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13

This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. The NA28 includes the text similar to the GNT you quote: . . . τοῦτο τὸ γένος ἐν οὐδενὶ δύναται ἐξελθεῖν εἰ μὴ ἐν προσευχῇ (NA28) . . . this kind cannot be driven out by anything but prayer (ESV) The apparatus notes the variant you ask about (the ...


11

There are no important textual variations here: all our manuscripts include this parenthetical. There's no manuscript evidence whatsoever that this is a later insertion. (See this list of textual variants as well as the lack of any variants listed at the NET bible.) Thus we can be completely certain that the head of the manuscript tradition (that is the ...


11

This is not a question of textual criticism, nor is there any reason to reject the authenticity of Mark 7:19. It is entirely a question of interpreting the text. Let us look at the oldest versions: The Greek original has: οτι ουκ εισπορευεται αυτου εις την καρδιαν αλλ εις την κοιλιαν και εις τον αφεδρωνα εκπορευεται καθαριζων παντα τα βρωματα The ...


9

A Plausible Majority Text Argument Susan's answer has correctly given the direct answer to your question when she states: This is a textual issue. That is, some manuscripts have the words and fasting while others don’t. That is the simple fact. Which manuscript tradition the particular translation in question is following determines the omission or ...


8

It seems that most of the commentaries take "at home" to mean Peter's home from Mark 1:29, which seems to have functioned as the base for Jesus' ministry in Capernaum. While both follow this majority opinion, J. Marcus allows that "en oikō̧" could simply mean "in a house" and R. Stein states the possibility that it is Jesus' own home. However, given that the ...


8

Another addendum to Susan's fine answer and ScottS's alternative account. All manuscripts are not the same, which is why the text critic's job is not simply that of counting noses. We have two possible scenarios an original shorter reading, which was subsequently expanded in transmission by the addition of "+ and fasting" after "prayer"; an original ...


7

Here is the various internal evidence that I am aware of, as well as evidence that indicates a "persecuted audience" which fits the idea of this being written after Peter's death at the hands of Nero. Evidence That could Indicate Peter as an Original Source It is possible to see connections in the simple, quick and unpolished nature of this gospel and in ...


7

As OP notes, the New Testament's Βεελζεβούλ [Beelzebul] appears to come -- somehow -- from the Hebrew Bible's (Christian Old Testament's) בַּעַל זְבוּב [baʿal zĕbûb], "Lord of the flies".a Two specific questions are posed: Is Beelzeboul a term derived from the Hebrew Bible, and if so how? The short answer is yes, errr, probably -- but the "how" ...


5

In the online report of the lectures by Ken Dark to which OP's links refer, there is a comment thread from some very learned participants. I take the liberty of quoting extracts from two of the key participants. Richard Bauckham (11th June 2013): The urban site currently being excavated between modern Migdal and the coast is part of the same city as ...


5

Paul's text about "working out your salvation with fear and trembling" in Philippians 2:13 is actually more likely about reverent, obedient awe rather than being terrified of judgment. I conclude this for three reasons: Paul uses phobos kai tromos (fear and trembling) elsewhere to mean "reverent obedience": Look at 2 Corinthians 7:15 where Paul describes ...


4

Joel Marcus, in his commentary on Mark, addresses this. "Pass by" is a technical phrase for a theophany: it's an aborted transfiguration scene. They weren't ready for it; they thought he was a spirit; they needed to recognize him as the Christ first, as happens in Mark 8 just prior to Tabor. "Pass by" is what the Lord does to Moses when Moses ascends Sinai ...


4

In Mark 11:27-12:44, Jesus is in the temple, where the Pharisees, scribes and Sadducees try to trick him into error, with one question after another. The question of the Sadducees is divided into three parts: 12:19 is a quotation from Deuteronomy; 12:20-22 is the narrative of a case; and 12:23 is the trick question by which they hope to catch him. The ...


3

Mark 7:18b -19 (ESV, NA28): Do you not see that whatever goes into a person from outside cannot defile him, οὐ νοεῖτε ὅτι πᾶν τὸ ἔξωθεν εἰσπορευόμενον εἰς τὸν ἄνθρωπον οὐ δύναται αὐτὸν κοινῶσαι, since it enters not his heart but his stomach, and is expelled?” ὅτι οὐκ εἰσπορεύεται αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν καρδίαν ἀλλ’ εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν, καὶ εἰς τὸν ...


3

There is no certain evidence that Q is earlier than Mark, although parts of it could be. Some scholars of the 'Q' hypothesis believe they have identified three distinct layers in Q, written over a period of time. The Didache, a community rule-manual of discipline on church order, is widely regarded as having existed, at least in its earliest form, earlier ...


3

The healing power didn't flow out until she touched his garment. More specifically, Matthew 9:20 says that she touched the “hem” of his garment. The Greek word for hem in this case is kraspedon1 which also means “tassle.” Before I proceed any further, a little backtracking into the book of Malachi is helpful. Malachi 4:2 says “the Sun of righteousness will ...


