Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

There are two possible reasons why 'they were signing' (ἐνένευον) to him in Luke 1:62: Zechariah was mute and deaf. While there is no indication that the angel Gabriel brought about anything other than muteness,1 v. 22 states that he remained κωφός, which in addition to referring to a "lack of speech capability," can also imply a "lack of hearing ...


11

The wise men came after baby Jesus was presented in the temple. If you see a harmony of the Gospels, like Study Resources :: Harmony of the Gospels, you will find that the wise men came long after Jesus was presented in the temple. Presentation in the temple A woman who bore a son was ceremonially unclean for forty days (twice that if she bore a daughter ...


7

The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He ...


7

The Greek word in question, εντος, means 'inside' or 'within'. Surprisingly, despite being a typical word in Greek, is used only twice in the New Testament: here in Luke 17.21, and over in Matthew 23.26, where it refers to the 'inside' of a cup. Translating εντος as 'within' is more accurate, but also fits the context better; in this text, Jesus argues ...


7

This was not, perhaps, Leon Morris's finest moment (quote is on p. 17, originally published 1974), although he certainly wasn't alone in assuming this datum. Neither Howard Marshall, nor John Nolland make mention of Marcion in their circumspect discussions of the attribution of authorship of the third (canonical) gospel -- simply to cite two subsequent ...


6

The presence of synagogues hasn't been corroborated by much archaeological evidence. [1] However, synagogues in the land (as opposed to the diaspora) are mentioned a handful of times by Josephus, but all of them were located north, away from Jerusalem. This includes a synagogue (Josephus uses the term proseuche) at Tiberius in Galilee. (Josephus, Life ...


6

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


6

0) AN APOLOGY FOR THE LENGTHINESS OF THIS POST Ι realize that by apologizing for the length of this post, I'm actually making the post longer. But so be it. I tried making the post shorter without compromising the content, but was not able to. You can skip most of the verses I quote without missing much, if you want. 1) THE PHRASE "DAUGHTER OF ...


6

Jesus is being compared to John the Baptist by the Pharisees in that John ate sparingly and only things such as locust and honey and drank no wine. Jesus ate pretty much whatever he wanted to and drank wine, and was accused of gluttony and being a winebibber or drunken, because of this. They thought John the Baptist diet strange and too controlled, but when ...


6

The Muratorian fragment isn't simply a list of books included in the canon, but also a description of them. It's description of the Gospel of Luke makes it very clear that they believed it was written by Luke: The third book of the Gospel [is that] according to Luke. Luke, "the" physician, after the ascension of Christ, when Paul had taken him with him ...


5

There are a couple possiblities that present themselves that have some support. One possibility stems from what may be observed sociologically. Women will often refrain from announcing their pregnancy until they are beyond the stage where most miscarriages might occur. For one barren for so long, it would be difficult to endure feeling that shame removed ...


5

It is omitted in versions where the committee of experts behind the translation determined that those words were most likely not in the original text of Luke. In this particular case, the evidence that these words were not original is very strong, though not completely overwhelming. The shorter version is found in: Both extant Papyrus texts (P45 and ...


5

Zacchaeus (Luke 19:1-10) tl;dr; Analysis of the grammar indicates that Zacchaeus is on the verge of a large shift in his understanding of his place and power as well as the nature of of whom this Jesus is. Jesus, having demonstrated the capacity to know the hearts of humans, understands the eternal implications of this shift. Specific Context Jesus ...


5

Warning. Giant wall of text from my master's thesis upcoming. tl;dr; It is likely that the discount applied by the steward had no impact on his employer because of the practice of adding excessive commission to sales. The discount can be seen as the steward discounting his own commission in order to gain favor with the debtors. The Parable of The Steward ...


5

While Luke indeed points out in his Gospel that Joseph was of the house of David,1 it is curious why this was of importance to the narrative, since Jesus was conceived without the seed of Joseph. This led many early Christian Church Fathers and scholars to propose that Mary is also of the house and lineage of David.2 From here several hypotheses emerged to ...


5

The NET notes are helpful here: The figure of crying out to the mountains ‘Fall on us!’ (appealing to creation itself to hide them from God’s wrath), means that a time will come when people will feel they are better off dead (Hos 10:8). The "better off dead" sense comes across in both Luke and Hosea (Jesus seems to be repeating the prophecy), but the ...


5

Hosea 10.8 While a number of the Hebrew prophetic books look at neighboring nations, the entirety of the book of Hosea is concerned with one subject: the tumultuous relationship between God and Israel. The book opens with God instructing Hosea to marry a prostitute, with her adultery being used as an illustration of Israel's faithlessness to God, ...


