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8

According to Bruce M. Metzger, in his able Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Stuttgart: Deutschebibelgesellschaft, 2012), the academy places their highest certitude "{A}" that the verse of Mark 11:26 was not part of the original autograph. On Page 93 of his commentary, Metzger says that ...although it might be thought that the sentence was ...


8

Good question. My sense is that to get a fully satisfactory answer, Mark's version ought to be read beside the other accounts in the Synoptics (Matthew, Luke). (Those interested can read them, with the addition of John, in English and Greek at BibleGateway.) For Mark 11:3, the parallels work this way (n.b.: although John has a version of the "Triumphal ...


7

Jon gives a good answer as to why Jesus would have been able to speak Greek, Aramaic, and Hebrew. He also asked for more information regarding the existence of Hebrew in the Land at the time of Jesus. Mishnaic Hebrew was very well known in the first century and was distinguished from Aramaic in such works as the Letter of Aristeas and Josephus. See below for ...


6

Mark records the partial healing of the blind man to illustrate Jesus healing of his disciples partial understanding. Though the disciples see that Jesus is the Christ, they see only in part. Jesus is the Christ but not the Christ of their expectations. The two-part healing of the blind man (8:22-26) is sandwhiched between Jesus' rebuke of the disciples ...


6

There appear to be at least four decent options for the interpretation of "this mountain" in Mark 11:23 canvassed by the commentators. (1) there is no specific mountain in mind. True, the Greek here (and in the parallels in Matt 17:20 and (with variation) Luke 17:6, where it is "sycamore" rather than "mountain"; cf. also 1 Cor 13:2) is "say to this ...


5

Mark records that Jesus goes on to say: 43But it shall not be so among you. But whoever would be great among you must be your servant, 44and whoever would be first among you must be slave of all. ESV So you could ask "who in the Bible most fits that description?". An argument could be made for Paul or perhaps one of the other apostles, but I do not ...


5

Markan priority is an answer to the question what is the precise literary relationship between Matthew, Mark and Luke, also known as the Synoptic problem. A close comparison of the first three gospels suggests that one or more of these writers had one or more of the other gospels before them as they wrote. This is more than a common oral tradition. ...


4

The Rev. William E. Flippin Jr. - Naked Young Man and the Easter Angel in the Gospel of Mark - Mark 14:51-52 "And a young man followed [Jesus], with nothing but a linen cloth about his body. And they seized him, but he left the linen cloth and ran away naked." Jesus had no help at the cross from his followers. Only he could bring about our ...


4

From International Standard Bible Encyclopedia This is the favorite self-designation of Jesus in the Gospels. In Matthew it occurs over 30 times, in Mark 15 times, in Luke 25 times, and in John a dozen times. It is always in the mouth of Jesus Himself that it occurs, except once, when the bystanders ask what He means by the title (John 12:34). ...


4

This is a tough one, and every commentator I've consulted (quite a few) acknowledges that this is probably an intractable problem. One common theme, however, is the resistance to simply explaining away the enigma and even offense. Two variables commonly condsidered are (1) the agricultural details (what is the season, and what kind of fruit?); which can ...


3

It may have simply been the author's comment. A redaction is an edit or revision to an original text. This is a synoptic parallel shared among the three Synoptic Gospels, i.e. Matthew, Mark, and Luke. However, you did not cite the one which occurs in Luke. In Luke 21:20-21 (KJV), it is written, 20 And when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with armies, ...


3

This verse has a parallel in Matt. 26:46, in which the same verb ἄγωμεν occurs. The particular conjugation ἄγωμεν also occurs in the following verses. It is the equivalent of the English phrase, "Let's go..." Mark 1:38 John 11:7 John 11:15 John 14:31 Thayer describes this usage sense as intransitive (lacking a direct object).1 However, it can be followed ...


3

In his Introduction to the Gospel of Matthew, Heinrich Meyer wrote, It was Matthew who, before he passed over to the service of Jesus, was called Levi, and was a collector of taxes by the lake of Tiberias, where he was called away by Jesus from the receipt of custom. From Matthew 9:9, compared with Mark 2:14 and Luke 5:27, it is sufficiently evident that ...


3

Short Answer: After weighing all of the evidence (both internal and external), it would seem that Mark 16:9-20 was indeed originally part of Mark's Gospel. The ending of Mark's Gospel is one of the major textual problems in the New Testament.1 As noted by the OP, the "problem" is whether the end of Mark (16:9-20) was originally part of Mark's Gospel. ...


3

I am having trouble finding citations for this, so maybe some of the more erudite members of this list can help me out, but: I have read from a few sources that Mark's spelling, grammar, and overall Greek style are just about at the bottom of the barrel of the New Testament, a spot probably shared by Revelation. This being the case (and I'm assuming it is, ...


