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The genealogies split apart and come together again twice, if you compare Matthew and Luke. They split apart after David. Matthew follows Solomons royal line down to Jeconias, whom he says begat Salathiel. Luke follows Nathan down a nonroyal list to Neri, whom he claims to be the father of Salathiel. Both Neri and Jechonias could only have been considered ...


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Manfred Oeming says, in Contemporary Hermeneutics, page 32, the goal of the dominant historical-critical method of exegesis is the recovery of the original meaning each text had at the time it was written [my emphasis]. The importance of this statement is that in using historical-critical hermeneutics we must put aside notions of theology that were not ...


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When I.H. Marshall comments on the Mary/Martha story in Luke he indicates that a female student would be rare. I have a recollection of a lecture by Amy Jill-Levine who indicated that there is some evidence for female students of Rabbis, but I've not actually come across many citations in my studies since then. Even if it were to be demonstrated true, its ...


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Regardless of how the particle γὰρ is translated, I don't think a causal relationship between marriage and death can be avoided in these verses. If we take γὰρ in its basic sense of "for", then Jesus seems to be saying that there will be no marriage in the resurrection because there will be no death. To understand why Jesus would say this, we must first ...


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Based on a comparison of various translations of this passage, it would appear that the conjunction γὰρ does not necessarily always imply a direct dependency. The NETBible, for example, translates it as "in fact". So Jesus appears to be using this conjunction to "pivot" from the Sadducees misunderstanding of marriage in the afterlife, to their ...


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Only the very poor were permitted to offer two doves or pigeons when presenting a newly born son at the temple, as Joseph and Mary do in Luke 2:22. On the other hand, the gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh would have made them quite rich. There are two possible reasons that Joseph and Mary only offered pigeons or doves. Either the magi had not yet ...


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Some possible answers may be found in 1 Corinthians 7. Here, Paul explains the necessity of marriage for those believers who are oppressed & tormented by instinctual (natural) sexual lust. But about the Resurrection to the Deathless state, Paul states: 29. What I mean, my friends, is this: there is not much time left, and from now on married people ...


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Luke's supposed profession would no doubt matter when interpreting his work as an author, if indeed he was the author. As the question says, tradition assigns Luke as author of the gospel that now bears his name and of Acts of the Apostles, but this is only tradition and these books were originally anonymous, remaining so until the second century. If there ...


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The three contradictory accounts can not be resolved by looking for the 'truth', because we have no way of establishing which account is true in any absolute sense. However, we can, and should, understand the contradiction from the history of the gospels themselves. Mark's Gospel was the first account to be written, believed to be written about 70 CE. ...


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The children's game is one Jesus likely played when he was 10 years old. The game was to mimic adult emotions without a deeper understanding -- just mimicry. The game would take forms of mimicry and proceed toward trying to confuse or worry the other team of children so that eventually the whole group would dissolve in laughter and confusion. Jesus used ...


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A correct interpretation of Luke 2:2 requires taking into account a key item of historical information of a most practical nature: any census of subjects (as opposed to citizens) of the Roman Empire was carried out for tax purposes, to determine the taxable base of each subject. In such a census, people to be registered were not expected to travel but to do ...


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One person who advocates this position is Andrew Gregory (The Reception of Luke and Acts in the Period Before Irenaeus, page 2), who says that the modern assumption of Luke and Acts as two volumes of a longer work is a modern construct. He says that this is not to deny that Luke wrote two successive volumes and possibly set out to write two successive ...


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I believe the answer is "for us" (i.e. for the Apostles). Preceding parable: Luke 12:35–40 (RSV) Let your loins be girded and your lamps burning, and be like men who are waiting for their master to come home from the marriage feast, so that they may open to him at once when he comes and knocks. Blessed are those servants whom the master finds ...


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Rhetorical imitation Matthew Ryan Hauge (The Biblical Tour of Hell, page 55) says that two recent studies suggest 'Luke' advanced to the early stages of a rhetorical education, which means that he was trained in the art of copying and the complexities of rhetorical composition through mimesis. Whether or not Luke did copy material from Josephus or from any ...


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I don't know if you would consider John Chrysostom a scholar (he was a Church Father), but this is what he said about disagreements and inconsistencies in the Gospels in general: What then? Was not one evangelist sufficient to tell all? One indeed was sufficient; but if there be four that write, not at the same times, nor in the same places, neither ...


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To assume that it is a fabrication, is an option, however, it is not the only or best option, given the contemporary witnesses to substantiate these claims, given the acceptance of Luke's gospel by those apostles who were there at that time, given the values and ethics of the followers of Jesus. Instead, let's look at some others much more plausible reasons: ...



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