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8

Good question. My sense is that to get a fully satisfactory answer, Mark's version ought to be read beside the other accounts in the Synoptics (Matthew, Luke). (Those interested can read them, with the addition of John, in English and Greek at BibleGateway.) For Mark 11:3, the parallels work this way (n.b.: although John has a version of the "Triumphal ...


8

Mark is more reliable.¹ Even if you were to completely discredit Mark², something is more than nothing. You cannot reasonably compare the accuracy of one document that exists with one that is only speculated to exist. Anybody that tries to tell you differently is selling something³. Answering your stated question is really that simple. In the world of ...


8

There is no conclusive internal evidence but there are plenty of pointers that lend themselves to the conclusion that Peter is in some way the source, for example this blog post lists some examples: Peter is the first and last named disciple in Mark (1:16; 16:7). Peter is mentioned more than any other disciple in Mark. Peter appears in some of the ...


7

The NET Bible has a long note dealing with this verse. They decided to retain the reading. Mark 7:3 (For the Pharisees and all the Jews do not eat unless they perform a ritual washing, holding fast to the tradition of the elders. 7:4 And when they come from the marketplace, they do not eat unless they wash. They hold fast to many other traditions: the ...


6

There appear to be at least four decent options for the interpretation of "this mountain" in Mark 11:23 canvassed by the commentators. (1) there is no specific mountain in mind. True, the Greek here (and in the parallels in Matt 17:20 and (with variation) Luke 17:6, where it is "sycamore" rather than "mountain"; cf. also 1 Cor 13:2) is "say to this ...


6

Because at that point, for that clause, the Greek switches to Aramaic (they are Aramaic words written in Greek letters, a practice known as transliteration) with the interpretation following. Mark 15:34 καὶ τῇ ἐνάτῃ ὥρᾳ ἐβόησεν ὁ Ἰησοῦς φωνῇ μεγάλῃ· ἐλωι ἐλωι λεμα σαβαχθανι; ὅ ἐστιν μεθερμηνευόμενον· ὁ θεός μου ὁ θεός μου, εἰς τί ἐγκατέλιπες με; To ...


5

This is a tough one, and every commentator I've consulted (quite a few) acknowledges that this is probably an intractable problem. One common theme, however, is the resistance to simply explaining away the enigma and even offense. Two variables commonly condsidered are (1) the agricultural details (what is the season, and what kind of fruit?); which can ...


5

Short Answer: After weighing all of the evidence (both internal and external), it would seem that Mark 16:9-20 was indeed originally part of Mark's Gospel. The ending of Mark's Gospel is one of the major textual problems in the New Testament.1 As noted by the OP, the "problem" is whether the end of Mark (16:9-20) was originally part of Mark's Gospel. ...


5

Texts in Greek It's worth noting that the command to "love neighbour as self" extends beyond these two parallel passages from the gospels, and originates in a much earlier time and in a different language. Here are the texts in Greek: Leviticus 19:18 ... καὶ ἀγαπήσεις τὸν πλησίον σου ὡς σεαυτόν ἐγώ εἰμι κύριος ... and you shall love your neighbour ...


5

As Wikis noted, there are many Bible versions which render the Greek aor. pass. part. masc. sing. nom. verb CΠΛΑΓΧΝΙCΘΕΙC (σπλαγχνισθεις) as "moved with compassion, " or "moved with pity". The form of that verb, however, properly means "to have the bowels yearn" (Strong's G4697). And the root of that verb form (σπλαγχνoν) refers to "the chief intestines, ...


5

The Idea in Brief The passage leans more toward the reading σπλαγχνισθεὶς based on various textual readings to include Ephraem Syrac's commentary on Tatian's Diatessaron. Discussion Based on best evidence, Arland et al (2012) provided this verse as follows in their Fourth Edition of The Greek New Testament: Mark 1:41 (mGNT) 41 καὶ σπλαγχνισθεὶς ...


5

Here is the various internal evidence that I am aware of, as well as evidence that indicates a "persecuted audience" which fits the idea of this being written after Peter's death at the hands of Nero. Evidence That could Indicate Peter as an Original Source It is possible to see connections in the simple, quick and unpolished nature of this gospel and in ...


4

In Ps. 69:21 it says,"They gave Me also gall for My meat; and in My thirst they gave Me vinegar to drink." This is after the Psalmist says in vs 9,"For the zeal of thine house hath eaten Me up; and the reproaches of them that reproached thee are fallen on Me." Both scenes were witnessed in the life of Jesus: when He drove out the moneychangers out of the ...


4

From International Standard Bible Encyclopedia This is the favorite self-designation of Jesus in the Gospels. In Matthew it occurs over 30 times, in Mark 15 times, in Luke 25 times, and in John a dozen times. It is always in the mouth of Jesus Himself that it occurs, except once, when the bystanders ask what He means by the title (John 12:34). ...


