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I will start from the Greek and explain the reasons for the discrepancies between your translation and the ESV (which I consider a faithful rendition of the Greek here). ὅτι οὐκ εἰσπορεύεται αὐτοῦ εἰς τὴν καρδίαν ἀλλ᾿ εἰς τὴν κοιλίαν, καὶ εἰς τὸν ἀφεδρῶνα ἐκπορεύεται, καθαρίζων πάντα τὰ βρώματα; (NA28) since not it enters her/he into mind/soul, ...


4

The word 'ἠγέρθη' transliterates into ēgerthē, meaning in its infinitive form 'to rise'. To understand the intended meaning of the word in a specific case we should look both at how the word is used elsewhere in the same work, using a semantic analysis, and at the immediate surrounding context of the narrative, using an informative analysis. Note also that ...


3

In Mary in the New Testament, Raymond Brown, Joseph Fitzmyer, and Karl Donfried offer a fairly balanced presentation of the main interpretations of the phrase "son of Mary" that have been suggested by scholars: Mark is trying to stress the human characteristics of Jesus in response to "God only" view of his audience. That is, Joseph is not mentioned ...


2

The fig tree cursing narrative is found in Matthew's and Mark's gospels. Mark's account varies in sequence from Matthew's account as it is written in two sections: First, after departing the temple, Jesus sees the fig tree in leaf, but no fruit found, followed by cursing [Mark 11:12-14]. Second, after departing from temple (Where Jesus drives out money ...


1

I am a little bit confused by your statement that “the Aramaic translation would equate to something like…” In fact there is no need for “would”. The Aramaic (Syriac, Pshitta) translation of Mark 6 :3 is : ܠܳܐ ܗ݈ܘܳܐ ܗܳܢܳܐ ܢܰܓ݁ܳܪܳܐ ܒ݁ܪܳܗ ܕ݁ܡܰܪܝܰܡ ܘܰܐܚܽܘܗ݈ܝ ܕ݁ܝܰܥܩܽܘܒ݂ ܘܰܕ݂ܝܳܘܣܺܐ ܘܕ݂ܺܝܗܽܘܕ݂ܳܐ ܘܰܕ݂ܫܶܡܥܽܘܢ which is exactly like the Greek: οὐχ οὗτός ἐστιν ὁ ...


1

The Greek word ἠγέρθη simply means that Jesus was 'raised' and, without context, could mean that Jesus was raised in the physical world or taken bodily up into heaven. The context we have in Mark, as originally written (to end at verse 16:9), is that Jesus' body was not there, and he was not seen again. Two chapters earlier, in verse 13:26, Mark's Jesus ...


1

What Language Did Jesus Speak Most Often? The scholarly consensus is clear on this issue: Jesus' native tongue was Aramaic, specifically a Galilean dialect of Aramaic. Why Were Jesus' Words Recorded In Greek? It is simple to understand why the Gospels were written in Greek. Most of the communities of early Christians were Greek-speaking; this was ...



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