"), so any variance in the translation of it is due to the quirks of English, not Greek. Liddell-Scott says: ask, beg, mostly with accusative: ask for, demand Whether the asking is bold or not is not inherent in that word. The most we can say is that the ESV is ...


6

Within the surrounding dialogues various parties (the Pharisees and Sadducees) try to entrap Jesus, but this skeptical scribe listens and affirms the truth when he hears it. We would expect the scribe to believe Jesus' answer to be a basically agreed upon interpretation of what is the greatest commandment, but we would not expect him to add in, "...is ...


5

If we approach the text with the presupposition that the canonical form of Mark is a unified work and we can thus expect the composition as a whole to make sense of the parts. Before we look at the incidental remark about the season, we should look at the intended teaching of event. It should be fairly obvious that Jesus wasn't just a hothead who was angry ...


5

No, it does not mean "I'll be sad until I die." The word ἕως ("until") is used here as a preposition rather than a conjunction, as pointed out in BDAG sub-entry #5: marker of degree and measure, denoting the upper limit, to the point of ... Mk. 14:34 ... The phrase then means "sorrowful to the point of death". This remains less than perfectly ...


4

The word 'ἠγέρθη' transliterates into ēgerthē, meaning in its infinitive form 'to rise'. To understand the intended meaning of the word in a specific case we should look both at how the word is used elsewhere in the same work, using a semantic analysis, and at the immediate surrounding context of the narrative, using an informative analysis. Note also that ...


4

The second of the two subjunctive verbs in Mark 14:12 is unproblematic: in classical and post-classical Greek the conjunction ἵνα is always followed by a verb in the subjunctive mode if the verb in the principal clause is in the present tense (as it is here). This is simply a rule of Greek grammar. The first of the two subjunctives is slightly more ...


3

The same word is found in Mark 10:51 and John 20:16: ραββουνι (rabbouni). Rabbi vs Rabboni (in English translations) The distinction in English versions is related to a choice between translation (using an English word) and transliteration (letter-for-letter copying of the Greek). In Mark 10:51, Rabbi (an established English word, albeit also originally ...


3

Aaron, Eleazar and Ithamar were specifically told not to rend their clothing in mourning for Nadab and Abihu when the Lord killed them for bringing profane fire to the Tabernacle: "Then Moses said to Aaron and to his sons Eleazar and Ithamar, “Do not uncover your heads nor tear your clothes, so that you will not die and that He will not become wrathful ...


3

In Mary in the New Testament, Raymond Brown, Joseph Fitzmyer, and Karl Donfried offer a fairly balanced presentation of the main interpretations of the phrase "son of Mary" that have been suggested by scholars: Mark is trying to stress the human characteristics of Jesus in response to "God only" view of his audience. That is, Joseph is not mentioned ...


3

The context of the verse in question, is a discussion that arose concerning Jesus' prophecy about the future destruction of all the magnificent buildings to which one of his disciples had drawn his attention: Seest thou these great buildings? there shall not be left one stone upon another, that shall not be thrown down. -- Mark 13:2 Peter, James, ...


3

τίς is an interrogative pronoun, and as a pronoun, it declines according to (1) case, (2) gender, and (3) number. The lexical form τίς is declined in the nominative case, masculine/feminine gender, and singular number. The Greek text of Mark 4:24 states, Καὶ ἔλεγεν αὐτοῖς Βλέπετε τί ἀκούετε ἐν ᾧ μέτρῳ μετρεῖτε μετρηθήσεται ὑμῖν καὶ προστεθήσεται ὑμῖν ...


2

The fig tree cursing narrative is found in Matthew's and Mark's gospels. Mark's account varies in sequence from Matthew's account as it is written in two sections: First, after departing the temple, Jesus sees the fig tree in leaf, but no fruit found, followed by cursing [Mark 11:12-14]. Second, after departing from temple (Where Jesus drives out money ...


2

The example Jesus cites, David getting the showbread, contains two authorities. One is King David over his men and the other is the high priest over the Bread of the Presence: So the priest gave him holy bread; for there was no bread there but the showbread which had been taken from before the LORD, in order to put hot bread in its place on the day when ...


2

The video referenced by the question does a decent job of presenting the basics of the Jewish wedding customs and how it relates to Matthew 24:36 and Mark 13:32. However, I feel it lacks background, detail and also skips an important relevant piece. Groundwork I'll give a quick summary of the wedding custom as I have researched. The basic order of the ...


2

Jesus' family didn't only include Mary (His mother) or Joseph. He also had many brothers and other relatives, such as aunts, uncles etc. John the Baptist, for example, was one of His cousins -which I'm sure everyone already knows. They were quite numerous! While a portion of his family certainly deemed Jesus to be "crazy" (who exactly or how many is ...


2

Patterns of participant reference in Mark 3:21 & 3:31 This post is focused on just one aspect of the question. The move from vague to explicit participant reference in Mark 3:21 & 3:31 which raises questions about the identity of "His own people" in Mark 3:21. Mark 3:21 NASB When His own people heard of this, they went out to take custody ...


2

In Mark 10:32, the evangelist writes that Jesus "took again the twelve and began to tell them what things should happen to him." Jesus tells them, Behold, we go up to Jerusalem, and the Son of Man shall be delivered to the chief priests and to the scribes, and they shall condemn him to death and deliver him to the Gentiles. And they shall mock him and ...


2

The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...


2

In Mark 15:43, the Greek text states, ἦλθεν Ἰωσὴφ ὁ ἀπὸ Ἁριμαθαίας εὐσχήμων βουλευτής ὃς καὶ αὐτὸς ἦν προσδεχόμενος τὴν βασιλείαν τοῦ θεοῦ τολμήσας εἰσῆλθεν πρὸς Πιλᾶτον καὶ ᾐτήσατο τὸ σῶμα τοῦ Ἰησοῦ (TR, 1550) which is translated as, Joseph, who is from Arimathaia, an honorable counselor, who himself also was awaiting the kingdom of God, came ...


2

I think you're reading too much into the KJV translation of Matthew 27:58. For example, the ESV states, He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Pilate ordered it to be given to him. The Greek word translated into English as "begged" is ᾐτήσατο (ēitēsato), which is a conjugation of the verb αἰτέω. αἰτέω can simply mean "to ask for." In ...


2

Read in isolation the text does not tell us clearly whether those who came and said "He is beside himself" were friends or family. However, the context gives a possible answer, because Mark 3:20-21, Mark 3:22-30, Mark 3:31-35 form an intercalation or sandwich (A1-B-A2). This is listed by John Dominic Crossan in The Birth of Christianity, page 106, as among ...


2

This seems to paint doctors in a somewhat negative light to say that she suffered under their care. That is one reading of the text but it is not the only one. Almost all English translations allow that reading, with the only exception I can find being the Weymouth New Testament: and had undergone many different treatments under a number of doctors ...


2

Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 138, theologians are by now in practically unanimous agreement that Mark 16:9-20 is a later interpolation. The Gospel original ended at verse 16:9 with the young man telling the women that Jesus was risen and they fled in terror, telling no one. If we regard the Gospel of Mark as divinely ...


1

There were many eyewitnesses to what occurred. You didn't have to be one of the Twelve to be an eyewitness. And there were plenty of opportunities for the church in Jerusalem to learn specifics about what occurred from people who were there and then relay some part of what they knew to a gospel writer. I use the word "specifics" and not "all the specifics". ...



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