4

To make the comparison a little easier, here are the texts (with key below): Stephanus (1550) Textus Receptus = TR 28th edition Nestle Aland = NA28 TR:    Καὶ ἤρξαντό τινες ἐμπτύειν αὐτῷ NA28: Καὶ ἤρξαντό τινες ἐμπτύειν αὐτῷ TR:    καὶ περικαλύπτειν            τὸ ...


4

The idea of sleep is akin to appearing like you are dead: you are someone who lies motionless in the darkness. Thus in the Christian New Testament believers who live in the darkness of carnality appear like they are dead (unbelievers), but in actuality they are alive -- it's just that they appear as if they are dead. 1 Timothy 5:6 (NASB) 6 But she who ...


3

Robertson says, "See Isaiah 66:24." Reading Isaiah 66:24: Then they will go forth and look On the corpses of the men Who have transgressed against Me. For their worm will not die And their fire will not be quenched; And they will be an abhorrence to all mankind. ...makes it pretty clear that "their" refers to "the men who have transgressed against ...


3

This verse has a parallel in Matt. 26:46, in which the same verb ἄγωμεν occurs. The particular conjugation ἄγωμεν also occurs in the following verses. It is the equivalent of the English phrase, "Let's go..." Mark 1:38 John 11:7 John 11:15 John 14:31 Thayer describes this usage sense as intransitive (lacking a direct object).1 However, it can be followed ...


3

In his Introduction to the Gospel of Matthew, Heinrich Meyer wrote, It was Matthew who, before he passed over to the service of Jesus, was called Levi, and was a collector of taxes by the lake of Tiberias, where he was called away by Jesus from the receipt of custom. From Matthew 9:9, compared with Mark 2:14 and Luke 5:27, it is sufficiently evident that ...


3

Mark is without doubt the most straightforward of the gospels. The book is short and engaging. It is more critical of the disciples than the other gospel, often in a humorous way. Often Mark includes details that Matthew and Luke choose to leave out, i.e. that the grass was green when the 5000 sat down to eat. Mark often chooses a few stories and tells ...


3

Mt 27:48, Mk 15:26 - Jesus is offered sour wine on a sponge Lk 23:36 - The soldiers offer Jesus sour wine Jn 19:28-29 - Jesus is offered sour wine from a vessel on a sponge These verses are about a different drink of wine than that in question. Mt 27:34 - The soldiers offer Jesus wine mingled with gall before he is crucified, which He rejects. Mk 15:23 ...


3

Reading this passage today made me want to research it. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath, and He came to fulfill the law not break it. This passage has several aspects that are best read together as Jesus combines them: Jesus and Disciples Pluck and Eat Grains on the Sabbath At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. And His disciples ...


2

We should not try to answer this question just by reading English texts, but at least supplement this either by reading the Greek texts or referring to material written by those who can. The issue here is that Matthew, Mark and Luke contain passages that are consistently in the same order (suggesting copying) and frequently use exactly the same words in the ...


2

No Failure of Theory Simply for Being on a Scroll Examine carefully the Isaiah scroll. About every three to four columns there is stitching of the pieces of parchment together. Codices are thus not the only documents with "leafs" (so to speak). It is possible for a section of a scroll to have separated at such a stitch point. Additionally The end of a ...


2

TWO KINGDOMS SIMILAR In the Bible, there are two different kingdoms that are mentioned. These two kingdoms are the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God. (Matthew 3:1-2 [KJV]) 1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, 2 And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. (Mark 1:14-15 [KJV]) 14 Now after ...


2

I would have to agree with everything stated above by Niobius about the style and aims of Mark's gospel. If I may add a little something, it's possible that, while being an accurate account, the tidbit about the naked young man in Mark 14:51 forms a loose inclusio with the fully dressed young man in Mark 16:5. Exactly what this is to emphasize is unsure, but ...


2

I find your question a little perplexing, though I assume--rightly I hope--that your question has to do with the apparently conflicting descriptions of the events which occurred after Jesus' death and before He resurrected and appeared to His disciples, starting with Mary Magdalene. In attempting to come up with an answer, I consulted Orville E. Daniel's ...


2

The focus of Jesus' question is on which is easier to say: "Your sins are forgiven" or "Rise, pick up your mat, and walk." The first statement is easier to say since no one could possibly validate such a claim. There is no empirical test that a man's sins are indeed forgiven. But to say to a paralytic, "Get up and walk" - this sets up an easy test of the ...


2

An explanation is found in Smith's Comprehensive Bible Dictionary. I found it as a footnote in the book Jesus the Christ by James E. Talmage: There are three kinds of fig trees in the East: Early fig, ripening about the end of June Summer fig, ripening in August Winter fig, larger and darker than the summer fig, hanging and ripening late on ...


2

In short, according to Jesus we are to love our neighbor in the same way we already love ourselves. That is, I believe, the meaning of the word as in the crucial phrase "love your neighbor as yourself." Self-love comes naturally--perhaps too naturally--to all of us. We feed, clothe, and house ourselves, shrinking from pain and moving toward pleasure. ...



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