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Most commentaries seem to conclude that it at least it was indicative of the Last Supper, if not a re-enactment of it. I tend to agree with Darrel Bock(if I understand him correctly), that this was not a re-enactment of the Last Supper: The Last Supper(what we tend to look at as the institution of the Lord's Table) was in fact the Passover.(Luke 22:11) ...


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Argument from Passover The Last Supper was the Passover meal, which required the eating of unleavened bread: Luke 22:7,8 (ESV) Then came the day of Unleavened Bread, on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. So Jesus sent Peter and John, saying, “Go and prepare the Passover for us, that we may eat it.” Exodus 12 and 13 prescribe a week of ...


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The real answer to this question is, Is Christ's death is payment in full for all sin?:(Heb. 10:10-18) "By the which will we are sanctified through the offering of the body of Jesus Christ once for all. 11And every priest standeth daily ministering and offering oftentimes the same sacrifices, which can never take away sins: 12But this man, after he ...


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I will add only one additional thought to Mike's fine answer, above, particularly regarding his singling out "teachers/preachers/priests" as the primary "target" of Jesus' teaching on stewardship. Jesus was speaking, of course, to His followers. Peter in fact asked his Lord if he was speaking to him and his fellow disciples or to "everyone else instead" ...


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Hosea 10.8 While a number of the Hebrew prophetic books look at neighboring nations, the entirety of the book of Hosea is concerned with one subject: the tumultuous relationship between God and Israel. The book opens with God instructing Hosea marry a prostitute, with her adultery being used as an illustration of Israel's faithlessness to God, especially ...


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I would not usually answer a 'what is the traditional view' of a bible verse, being that many verses have divided views and are surrounded by controversy, however in this case most seem to agree. Furthermore you add a second question which in a theological one that almost seems to beg for the clarification 'according to a Catholic view' but here again ...


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The NET notes are helpful here: The figure of crying out to the mountains ‘Fall on us!’ (appealing to creation itself to hide them from God’s wrath), means that a time will come when people will feel they are better off dead (Hos 10:8). The "better off dead" sense comes across in both Luke and Hosea (Jesus seems to be repeating the prophecy), but the ...


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Jesus means none of the four things you noted Here is a slightly expanded context to the words you quote. John the Baptist had just sent messengers to confirm some things about Jesus (Lk 7:18-23). After they leave, Jesus says some very impressive words about John the Baptist (Lk 7:24-28). At this point is... Luke 7:29-35 29 (All the people, even the ...


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Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


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The combination of ἐγένετο and ὡσεί ("was like" or "became like" drops of blood) are used in Mark 9:26 and a variant reading of Matt. 28:4, both of which pretty clearly denote a simile ("became like dead men" and "became like a corpse," respectively). In the manuscripts of the Gospels ὡσεί and ὡς are often interchanged, suggesting that those who transcribed ...



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