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Based on a comparison of various translations of this passage, it would appear that the conjunction γὰρ does not necessarily always imply a direct dependency. The NETBible, for example, translates it as "in fact". So Jesus appears to be using this conjunction to "pivot" from the Sadducees misunderstanding of marriage in the afterlife, to their ...


3

Regardless of how the particle γὰρ is translated, I don't think a causal relationship between marriage and death can be avoided in these verses. If we take γὰρ in its basic sense of "for", then Jesus seems to be saying that there will be no marriage in the resurrection because there will be no death. To understand why Jesus would say this, we must first ...


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One person who advocates this position is Andrew Gregory (The Reception of Luke and Acts in the Period Before Irenaeus, page 2), who says that the modern assumption of Luke and Acts as two volumes of a longer work is a modern construct. He says that this is not to deny that Luke wrote two successive volumes and possibly set out to write two successive ...


2

A correct interpretation of Luke 2:2 requires taking into account a key item of historical information of a most practical nature: any census of subjects (as opposed to citizens) of the Roman Empire was carried out for tax purposes, to determine the taxable base of each subject. In such a census, people to be registered were not expected to travel but to do ...


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Rhetorical imitation Matthew Ryan Hauge (The Biblical Tour of Hell, page 55) says that two recent studies suggest 'Luke' advanced to the early stages of a rhetorical education, which means that he was trained in the art of copying and the complexities of rhetorical composition through mimesis. Whether or not Luke did copy material from Josephus or from any ...


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To assume that it is a fabrication, is an option, however, it is not the only or best option, given the contemporary witnesses to substantiate these claims, given the acceptance of Luke's gospel by those apostles who were there at that time, given the values and ethics of the followers of Jesus. Instead, let's look at some others much more plausible reasons: ...


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Only the very poor were permitted to offer two doves or pigeons when presenting a newly born son at the temple, as Joseph and Mary do in Luke 2:22. On the other hand, the gifts of gold, frankincense and myrrh would have made them quite rich. There are two possible reasons that Joseph and Mary only offered pigeons or doves. Either the magi had not yet ...


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When I.H. Marshall comments on the Mary/Martha story in Luke he indicates that a female student would be rare. I have a recollection of a lecture by Amy Jill-Levine who indicated that there is some evidence for female students of Rabbis, but I've not actually come across many citations in my studies since then. Even if it were to be demonstrated true, its ...



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