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As stated elsewhere, we only have tradition that the apostle Matthew wrote the Gospel that now bears his name. A careful reading in the original Greek language shows that Matthew takes over almost all Mark's material, Mark's sequence of events and, for the most part, Mark’s wording. Uta Ranke-Heinemann puts the consensus of New Testament scholars succinctly ...


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What is a Will? It appears I must address this matter first, for there may be some confusion. Dyotheletism deals with the will(s) of Christ in the Incarnation, it supports the Chalcydonian declaration of two natures, one human and one divine. I found this article by James Attebury to have a useful description: I am defining a will as the desires that ...


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Introduction In one respect, you have already answered the first two parts of your own question within the question itself: God ... is referred to as "father" (as in Matthew 6:9, Romans 1:7, Ephesians 5:20, 2 Thessalonians 1:1) And this is correct. However, "they name" is merely a reference to Πάτερ (Pater), since the sentence states "Father who is in ...


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When Jesus addressed the crowds on the mount/plain would they have understood "thy name" to be Eil and Elaha (also written as Alaha). See: 'What word did Jesus use for God in Aramaic?' Matthew's Gospel was written in Greek for a Greek-speaking audience. We know that the Old Testament references used in Matthew were from the Septuagint, so the author did not ...


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The word "cross" is problematic in that it is σταυρός which refers to a "stake" rather than a traditional "cross". Over time it had also come to refer to a "cross", perhaps in the shape of a "T". http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0057%3Aentry%3D%2396298&redirect=true Another issue is the physical challenge of ...


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As rightly quoted from Joh 19:36, the author understood the relationship of Christ to the Passover lamb - it was to be cooked whole and not broken. This is supported by NT commentary where it describes Christ as being crucified, put to death and nailed to the cross. No other scripture (OT or NT) indicates that Christ's body was or required to be broken. ...


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In this answer, I will argue two points. 1) The phrase “this generation” (ἡ γενεὰ αὕτη) as used in the Olivet Discourse, is essentially a synonym for “age” (ὁ αἰῶν), which can mean a segment of time as a particular unit of history, age (BDAG, αἰῶν 2). 2) When Jesus' says “this generation will not pass away until all these things take place,” (Mat 24:34), ...


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The simple answer to your question, no they would probably have not interprited it the same way they did if the entire bible was just that verse, but then again there would be no scholars interested in debating a religion that only demanded hatred towards others. That is why we need to look at the entirety of the gospels, and therefore we can come to this ...


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If Mark and Luke were independent of each other, this would be a puzzling contradiction that we would need to resolve if we ever wanted to know in what order events really occurred. However, it is now the strong consensus of scholars that Luke was based on Mark's Gospel, with further sayings material taken from the hypothetical 'Q' document. Some of the ...



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