5

It is Passive The verb is ἐκρατοῦντο (ekratounto), which is the imperfect passive indicative 3rd plural of the verb κρατέω (krateō), which in this context has the idea of "restrain."1 However, it is not that they did not "see" Jesus (v.15) in some respect, but that when they saw Him, they did not "know" (ἐπιγνῶναι; epignōnai) it was Him, hence the NRSV ...


5

The short answer is, because he ate "locusts and wild honey" (Mt 3:4; Mk 1:6). The slightly longer explanation is that John the Baptist lived a simple life (Lk 7:25) in the wilderness, where he was called from (Lk 3:2) and in which he ministered (Mt 3:1; Mk 1:4; Lk 7:24). Thus he lived off the land by eating these insects for protein, fat, and nutrients (as ...


4

Concerning the accuracy of the gospel The introduction to Luke's gospel is in "high" Greek, as was common in historical writing at the time. Moreover, the author claims to have researched events well. We know that the author had gained access to Mark, and claims to have utilized several additional sources until he got "perfect knowledge" of the events ...


4

The saying, which begins in Luke 23.28 and concludes with the green tree-dry tree analogy of verse 23.31, fits into the eschatology of the Synoptic Gospels, which is largely focused on the 70 AD destruction of Jerusalem (cf. Luke 21). A 'green' tree is a living tree. A 'dry' tree is a dead tree. It goes without saying which of the two is easier to burn. ...


4

I may not fully understand your question, and it's difficult to parse what you're seeking, but the evidence would indicate that this story was actually a "stock trope" that Jesus leveraged to teach his audience about how to value people above possessions. In the below answer I attempt to address (Luke's) "authorial intent" in the way that he organized the ...


4

Luke 1:26 in the Greek is Ἐν δὲ τῷ μηνὶ τῷ ἕκτῳ ἀπεστάλη ὁ ἄγγελος Γαβριὴλ υἀπὸ τοῦ θεοῦ εἰς πόλιν τῆς Γαλιλαίας ᾗ ὄνομα Ναζαρὲθ In yet the month the sixth was commissioned the messenger Gabriel by the God into city of the Galilee to which name Nazareth And in the sixth month God sent the angel Gabriel into the city of Galilee which is called ...


4

Analysis of the Greek Below is given the Greek of the majority text for both the Matthew and Luke passages. The UBS/NA text omits the words below that are in [brackets]. Thus, Luke 11:2 does not contain the phrase in Luke if one follows the minority reading. Note that otherwise, the passages are the same, so I have only translated Matthew here (since it ...


3

I upvoted Mark Edward's answer, but in the spirit of Proverbs 18:17 I though I'd present the other side of the argument for consideration. Semantics It is dangerous to attribute a single English definition to a Greek word. (A) Words have a semantic range, and (B) the meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. BDAG indicates ἐντος ...


3

To assume that it is omitted from the ESV is an invalid assumption. Another possibility is that it was added to the KJV. There are two different manuscript families represented by the KJV and ESV, so, in reality, the KJV added nothing nor did the ESV omit anything. They simply represent accurately the manuscripts which they translate. The question then ...


3

This question goes back to where we get out current Bible from. There are several ancient manuscripts, and there are some minor discrepancies between them. These words are omitted in the Codex Vaticanus and others. Luke 9:55–56 – και ειπεν, Ουκ οιδατε ποιου πνευματος εστε υμεις; ο γαρ υιος του ανθρωπου ουκ ηλθεν ψυχας ανθρωπων απολεσαι αλλα σωσαι ...


3

In his Introduction to the Gospel of Matthew, Heinrich Meyer wrote, It was Matthew who, before he passed over to the service of Jesus, was called Levi, and was a collector of taxes by the lake of Tiberias, where he was called away by Jesus from the receipt of custom. From Matthew 9:9, compared with Mark 2:14 and Luke 5:27, it is sufficiently evident that ...


3

Considerations Language Features Immediate Context Parallel Passages Language Features Verse 2 is directly tied to verse 3 by the Greek word αντι (an-tee') which is translated in most versions as "Therefore," "Accordingly," or some variation. This means the outcome in verse 3 should be seen as a result of the principle stated in verse 2. This shows the ...


3

Jesus means none of the four things you noted Here is a slightly expanded context to the words you quote. John the Baptist had just sent messengers to confirm some things about Jesus (Lk 7:18-23). After they leave, Jesus says some very impressive words about John the Baptist (Lk 7:24-28). At this point is... Luke 7:29-35 29 (All the people, even the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible