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This is a parallel account in Scripture; Matt. 11:16-19 is almost identical to Luke 7:31-35, εἶπεν δὲ ὁ Κύριος, Τίνι οὖν ὁμοιώσω τοὺς ἀνθρώπους τῆς γενεᾶς ταύτης καὶ τίνι εἰσὶν ὅμοιοι.(Textus Receptus Stephanus 1550)(vs 31) To what therefore will I liken the men the generation of this and to what are they like ?(Interlinear translation) Τίνι, ...


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The number of measures (three) is a purposeful part of the parable. An understanding of the meaning of the parable should be based on the number three. In the Kingdom of God every person can be put into one of three groups: Gentile, Jewish, or Levite. If leaven is considered something of a spiritual nature, then the kingdom of heaven is likened to all ...


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Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


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The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


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It seems to me that the Author intends us to read the parable of the Mustard seed and the parable of the leaven together, hence the pericope is v31-33 31 Another parable He put forth to them, saying: "The kingdom of heaven is like a mustard seed, which a man took and sowed in his field, 32 "which indeed is the least of all the seeds; but when it is ...


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Rex Wyler, in The Jesus Sayings, page 111, says the parable of the leaven in the flour appears to satirise a story (Genesis 18:6) about Sarah, who used three measures of choice flour to bake cakes for heavenly messengers visiting Abraham. I would call this a long shot, but then we find the story of the leaven follows the parable of the mustard seed in Luke ...


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Regarding μισέω (miseó) Luke 14:26 uses the term μισέω ("hate" in many, perhaps all, English translations) in a context that reasonably shows its usage to be something other than "an adversarial emotion we recognize as 'hate.'" That is, it is used in a relative sense there, where Christ is comparing the fact that one ought to "detest" father, mother, wife, ...


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It is probably easier to address the questions in reverse order. Question 2) Why the significant difference between the NA27 and TR in Matthew, but not in Luke? Comfort and Metzger both explain that the reading τέκνων most likely originated as a scribal emendation intended to harmonize this text with the parallel in Luke 7:35. Metzger for example ...


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He was oppressed and He was afflicted, Yet He opened not His mouth; He was led as a lamb to the slaughter, And as a sheep before its shearers is silent, So He opened not His mouth. (Isaiah 53:7 NKJV) Jesus did speak before the High Priest and before Pilate. He did not speak before Herod and so Isaiah 53:7 was completely fulfilled.


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"Sataniel was hurled from the heights with his angels." – 2 Enoch 29 The biblical passage often suggested by Christian exegetes as informing Jesus’ saying in Luke 10:18 is Isaiah 14:12. But this verse does not include Satan, demons, or lightning in its original Hebrew interpretation. Centuries after Jesus, Isaiah’s metaphorical helel ben Shahar (‘Morning ...


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There are no significant manuscript or translation issues with this verse, though some versions do offer a somewhat different verb tense. In response to the good report that even demons were subject to his name, Jesus said to the 70, “I was watching Satan fall from heaven like lightning” (Lk.10:18b, NASB). According to the gospel writer, Jesus did ...


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It is only in Luke's Gospel that we find Pontius Pilate asking Herod Antipas to try Jesus, as the other New Testament gospels tell us that Pontius Pilate alone tried Jesus, with no apparent possibility of those gospels merely omitting involvement by Herod: Matthew 27:11-26; Mark 15:1-15; John 18:29-19:16. Luke chapter 23 does not tell us why Jesus did not ...


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When I need to look a Bible Passage up on the internet I usually go to BibleHub.com or BibleGateway.com. when I went to BibleHub I found that every translation they had listed used the name Satan, except for one, Young's Literal Translation which follows and he said to them, 'I was beholding the Adversary, as lightning from the heaven having fallen; ...


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When Jesus fed the 5000 he asked his disciples a question. What do you have? They were looking at the bigness of the problem and not looking to the bigness of their God. Like mustard seed, if you use what little you do have, then God can give the increase. You can put a mustard seed into a blazing fire and from the ashes you can plant it and it will still ...


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Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. (2 Timothy 2:15 NKJV) When rightly divided, the two accounts do not conflict: In those days it occurred that a decree went out from Caesar Augustus that the whole Roman empire should be registered. This was the first ...


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Each gospel writer put in those things which further and advance the conclusion to which he is heading toward. Of importance to Matthew is the royal line coming down from king David. Jesus must have a royal bloodline so David is mentioned 6 times in chap. 1. In MATT.1:1 David is mentioned before Abraham who fathered the nation of Israel. This shows Jesus ...


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Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 7, that the nativity accounts in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are, with respect to time, place, and circumstances, a collection of legends. She says (page 11) Luke wants to make the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem plausible by fabricating the story of the census. But since he handles the facts ...


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This is a good, piercing question that goes to the root of a lot. Unfortunately I have had to conclude [30 years or so of study] that we are not told the full answer to the question. First, there is nothing in the Genesis record that speaks plainly about a "Satan" being given authority over anything. Sticking to the text, we are told of a serpent who is a ...



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