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In Search of Lost Lilies “[A]lthough there is little doubt that the word [κρίνον] denotes some plant of the lily species, it is by no means certain what individual of this class it especially designates.” So William Smith framed his widely-quoted and, as we’ll see, outdated entry for ‘Lily’ in his popular Bible dictionary of 1863. Following his ...


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The lower priority of the relationship is the intended meaning of "hate." Putting aside familial relationships, even mother and father for the sake of following Jesus and the kingdom of God is necessary to fulfill God's purposes in our lives. We cannot remain safe and comfortable and follow Jesus. Since our Master suffered, so shall we. Family members ...


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Jesus was not talking about hating any person or group of persons. The possessive case is used clearly here. Jesus was well aware of the damaging idea of belief that you own anything. (i.e. possessions) this frame of mind is small and anchors the persons spirit more firmly to the physical world. His teaching is all about finding liberation in the mind. Or ...


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Yes, Jesus is also a "Good Samaritan". Though we are the ones that are supposed to learn from this parable. It's for our sakes he told it. Remember that God is "I Am", which is to say He is everything good and complete. This includes roles as a good neighbor and even a servant. If being a good neighbor is something good (which it is) then it's source is ...


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Since our purpose is to seek answers, rather than just discussion, I would say the answer is NO, the good Samaritan does not represent Jesus, even if some early church fathers and medieval preachers (who typically over-used allegory) interpreted it that way. (BTW, the reason for this overuse of allegory was that the Greeks were famous for it, and so it was ...


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One commentary notes: Probably no parable has been allegorized more often than this one. The most famous allegory is that of Augustine.49 The irony of Augustine’s and similar allegorical interpretations is that the parable is introduced (10:29) and concludes with (10:36) questions about what it means to be a neighbor, whereas the allegorical ...


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The question is whether the author known to us as Luke intended to portray Jesus by analogy as either of the characters in the parable of the Good Samaritan. Unfortunately there's no way of knowing the author's intent in this case. The New World Encyclopedia reference to Parable of the Good Samaritan offers some allegorical opinions, saying that according ...


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This also brings into play another allusion, to Moses when he fasted for 40 days while he wrote the words of the Ten Commandments on tablets, Dick Harfield: Exodus 34:28: And he was there with the LORD forty days and forty nights; he did neither eat bread, nor drink water. And he wrote upon the tables the words of the covenant, the ten ...


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There have been instances when fasting was used as a tool to gain spiritual strength. When the disciples of Christ were unable to cast out a spirit, they take part in the following discussion recorded in Matthew 17:19-21 (KJV) 19Then came the disciples to Jesus apart, and said, Why could not we cast him out? 20 And Jesus said unto them, Because of ...


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Wilderness can be symbolic of apostasy or wickedness (Is. 64:10). Jesus lived in such a time.


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First of all you are using NIV. Horrible Translation! It would help to use Rotherham's, Smith And Goodspeed, Ferrar Fenton, etc. Some other good translation besides KJV and NIV. SEVENTY is another combination of two of the perfect numbers, seven and ten. We have seen something of the significance of their sum under the number seventeen; their product is no ...


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Context Luke 18:8 is at the end of a conversation that began back at Luke 17:20, where Jesus was asked by a pharisee when the kingdom of God would come. He didn't answer the question directly, but replied: ... The kingdom of God does not come with observation; nor will they say, "See here!" or "See there!" For indeed, the kingdom of God is within you. ...


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The earliest story of Jesus going into the wilderness occurs in Mark 1:13. Adam Winn (Mark and the Elijah-Elisha Narrative) says that all the details of Jesus' temptation narrative find parallels in the wilderness experiences of Elijah. Both Elijah and Jesus are in the wilderness for forty days, both are tempted, both are attended by angels and both are in ...


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In Matthew 10, Jesus has just chosen His 12 disciples and proceeds to give them His instructions for anyone who wants to be a disciple. In verse 38, the phrase "take his cross and follows me" refers to each person's unique call in life. A disciple must embrace and live out his/her personal call to follow Jesus. Again, in Matthew 16:24, Jesus says, "takes up ...



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