3

Reading this passage today made me want to research it. Jesus is Lord of the Sabbath, and He came to fulfill the law not break it. This passage has several aspects that are best read together as Jesus combines them: Jesus and Disciples Pluck and Eat Grains on the Sabbath At that time Jesus went through the grainfields on the Sabbath. And His disciples ...


3

Robertson says, "See Isaiah 66:24." Reading Isaiah 66:24: Then they will go forth and look On the corpses of the men Who have transgressed against Me. For their worm will not die And their fire will not be quenched; And they will be an abhorrence to all mankind. ...makes it pretty clear that "their" refers to "the men who have transgressed against ...


3

An explanation is found in Smith's Comprehensive Bible Dictionary. I found it as a footnote in the book Jesus the Christ by James E. Talmage: There are three kinds of fig trees in the East: Early fig, ripening about the end of June Summer fig, ripening in August Winter fig, larger and darker than the summer fig, hanging and ripening late on the tree, ...


2

If you have not read 'The last twelve verses of Mark' from Dean John Burgon, I'm sad to say that you have not fully researched this subject. Please read it, it will honestly vindicate these verses as a true part of the Holy Scriptures as they truly are. This book has not been fully answered by the critics since it publication over a hundred years ago, simply ...


2

Mark includes these two feedings in order to give both structure and meaning to to those who hear his narrative. While visual signals such as chapter numbers and verses, section titles, paragraph indentations, highlighted words etc. help modern readers orient themselves to a stories structure and point, ancient books had no graphic signals, not even spaces ...


2

TWO KINGDOMS SIMILAR In the Bible, there are two different kingdoms that are mentioned. These two kingdoms are the kingdom of heaven and the kingdom of God. (Matthew 3:1-2 [KJV]) 1 In those days came John the Baptist, preaching in the wilderness of Judaea, 2 And saying, Repent ye: for the kingdom of heaven is at hand. (Mark 1:14-15 [KJV]) 14 Now after ...


2

I think there could be many hypothesis: Aramaic was also a language of divine worship and the bible, so using that language could evoke that connection in a way that use of Greek couldn't. Mark evidently wants to preserve this. We know that translating parts of the bible into Aramaic predated Christianity (Philip Alexander Aramaic Bible 17A Canticles: ...


2

We should not try to answer this question just by reading English texts, but at least supplement this either by reading the Greek texts or referring to material written by those who can. The issue here is that Matthew, Mark and Luke contain passages that are consistently in the same order (suggesting copying) and frequently use exactly the same words in the ...


2

The focus of Jesus' question is on which is easier to say: "Your sins are forgiven" or "Rise, pick up your mat, and walk." The first statement is easier to say since no one could possibly validate such a claim. There is no empirical test that a man's sins are indeed forgiven. But to say to a paralytic, "Get up and walk" - this sets up an easy test of the ...


2

Mark is without doubt the most straightforward of the gospels. The book is short and engaging. It is more critical of the disciples than the other gospel, often in a humorous way. Often Mark includes details that Matthew and Luke choose to leave out, i.e. that the grass was green when the 5000 sat down to eat. Mark often chooses a few stories and tells ...


2

I find your question a little perplexing, though I assume--rightly I hope--that your question has to do with the apparently conflicting descriptions of the events which occurred after Jesus' death and before He resurrected and appeared to His disciples, starting with Mary Magdalene. In attempting to come up with an answer, I consulted Orville E. Daniel's ...


1

I believe the other answer is not a good understanding of the historical event in context. One thing we should not do is try to read into the text what we know from tradition. The tradition I am speaking of is Good Friday. We should not try to fit the text into man made traditions because it simply doesn't work and it does not match with the written ...


1

John Carroll says in The Existential Jesus, page 255, that a large majority of biblical scholars assume that Mark’s Gospel was written around 70 CE, or a few years earlier or later. He says (ibid, page 11) the consensus is that Mark's Gospel was the first New Testament gospel to be written. This places Mark at a time when the emerging Christian religion ...


1

I would have to agree with everything stated above by Niobius about the style and aims of Mark's gospel. If I may add a little something, it's possible that, while being an accurate account, the tidbit about the naked young man in Mark 14:51 forms a loose inclusio with the fully dressed young man in Mark 16:5. Exactly what this is to emphasize is unsure, but ...


1

The short answer: Most likely, Mark translated the Aramaic in 5:41, 15:22, and 7:34 for the benefit of his Roman readers, some or most of whom may not have read Aramaic. Many Roman citizens could speak Aramaic, particularly traders, shippers, bankers, vendors and the like, but not every Roman could speak it, let alone read and write it. Another answer ...



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