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1 Kings 17:23 = Lk 7:15 καὶ ἔδωκεν αὐτὸν τῇ μητρὶ αὐτοῦ The wording in Lk 7:15 agrees word for word with 1 Kings 17:23 (LXX). I think it is very likely that the author of Luke had the LXX version of the Elijah story in front of him (or at least in his memory) and took it as a literary model. Compare also: 1 Kings 17:10 εἰς τὸν πυλῶνα τῆς πόλεως, καὶ ...


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There does seem to have been a developing sense of divisions of the Hebrew scriptures in the Second Temple period, with 'the Law' and 'the Prophets' mostly settled, but further divisions were still up in the air. The prologue of Sirach, written around 130 BC, mentions the Law, the Prophets, and 'the rest of the books of our fathers': Many great ...


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It is easy to show that Paul did not write the Epistle to the Hebrews, in fact that is the view of almost all modern scholars, who generally do not regard Hebrews as an epistle at all. Although attributed to Paul quite early, even many of the Church Fathers expressed doubts about Pauline authorship. When considering other possible authors, Luke was not among ...


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First of all I would suggest there is not an "eyewitness-like nature" of Acts and that perception arises more out of a wish that it be so. There are some parallels, but no more so than one would expect from a writer who had access to at least some of Paul's epistles and perhaps knowledge of what the Christian community of his time believed about Paul. The ...


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Short Answer: The prodigal son appears to have been repentant. A Disrespectful Demand? I don't think the explanation you heard holds water, for two reasons. First, the imperative mood has a "grammatical range" (similar to how vocabulary words have a semantic range); it can be used to indicate a command / demand, but it isn't always used this way. ...


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Interesting question, and several thought-evoking answers. One point that I find missing: John was raised in a dispensation wherein the Holy Spirit came upon people rather than when the Spirit came to abide within men. It seems that the text defining that he would be filled with the Holy Spirit even before birth must be considered in light of the applied ...


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The angel Gabriel had already foretold that John would receive the Holy Spirit even before his birth. 13 ... Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you are to call him John. 14 He will be a joy and delight to you, and many will rejoice because of his birth, 15 for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. He is never to take wine or other ...


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No, not necessarily. I even doubt embryonic John was filled with the Holy Spirit, since the passage does not warrant that conclusion, since it clearly says ". . . and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit" (v.41, my emphasis) I believe a better question would be: "What is the significance of Elizabeth's exclamation, "'As soon as the ...


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Accounts of evangelists do not carry all words truly spoken in an encounter. Zechariah must have uttered other words that clearly showed too much doubt that merited a punishment. It cannot be labeled a blessing for a man to lose his power of speech. It is a curse not to be able to spread a good news. Zechariah's response as recorded by Luke is simplified for ...



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