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6

Using a more complete lexicon than Strongs yields more precision. But the entry to study here is "ἕως" ("until") which Liddell-Scott says: A.1. with Indicative, of a fact in past time... with impf. with ἄν in apodosi, of an unaccomplished action... but we're interested in: A.2. ἕως ἄν or κε with Subjunctive (mostly of aorist), of an event at ...


5

Luke 9:49 Ἀποκριθεὶς δὲ Ἰωάννης εἶπεν· ἐπιστάτα, εἴδομέν τινα ἐν τῷ ὀνόματί σου ἐκβάλλοντα δαιμόνια καὶ ἐκωλύομεν αὐτόν, ὅτι οὐκ ἀκολουθεῖ μεθ᾽ ἡμῶν. (Luk 9:49 BGT) In context the verb Ἀποκριθεὶς carries the sense of 'responded to' or some times just to speak up (Mk 9:5; J 5:19; Ac 5:8) also according to Friberg it can be used as "as a formula to control ...


5

Matthew 24:34 ἀμὴν λέγω ὑμῖν ὅτι οὐ μὴ παρέλθῃ ἡ γενεὰ αὕτη ἕως ἂν πάντα ταῦτα γένηται. (Mat 24:34 BGT) I am not sure "supposition, wish, possibility or uncertainty." really carries the sense of the sources you provided on the link. Rather then showing that ἂν denotes uncertainty of an action they demonstrate that ἂν shows the contingent certainty of an ...


5

I do sympathize with the sentiments expressed in comments here about the complexity of Greek particles. As I started looking into this I realized that there are many pieces of the puzzle that are well beyond my own Greek. However, there is a "rule"1 about whether ἂν is included or not (albeit a controverted and contradicted one), and in broad strokes it ...


3

Yes, this seems to be a common way that it was used. As another answer pointed out, the noun is not found elsewhere in the New Testament. However, Luke was familiar with (arguably, an imitator of) both LXX and Classical Greek, and there are multiple examples of ἀγωνία with this sense available there. Because context is required, I have included only English ...


3

The "we" refers to the children of this generation. They are the ones who think they call the shots, but the men of God (John and Jesus) do not do what the scribes and Pharisees want. Notice how the actions line up. Jesus went on to say, "To what, then, can I compare the people of this generation? What are they like? They are like children sitting in the ...


2

This is a parallel account in Scripture; Matt. 11:16-19 is almost identical to Luke 7:31-35, εἶπεν δὲ ὁ Κύριος, Τίνι οὖν ὁμοιώσω τοὺς ἀνθρώπους τῆς γενεᾶς ταύτης καὶ τίνι εἰσὶν ὅμοιοι.(Textus Receptus Stephanus 1550)(vs 31) To what therefore will I liken the men the generation of this and to what are they like ?(Interlinear translation) Τίνι, ...


2

Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


2

The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


2

"Eyewitness" seems to be a key part of this. Jesus charged those who had been with Him from the beginning to be His witnesses, to spread the "word" (the Good News, the Gospel) and tell everything that they had seen, and He confirmed it by the signs that they were able to show. “When the Advocate comes, whom I will send to you from the Father—the Spirit ...


1

Yes, there is likely an allusion here. I had trouble finding many commentators who discuss even the possibility of an allusion. In fact, the sole mention I could find came from Luke Timothy Johnson's volume on Luke in the Sacra Pagina series. Almost in passing he writes: The phrase echoes the biblical language used of Adam and Eve in Gen 3:7, "the eyes ...


1

The phrase "the word" appears a number of times in Luke: (7) times it refers to "the word of God". (2) times (Lk 10, 22) it refers to words Jesus spoke. (2) times (Lk 4) it refers to Jesus' teaching. (2) times (Lk 5, 7) it refers to stories/rumors spreading. (1) time (Lk 16) it refers to an accounting of an administration. (1) time (Lk 1) it refers to ...


1

Tertulian (being a Roman) would have used a Roman calendar system of dating reigns of emperors. So, the part year of AD 14 would have been considered Tiberius' accession, and AD 15 would have been year 1, and so on. Hence the Lord would have been revealed in AD 26. It would have referred to his baptism in the year that John began baptising, and by the time ...



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