3

If one discounts the longer or shorter ending of Mark (For why scholars have rejected these endings see this answer.), there are only two explanations for Mark's apparently unresolved ending at 16:8. It was either an accident of history or a purposeful descision on the part of the author. Mark's gospel could have been unfinished due to the death of the ...


3

Jesus causes amazement more than once in Mark's Gospel and this is the only case that I can find for which the cause is not immediately obvious1: 1:27And they were all amazed, so that they questioned among themselves, saying, “What is this? A new teaching with authority! He commands even the unclean spirits, and they obey him.” ESV 2:12And he rose ...


2

Not the Romans, per se, but the religious leadership in Jerusalem ("the Council, chief priests, elders and scribes" (Mark 15:1)), who held sway with the Romans and were able to borrow soldiers (Matthew 27:65) and incite the crowds to force Pilate's hand (Mark 15:11-15). They also had their own soldiers (the temple guard), and generated fear through the ...


2

Your first two points are pretty well grounded in a middle-of-the-road, Evangelical and conservative interpretation of Scripture vis a vis Jesus' miracles. There are, perhaps, other points which could be made, but your two are certainly a good start. Where your hermeneutic might be lacking, however, is its omission of the pedagogical aspect of Jesus' ...


2

Matthew 27:46: ܘܠܐܦܝ ܬܫܥ ܫܥܝܢ ܩܥܐ ܝܫܘܥ ܒܩܠܐ ܪܡܐ ܘܐܡܪ ܐܝܠ ܐܝܠ ܠܡܢܐ ܫܒܩܬܢܝ Around (in the surface, face of) the ninth hour (3 o'clock in Roman time), Jesus yelled in a loud voice, saying "Ayl Ayl lamana shabaqthani" Written Ayl Ayl, lamana shabaqthani, Ayl means God in Syriac. It's independently ܐܝܠ but ܐܠ as a compound in names. lamana ...


2

In Mark 12:35-37, Jesus has not yet declared himself to be the Messiah, in fact he never really does in this gospel. The important thing is that the audience of Mark's Gospel has already been told that Jesus is the Messiah, or Christ. So, when Jesus talks about the Messiah, the audience knows that he is talking about himself, but the scribe does not. The ...


2

Both references imply a vigorous washing. Mark 7:3 has πυγμή (fist) which suggests a vigorous washing hand of fist; the same word is used for 'boxing'. Luke 11:38 uses βαπτίζω, which has a history of referring to not just washing, but serious, vigorous dipping, used for drowning, or drunkenness (like in English we might say 'sodden' for someone who is ...


2

It's definitely not "much ado about nothing." The Septuagint regularly translates the tetragrammaton as κυριος (Lord), as though what was written in Hebrew was Adonai, because that's what a Hebrew speaker would pronounce when reading the text aloud. In everyday English "Lord" doesn't carry much connotation of divinity even though the KJV often calls God "the ...


2

Evidence against inclusion Codex Sinaiticus is the earliest manuscript with a complete copy of Mark's Gospel, although even it only dates from the fourth century. Sinaiticus and some other important manuscripts do not include "Son of God." Christian authors up to the fourth century, including Origen, Epiphanius, and Victorinus quote Mark 1:1 without “son ...


2

Question Restatement: "In Mark 9, why is the crowd, (who was with the disciples as they were trying to cast out a demon), "amazed" to see Jesus--since he had not done anything yet? Amaze, from Merriam-Webster - - obsolete : bewilder, perplex. Mark 9:14 - When they came back to the disciples, they saw a large crowd around them, and some scribes ...


2

The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...


2

Patterns of participant reference in Mark 3:21 & 3:31 This post is focused on just one aspect of the question. The move from vague to explicit participant reference in Mark 3:21 & 3:31 which raises questions about the identity of "His own people" in Mark 3:21. Mark 3:21 NASB When His own people heard of this, they went out to take custody ...


1

The reconciliation of the four accounts can be understood by knowing the histories of the New Testament gospels. John Dominic Crossan says in The Birth of Christianity, page 109, the theory that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were actually based on Mark's Gospel is held today by a fairly massive consensus of contemporary critical scholarship. However, ...


1

It reminds me of Jesus telling the seventy in Luke 10 to "greet no-one". One could translate Mark 16:8 as "They fled, speaking to no-one". I think that could mean the women went straight to the disciples without speaking to anyone on the way. They were understandably afraid to tell people on the way because it would produce danger with the authorities to ...


1

John Dominic Crossan explains in The Birth of Christianity, page 106, that there is wide agreement that Mark 5:21-43 is an example of Markan intercalation. Intercalation, a literary structure also simply known as 'sandwich', is a technique used more effectively by the author of Mark's Gospel than by any other known author in antiquity. Intercalation involves ...



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