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The Latin Manuscripts of the New Testament are of two main families. The oldest complete New Testament in Old Latin (the version that predates Jeremone's Vulgate) is known as Codex Ardmachanus and comes from ca 850. Codex Speculum contains all of the New Testament except 3 John, Philemon, and Hebrews (housed: Saint Cross monastery (Sessorianus) in ...


4

In order to answer such a question, we must first put away our theological preferences, whether pre-, post-, or amillennial. Only then can we objectively consider the textual evidence: According to the NA-28 apparatus, the first half of the verse is missing in codex Sinaiticus, the byzantine manuscripts, and to a few much less significant manuscripts. ...


3

"Western uncial D" is better known as Codex Bezae. It contains both a Greek and a Latin version of the gospels and acts, and is around 80% complete. In John it is missing the first three chapters. It is usually dated to the 5th century, which is very early. Nonetheless, it is not considered very reliable as it has a large number of unusual readings. ...


3

Summary The oldest extant New Testament text appears to be the Syriac Sinaitic a collection of gospels in the Old Syriac textual tradition dated to the 4th century. The oldest extant Old Testament text dates to the 5th century. These are about as old as the earliest Greek texts, and much older than all extant Hebrew texts except for the Dead Sea Scrolls. ...


3

Earliest "surviving" Aramaic manuscript (a.k.a Syriac) dates to 5th century AD (Syriac manuscript # 14,470) which is available at British Library. Many of the earliest Aramaic manuscripts were destroyed. For Example, Archbishop Menezies succeeded in destroying ancient Aramaic manuscipts (includes OT and NT) which was preserved in Kerala (South India) until ...


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There is a brief but reliable account of the production of the Great Bible in S. L. Greenslade (ed.), The Cambridge History of the Bible: Volume 3, The West from the Reformation to the Present Day (Cambridge University Press, 1963), pp. 150-152.* Greenslade also wrote this chapter on English versions in the 16th C. (It's a very common work, and should be in ...


2

This is controversial subject you're inquiring into. You must know that there seems to exist a strong bias among Western scholars toward proving that original texts of New Testament were written in Greek. This bias seems to be rooted partially in tradition of Catholic and Orthodox Churches and is "inherited" by Protestants. Because of that everything NOT ...


2

Here is the actual digital photograph of the uncial itself. The hash mark (to the left in the margin) is where the "Pericope Adulterae" actually begins in the text, and please note as a matter of passing interest that there are no marginalia or corrections by other editors. In other words, the copyist(s) for the Codex Bezae had written the uncial including ...



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